Hasma

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Hasma
DriedHasma.jpg
Dried Hasma sold in a box
Alternative name(s) Harsmar, hashima, toad oil
Place of origin China
Region or state Heilongjiang, Jilin, and Liaoning
Main ingredient(s) Fatty tissue found near the fallopian tubes of true frogs
Hasma
Chinese 1.
2.
Alternative Chinese name
Chinese

Hasma (Harsmar, Hashima) is a Chinese and widely Central Asian dessert ingredient made from the dried fatty tissue found near the fallopian tubes of true frogs, typically the Asiatic Grass Frog (Rana chensinensis). Hasma is often mistakenly described as toad or frog fat, since it is sometimes referred to as "toad oil" (Chinese: 蛤蟆油; pinyin: há mǎ yóu). The Western pharmaceutical term is Oviductus Ranae.

Production[edit]

Hasma is produced primarily in the Heilongjiang, Jilin, and Liaoning provinces in China. Previously available only to Emperors, soups made with hasma are available in North American cities with large Chinese populations and in China, Taiwan, Singapore and Hong Kong.

Physical characteristics[edit]

Hasma is sold dried as irregular flat pieces and flakes ranging from 1–2 cm in length and 1–5 mm in thickness. Individual pieces are yellowish-white in colour with a matte lustre, whose surface may be covered with off-white pellicles. When rehydrated, dried hasma can expand up to 10-15 times in size.

The dried hasma is rehydrated and double-boiled with rock sugar to create a glutinous texture and opaque color. Dried or rehydrated hasma has a slight fishy smell. In its unflavoured form it is sweet and slightly savory in taste with a texture that is glutinous, chewy, and light, very similar to that of tapioca in a dessert.

Preparation[edit]

Hasma cooked with jujubes fruits

Hasma serves the role of providing texture to tong sui, or sweet soups, as well as increasing the perceived luxuriousness of the soup. These soups are usually flavoured with rock sugar. For the uninitiated, this relatively accessible eating experience belies the exotic sounding nature of the dessert. Hasma is widely featured in dessert dishes in high class restaurants in Hong Kong.

Hasma is most commonly paired in sweet soups with:

It is also a key ingredient in making "Three snow soup" (Chinese: 三雪湯; pinyin: sān xuě tāng), which consists of:

Hasma can also be included in more exotic versions of shark fin soup.

Health benefits[edit]

Hasma is taken for medicinal purposes in Traditional Chinese medicine. Reported benefits of eating hasma include replenishing vital essence in the lungs, kidneys, and improving skin complexion. Hasma is also prescribed to treat respiratory symptoms such as coughing, hemoptysis and night sweats due to tuberculosis. Young children are however not recommended to take it, as the high contents of hormones might cause puberty to begin early.[1]

References[edit]

External links[edit]