Harry Simpson

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For other people named Harry Simpson, see Harry Simpson (disambiguation).
Harry Simpson
Harry Simpson 1953.jpg
Simpson in about 1953
Outfielder / First baseman
Born: (1925-12-03)December 3, 1925
Atlanta, Georgia
Died: April 3, 1979(1979-04-03) (aged 53)
Akron, Ohio
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 21, 1951 for the Cleveland Indians
Last MLB appearance
September 27, 1959 for the Pittsburgh Pirates
Career statistics
Batting average .266
Hits 752
Home runs 73
Runs batted in 381
Teams
Career highlights and awards
  • All Star (1956)

Harry Leon "Suitcase" Simpson (December 3, 1925 – April 3, 1979) was an African American outfielder and first baseman in Major League Baseball who played for the Cleveland Indians, Kansas City Athletics, New York Yankees, Chicago White Sox, and Pittsburgh Pirates in his eight-year career. He played in the World Series with the New York Yankees in 1957, which they lost.

He was born in Atlanta, Georgia, and died in Akron, Ohio. He was one of the earliest black player in the American League, playing first with the Cleveland Indians in 1951. Casey Stengel once called him the best defensive right fielder in the American League.[1]

That his nickname of "Suitcase" came from his being frequently traded during his playing career is a common misconception. According to the 1951 Cleveland Indians Sketch Book, he was called "Suitcase" by sportswriters after the Toonerville Trolley character, Suitcase Simpson, because of his size 13 shoe with feet as large as suitcases. This is years before his many trades. His real nickname was "Goody", which came from his willingness to run errands and help neighbors in his hometown of Dalton, Georgia.[2]

In popular culture[edit]

The character Luther "Suitcase" Simpson in the Jesse Stone novels, and made for TV movies, by author Robert B. Parker, is given the nickname "Suitcase" or "Suit", by the character of the police chief played by Tom Selleck because of Harry Simpson.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cleveland Indians Official 1952 Sketch Book.
  2. ^ Cleveland Indians Official 1951 Sketch Book.