Hawaiian Ecosystems at Risk project

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The Hawaiian Ecosystems at Risk project (HEAR) is a government-funded project created to provide technology, methods, and information to decision-makers, resource managers, and the general public to help support effective science-based management of harmful non-native species (invasive species) in Hawaii and the Pacific Rim.

Origin and history[edit]

HEAR originated at the Haleakala Field Station[1] (Maui, Hawaii) of the Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center (PIERC) of the USGS's Biological Resources Division (formerly the National Biological Service) through the Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit (PSCU) based at the University of Hawaii Department of Botany.[2]

Funding and support[edit]

As of late 2012, the Hawaiian Ecosystems at Risk project is funded by the Hauoli Mau Loa Foundation and the U.S. Forest Service with support from the Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit (PCSU) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Historically, HEAR has also received funding and/or support from the Pacific Basin Information Node (PBIN) of the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII) through the Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center of USGS, the Hawaii Conservation Studies Unit (HCSU) of the University of Hawaii at Hilo, Haleakala National Park, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Partnerships[edit]

The Hawaiian Ecosystems at Risk project (HEAR) functions by working collaboratively as a partnership with other organizations, including (but not limited to):

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Haleakala Field Station
  2. ^ More details about HEAR's creation and history are available in an article published in Conservation In Practice

External links[edit]