Hawaii's congressional districts

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Hawaii's Congressional districts since 2013.[1]

The U.S. state of Hawaii is divided into two congressional districts for representation in the United States House of Representatives.

History[edit]

Before statehood, the Territory of Hawaii was represented by a non-voting delegate.

From statehood until 1963, Hawaii had one representative. From 1963 to the creation of the two districts in 1971, Hawaii was represented in the United States House of Representatives with two representatives elected at-large state-wide.

1st district[edit]

Map of the 1st congressional district

The First congressional district is far smaller in area and has a much denser population than the 2nd district. Covering the southeastern parts of the City & County of Honolulu, including downtown Honolulu, the district was represented by Neil Abercrombie from 1991 until his resignation in February 2010. Republican Charles Djou won a special election on May 22, 2010 against Democrats Colleen Hanabusa and Ed Case to become the first Republican in over 20 years to represent the 1st district and to represent President Obama's home district. On November 2, 2010, Hanabusa defeated Djou and is the United States Representative for Hawaii's 1st congressional district.[2]

2nd district[edit]

Map of the 2nd congressional district

The 2nd congressional district is far more spread out than the First district. Including northern and western Oahu, along with the entirety of the state's other islands, the district includes Kauai, Maui, and Hawaii counties, along with part of Honolulu County. The entire district spans 331 miles (533 km) and comprises small towns with historical roots in the pineapple and sugarcane plantations. It has been represented by Tulsi Gabbard since 2013.[citation needed]

Historical district boundaries[edit]

2003 - 2013

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The national atlas". nationalatlas.gov. Retrieved February 22, 2014. 
  2. ^ Goodin, Emily (November 3, 2010). "Dems pick up Hawaii seat". The Hill.