Hasbrouck Heights, New Jersey

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Hasbrouck Heights, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Hasbrouck Heights
The Bendix Diner, a prominent landmark on Route 17
The Bendix Diner, a prominent landmark on Route 17
Map highlighting Hasbrouck Heights' location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Map highlighting Hasbrouck Heights' location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hasbrouck Heights, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hasbrouck Heights, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°51′46″N 74°04′31″W / 40.862751°N 74.075182°W / 40.862751; -74.075182Coordinates: 40°51′46″N 74°04′31″W / 40.862751°N 74.075182°W / 40.862751; -74.075182[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Bergen
Incorporated July 31, 1894
Government[6]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Rose Marie Heck (R, term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator Michael Kronyak[4]
 • Clerk Rose Marie Sees[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 1.510 sq mi (3.910 km2)
 • Land 1.506 sq mi (3.899 km2)
 • Water 0.004 sq mi (0.010 km2)  0.26%
Area rank 450th of 566 in state
58th of 70 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 112 ft (34 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 11,842
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 11,936
 • Rank 205th of 566 in state
27th of 70 in county[12]
 • Density 7,865.4/sq mi (3,036.8/km2)
 • Density rank 47th of 566 in state
13th of 70 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07604[13][14]
Area code(s) 201 exchanges: 288, 393, 462, 727[15]
FIPS code 3400330420[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885247[18][2]
Website www.hasbrouck-heights.nj.us

Hasbrouck Heights (pronounced HAZ-brook[19]) is a borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 11,842,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 180 (+1.5%) from the 11,662 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 174 (+1.5%) from the 11,488 counted in the 1990 Census.[20] An inner-ring suburb of New York City, Hasbrouck Heights is located approximately 10 miles (16 km) northwest of Midtown Manhattan and 8 miles (13 km) west of Upper Manhattan.

Hasbrouck Heights was formed by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on August 2, 1894, based on the passage of a referendum on July 31, 1894, and was created from portions of Lodi Township at the height of the "Boroughitis" phenomenon then sweeping through Bergen County.[21][22] A part of the borough was annexed to Lodi in 1901.[23]

Geography[edit]

Hasbrouck Heights is located at 40°51′46″N 74°04′31″W / 40.862751°N 74.075182°W / 40.862751; -74.075182 (40.862751,-74.075182). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.510 square miles (3.910 km2), of which, 1.506 square miles (3.899 km2) of it was land and 0.004 square miles (0.010 km2) of it (0.26%) was water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 1,255
1910 2,155 71.7%
1920 2,895 34.3%
1930 5,658 95.4%
1940 6,716 18.7%
1950 9,181 36.7%
1960 13,046 42.1%
1970 13,651 4.6%
1980 12,166 −10.9%
1990 11,488 −5.6%
2000 11,662 1.5%
2010 11,842 1.5%
Est. 2012 11,936 [11] 0.8%
Population sources:
1900-1920[24] 1900-1910[25]
1910-1930[26] 1900-2010[27][28][29]
2000[30][31] 2010[8][9][10]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 11,842 people, 4,433 households, and 3,187 families residing in the borough. The population density was 7,865.4 per square mile (3,036.8 /km2). There were 4,627 housing units at an average density of 3,073.2 per square mile (1,186.6 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 81.34% (9,632) White, 2.86% (339) Black or African American, 0.08% (9) Native American, 9.99% (1,183) Asian, 0.02% (2) Pacific Islander, 3.68% (436) from other races, and 2.04% (241) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 14.86% (1,760) of the population.[8]

There were 4,433 households, of which 31.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.4% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.1% were non-families. 24.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.67 and the average family size was 3.22.[8] Same-sex couples headed 9 households in 2010, less than half of the 19 counted in 2000.[32]

In the borough, 22.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 25.8% from 25 to 44, 29.9% from 45 to 64, and 15.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.8 years. For every 100 females there were 92.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.4 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $88,375 (with a margin of error of +/- $7,467) and the median family income was $100,264 (+/- $9,917). Males had a median income of $60,618 (+/- $5,446) versus $47,385 (+/- $6,455) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $37,428 (+/- $3,231). About 3.6% of families and 3.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.6% of those under age 18 and 5.1% of those age 65 or over.[33]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 11,662 people, 4,521 households, and 3,142 families residing in the borough. The population density was 7,735.0 people per square mile (2,981.9/km2). There were 4,617 housing units at an average density of 3,062.3 per square mile (1,180.6/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 87.87% White, 1.71% African American, 0.04% Native American, 6.65% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 2.19% from other races, and 1.53% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.27% of the population.[30][31]

There were 4,521 households out of which 30.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.1% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.5% were non-families. 26.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.16.[30][31]

In the borough the population was spread out with 22.2% under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 29.9% from 25 to 44, 24.4% from 45 to 64, and 17.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 92.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.6 males.[30][31]

The median income for a household in the borough was $64,529, and the median income for a family was $75,032. Males had a median income of $51,328 versus $40,570 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $29,626. About 2.1% of families and 4.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.5% of those under age 18 and 4.5% of those age 65 or over.[30][31]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Borough Hall (January 2009)

Hasbrouck Heights is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[6] The Borough form of government, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[34]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Hasbrouck Heights is Republican Rose Marie Heck, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015. Members of the Hasbrouck Heights Borough Council (with party affliaition, term-end year and committee chairmanship listed in parentheses) are Council President Pamela J. Link (R, 2014; Finance / Social Services and Welfare), Sonya C. Buckman (R, 2013; Recreation and Parks), Justin A. DiPisa (R, 2014; Police), David P. Gonzalez (R, 2013; Fire, Streets, Sanitation), Russell Lipari (R, 2015; Health and Land Use) and Christian Semenecz (D, 2015; Public Facilities and Transportation).[35][36][37][38][39][40][41][42]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Hasbrouck Heights is located in the 9th Congressional District[43] and is part of New Jersey's 38th state legislative district.[9][44][45]

New Jersey's Ninth Congressional District is represented by Bill Pascrell (D, Paterson).[46] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[47][48] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[49][50]

The 38th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Robert M. Gordon (D, Fair Lawn) and in the General Assembly by Tim Eustace (D, Maywood) and Joseph Lagana (D, Paramus).[51][52] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[53] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[54]

Bergen County is governed by a directly elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders.[55] The County Executive is Kathleen Donovan (R, Rutherford; term ends December 31, 2014).[56] The seven freeholders are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year, with a Chairman, Vice Chairman and Chairman Pro Tempore selected from among its members at a reorganization meeting held each January.[57] As of 2014, Bergen County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chairman David L. Ganz (D, 2014; Fair Lawn),[58] Vice Chairwoman Joan Voss (D, 2014; Fort Lee),[59] Chairman Pro Tempore John A. Felice (R, 2016; River Edge),[60] Maura R. DeNicola (R, 2016; Franklin Lakes),[61] Steve Tanelli (D, 2015; North Arlington)[62] James J. Tedesco, III (D, 2015; Paramus)[63] and Tracy Silna Zur (D, 2015; Franklin Lakes).[64][65] Countywide constitutional officials are County Clerk John S. Hogan (D, Northvale),[66] Sheriff Michael Saudino (R),[67] Surrogate Michael R. Dressler (D, Cresskill)[68][69][55]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 7,221 registered voters in Hasbrouck Heights, of which 1,630 (22.6% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 2,549 (35.3% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 3,040 (42.1% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2 voters registered to other parties.[70] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 61.0% (vs. 57.1% in Bergen County) were registered to vote, including 78.4% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).[70][71]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 2,883 votes here (51.1% vs. 54.8% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 2,669 votes (47.3% vs. 43.5%) and other candidates with 43 votes (0.8% vs. 0.9%), among the 5,640 ballots cast by the borough's 7,558 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.6% (vs. 70.4% in Bergen County).[72][73] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 3,218 votes here (52.9% vs. 44.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 2,772 votes (45.5% vs. 53.9%) and other candidates with 48 votes (0.8% vs. 0.8%), among the 6,087 ballots cast by the borough's 7,612 registered voters, for a turnout of 80.0% (vs. 76.8% in Bergen County).[74][75] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 3,066 votes here (53.2% vs. 47.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 2,629 votes (45.6% vs. 51.7%) and other candidates with 53 votes (0.9% vs. 0.7%), among the 5,768 ballots cast by the borough's 7,345 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.5% (vs. 76.9% in the whole county).[76]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 2,037 votes here (51.7% vs. 45.8% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 1,663 votes (42.2% vs. 48.0%), Independent Chris Daggett with 181 votes (4.6% vs. 4.7%) and other candidates with 24 votes (0.6% vs. 0.5%), among the 3,937 ballots cast by the borough's 7,449 registered voters, yielding a 52.9% turnout (vs. 50.0% in the county).[77]

Education[edit]

The Hasbrouck Heights School District serves public school students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. The district also serves students from Teterboro, a non-operating district that was merged into the Hasbrouck Heights School District following its dissolution on July 1, 2010.[78] Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[79]) include two K-5 elementary schools — Euclid Elementary School[80] (384 students) and Lincoln Elementary School[81] (420) — Hasbrouck Heights Middle School[82] for grades 6-8 (412) and Hasbrouck Heights High School[83] for grades 9-12 (481).[84]

Public school students from the borough, and all of Bergen County, are eligible to attend the secondary education programs offered by the Bergen County Technical Schools, which include the Bergen County Academies in Hackensack, and the Bergen Tech campus in Teterboro or Paramus. The district offers programs on a shared-time or full-time basis, with admission based on a selective application process and tuition covered by the student's home school district.[85][86]

Transportation[edit]

The borough had a total of 36.64 miles (58.97 km) of roadways, of which 29.29 miles (47.14 km) are maintained by the municipality, 4.78 miles (7.69 km) by Bergen County and 2.57 miles (4.14 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[87]

Route 17 and U.S. Route 46 both pass through Hasbrouck Heights.

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit bus routes 161, 163 and 164 provide service to and from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan; the 76 line serves Newark; and local service is offered on the 709 and 780 routes.[88]

NJ Transit provides rail service via the Pascack Valley Line's Teterboro - Williams Avenue station, which is located on the eastern boundary with Teterboro, just across the tracks from the Williams Avenue dead end in Hasbrouck Heights. Although the rail line's tracks lie entirely within the municipal boundaries of Hasbrouck Heights, and in fact form the borough's eastern boundary with Teterboro, NJ Transit considers the station to be in Teterboro because passenger boarding, passenger shelter, parking lot, and ingress/egress roads are accessed from that town.[89][90]

In January 2013, NJ Transit erected a 300-foot (91 m) chain link fence in the vicinity of the Williams Avenue dead end as a safety measure to prevent pedestrians/commuters from illegally crossing over the tracks to gain access to the trains on the Teterboro side. Hasbrouck Heights Mayor Rose Marie Heck, NJ Assemblyman Tim Eustace, and Hasbrouck Heights commuters have tried to work with New Jersey Transit to find alternative solutions, including installation of a pedestrian rail crossing with swing gates and warning lights. NJ Transit has indicated there are no immediate alternatives available since funding is not available.[91][92][93]

Teterboro Airport is located proximate to the eastern border with Hasbrouck Heights.[90][94]

Notable events[edit]

  • 1664 - Settled
  • 1894 - Incorporated
  • 1896 - Volunteer fire department established
  • 1935 - (May 19) Small biplane loses altitude after taking off from Teterboro Airport, and drops directly in front of automobile on Route 2 (now Route 17). Driver of automobile only bruised after crash, pilot and student co-pilot severely injured.
  • 1966 - (June 29) Pilot James P. Scott crash-lands his Piper Aztec twin-engine plane on front lawn of Burton Avenue home after losing an engine and skimming the top of a tree, which softened his landing. The plane slid up the driveway and struck the house. The residents were not at home, and the pilot survived.
  • 1999 - (December 9) A Beechcraft Baron bound from Virginia for neighboring Teterboro Airport crashed in a backyard. All four people passengers aboard the plane died, no injuries occurred on the ground.[95]
  • 1999 - (December 10) The Municipal Building (town hall, town court, fire department, police department) catches fire. The cause of the blaze was found to be an electrical problem. A new building was built on the Boulevard and Central and dedicated on December 14, 2003.
  • 2006 - (June) The public library director Michele Reutty was in the news for not providing information to the town police when they turned up at the library without a subpoena.[96] This event drew widespread attention via a Slashdot article.[97]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Hasbrouck Heights include:

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Municipal Administrator, Borough of Hasbrouck Heights. Accessed August 16, 2013.
  5. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Hasbrouck Heights. Accessed August 16, 2013.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 160.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Hasbrouck Heights, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Hasbrouck Heights borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 15. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Hasbrouck Heights borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Hasbrouck Heights, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed December 14, 2011.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 16, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Hasbrouck Heights, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed December 8, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed June 4, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Staff. "Hasbrouck Heights", The Columbia Viking Desk Encyclopedia, p. 459. Viking Press, 1968. Accessed August 16, 2013.
  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  21. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 79. Accessed June 4, 2012.
  22. ^ "History of Bergen County" Vol. 1, p. 367-370.
  23. ^ Municipal Incorporations of the State of New Jersey, p. 11 note 21.
  24. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed August 16, 2013.
  25. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed June 4, 2012.
  26. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed December 14, 2011.
  27. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed December 14, 2011./{{{url}}} Archive copy] at the Wayback Machine
  28. ^ Bergen County Data Book 2003, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed August 16, 2013.
  29. ^ Historical Population Trends in Bergen County (1900-2010), Bergen County Department of Planning & Economic Development, 2011. Accessed December 8, 2013.
  30. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Hasbrouck Heights borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 8, 2013.
  31. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Hasbrouck Heights borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 8, 2013.
  32. ^ Lipman, Harvy; and Sheingold, Dave. "North Jersey sees 30% growth in same-sex couples", The Record (Bergen County), August 14, 2011. Accessed July 26, 2013.
  33. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Hasbrouck Heights borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 4, 2012.
  34. ^ Cerra, Michael F. "Forms of Government: Everything You've Always Wanted to Know,But Were Afraid to Ask", New Jersey State League of Municipalities. Accessed December 8, 2013.
  35. ^ Mayor & Council, Borough of Hasbrouck Heights. Accessed December 8, 2013.
  36. ^ 2013 Municipal Data Sheet, Borough of Hasbrouck Heights. Accessed December 8, 2013.
  37. ^ Bergen County 2012 - 2013, Bergen County, New Jersey, p. 46. Accessed June 8, 2013. Does not reflect results of 2012 election for council members.
  38. ^ Bergen County Statement of Vote General Election 2012, Bergen County Clerk, November 6, 2012. Accessed December 7, 2013.
  39. ^ Bergen County Statement of Vote General Election 2011, Bergen County Clerk, November 17, 2011. Accessed December 7, 2013.
  40. ^ Bergen County Statement of Vote General Election 2010, Bergen County Clerk, November 10, 2010. Accessed December 7, 2013.
  41. ^ Cattafi, Kristie. "Republican incumbents sweep in Hasbrouck Heights", Community News, November 8, 2011. Accessed June 4, 2012. "Mayor Rose Marie Heck defeated Independent candidate Dragan Blanusa, 1,418 to 482. Republican Councilwoman Pamela Link and Republican Councilman Justin DiPisa beat Democratic candidates, Mary Blanusa and Doris Tuosto, and one independent challenger, Carol Skiba, for two, three-year terms on the Hasbrouck Heights Council."
  42. ^ Voter History - 2012 General Election OFFICIAL Results, Bergen County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed June 8, 2013.
  43. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  44. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 58, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  45. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  46. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  47. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  48. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  49. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  50. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  51. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  52. ^ District 38, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  53. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  54. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  55. ^ a b 2014 County and Municipal Directory, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  56. ^ County Executive, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014
  57. ^ Freeholders, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  58. ^ David L. Ganz, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  59. ^ Joan M. Voss, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  60. ^ John A. Felice, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  61. ^ Maura R. DeNicola, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  62. ^ Steve Tanelli, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  63. ^ James, J. Tedesco, III, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  64. ^ Tracy Silna Zur, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  65. ^ Freeholder Board, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  66. ^ About the Clerk, Bergen County Clerk. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  67. ^ About Sheriff Michael Saudino, Bergen County Sheriff's Office. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  68. ^ Michael R. Dressler, Bergen County Surrogate's Court. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  69. ^ Constitutional Officers, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  70. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Bergen, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 7, 2013.
  71. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 7, 2013.
  72. ^ Presidential November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed December 13, 2013.
  73. ^ Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed December 13, 2013.
  74. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 7, 2013.
  75. ^ 2008 General Election Results for Hasbrouck Heights, The Record (Bergen County). Accessed December 14, 2011.
  76. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 7, 2013.
  77. ^ 2009 Governor: Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 7, 2013.
  78. ^ Graham, Dr. Aaron R. Bergen County Report on Consolidation and Regionalization, Bergen County Executive County Superintendent, March 15, 2010. Accessed June 15, 2011. "Hasbrouck Heights (PK-12) and Teterboro (non-op):The two districts will form the newly merged district of Hasbrouck Heights with Teterboro, a non-operating district scheduled for elimination on July 1, 2010."
  79. ^ School Data for the Hasbrouck Heights School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed August 15, 2013.
  80. ^ Euclid Elementary School, Hasbrouck Heights School District. Accessed August 16, 2013.
  81. ^ Lincoln Elementary School, Hasbrouck Heights School District. Accessed August 16, 2013.
  82. ^ Hasbrouck Heights Middle School, Hasbrouck Heights School District. Accessed August 16, 2013.
  83. ^ Hasbrouck Heights High School, Hasbrouck Heights School District. Accessed August 16, 2013.
  84. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Hasbrouck Heights School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 15, 2013.
  85. ^ About Us, Bergen County Technical Schools. Accessed December 8, 2013.
  86. ^ Admissions, Bergen County Technical Schools. Accessed December 8, 2013.
  87. ^ Bergen County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed December 8, 2013.
  88. ^ Routes by County: Bergen County at the Wayback Machine (archived October 23, 2010), New Jersey Transit. Accessed June 4, 2012.
  89. ^ "Teterboro" (PDF). New Jersey Transit. Retrieved September 26, 2013. 
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  96. ^ Staff. "Library chief draws cops' ire", The Record (Bergen County), June 22, 2006. Accessed December 8, 2013 ."HASBROUCK HEIGHTS Library Director Michele Reutty is under fire for refusing to give police library circulation records without a subpoena."
  97. ^ Slashdot: Library Chief Criticized for Requiring Subpoena
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  111. ^ Rohan, Virginia. "Awake: Bergen man stars in new NBC drama", Bergen.com, February 29, 2012. Accessed December 8, 2013. "You might call the path that led actor Jay Seals to Awake – the NBC drama that premieres on Thursday – Three Degrees of Mad Men. After the Hasbrouck Heights native landed a role as an ad client in the AMC hit's fourth-season finale, that show's casting directors hired him to be a 'reader' on Metro, an NBC pilot from Oscar-winning writer Stephen Gaghan (Traffic)."
  112. ^ "The Kid from Hoboken", Time (Magazine), August 29, 1955. Accessed June 4, 2007. "Even at home, Sinatra was not safe. His house in Hasbrouck Heights, N.J. was ringed all day and half the night by gazing girldom. Originally white, its sides were soon smeared with lipstick. Sometimes the girls made human ladders and peered into his bedroom, and when he got a haircut the clippings were claimed."
  113. ^ Eskanazi, Gerald. "PRO FOOTBALL; From the Marine Corps To the Tight Ends Corps", The New York Times, August 21, 2001. Accessed March 7, 2011. "Becht's backup will most likely be Scott Slutzker, who began his pro career with the Colts in 1996 and is in his first season with the Jets. He grew up a Giants fan in Hasbrouck Heights, N.J."
  114. ^ Scott Slutzker, Pro-Football-Reference. Accessed September 24, 2008.

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