Harry Stonecipher

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Harry C. Stonecipher
Born (1936-05-16) May 16, 1936 (age 78)
Robbins, Tennessee, U.S.
Education Bachelor of Science in Physics, Tennessee Technological University
Title President and Chief Executive Officer, Boeing
Term 2003–2005[1]

Harry C. Stonecipher (born May 16, 1936) is a former president and chief executive of American aerospace companies McDonnell Douglas and, later, Boeing. Stonecipher orchestrated the merger between McDonnell Douglas and Boeing, and was widely credited with the resurgence of Boeing. After a long and distinguished career, Stonecipher was forced to resign at Boeing following the disclosure of his longtime consensual affair with a fellow Boeing employee, who was not a direct report and whom he later married. In October 2010, Stonecipher joined the board of directors of iControl Systems USA, LLC., a privately held company providing data management and accounts payable outsourcing to major American retailers.

Biography[edit]

Stonecipher was born in Robbins, Tennessee.[2] In 1960, he graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in physics at the Tennessee Technological University.

Stonecipher began his career at General Motors' Allison Division, where he worked as a lab technician and was influenced by Jack Welch.[3] He moved to General Electric's Large Engine Division in 1960, and began to move up the ranks. He became a vice president at GE in 1979, then a division head in 1984. In 1987 he left for Sundstrand, where he became president and CEO in 1989.[2]

McDonnell Douglas[edit]

In September 1994, Stonecipher was elected president and CEO of McDonnell Douglas, holding this post until its merger with Boeing in 1997. During this period he became much more of a public figure, and even began hosting the company's quarterly video report. He remained on the board following the successful completion of that transaction, serving as president and COO (chief operating officer). In 2001, he was elected vice chairman and retired the next year, while continuing to serve on the board as vice chairman.[2]

Boeing[edit]

Stonecipher came out of retirement to lead Boeing, following the resignation of Chairman and CEO Phil Condit in December 2003 over several scandals. These scandals surrounded allegations of documents stolen from competitors and the hiring of a government procurement officer who at the time was involved in the United States Air Force's KC-767 contract. Stonecipher assumed the titles of president and CEO, which was not considered an interim appointment as there was no search initiated for a new chief executive, while Lewis Platt became non-executive chairman of the board.[4]

Under Stonecipher's tenure, the air force had lifted a 20-month suspension of Boeing's Launching Systems Group, which had been involved in one of the scandals, allowing them to bid on Pentagon contracts again.[5] He also oversaw the launch of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner in order to challenge Airbus.[6] Shares of the company traded as high as $58.74 in 2005, up 54 percent during his tenure.[7]

Stonecipher submitted his resignation upon request of the Boeing Board of Directors on March 6, 2005, due to an improper relationship with Boeing executive Debra Peabody. Boeing said an internal investigation revealed a "consensual" relationship between Stonecipher and the female executive that "would impair his ability to lead the company". His wife of 50 years, Joan Stonecipher, filed for divorce just days after news of his affair became public.[8] Chief Financial Officer James A. Bell succeeded him as president and chief executive.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Harry C. Stonecipher". Boeing. Retrieved 2013-04-17. 
  2. ^ a b c "Ex-Boeing CEO Harry Stonecipher at a Glance". Los Angeles Times. 7 March 2005. Retrieved 2013-04-17. 
  3. ^ "Harry C. Stonecipher". Encyclopedia of Business. Advameg, Inc. Retrieved 2013-04-17. 
  4. ^ "Boeing: What Really Happened". Business Week. 2003-12-15. Retrieved 2009-06-30. 
  5. ^ Wayne, Leslie (9 February 2005). "Boeing Could Soon Settle Ethics Inquiries, Chief Says". The New York Times. 
  6. ^ Landler, Mark (23 July 2004). "At Air Show, Echoes of Boeing's New Assertiveness in Duel With Airbus". The New York Times. 
  7. ^ Norris, Floyd (8 March 2005). "Boeing's Road to Redemption Paved With Affairs Great and Small". The New York Times. 
  8. ^ "The Affair That Grounded Stonecipher". 8 March 2005. Retrieved 10 December 2008. 

External links[edit]

Business positions
Preceded by
Phil Condit
CEO of Boeing
2003-2005
Succeeded by
James A. Bell