Hayato people

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The Hayato (隼人?), literal meaning falcon-man,[1] were a people of ancient Japan, believed to have lived in Ōsumi region,[2] the south of Kyūshū, until at least the Nara period. Some scholars suggest that the Hayato people were closely related to Malay/Polynesian people.[3] The Kumaso may have been a related group.[citation needed] The Kagoshima dialect of Japanese might show influences of the Hayato language.

The Imperial Guard was constituted by the Hayato.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ William George Aston says this in his note, see Nihongi: Chronicles of Japan from the Earliest Times to A.D. 697, translated from the original Chinese and Japanese by William George Aston. Book II, note 1, page 100. Tuttle Publishing. Tra edition (July 2005). First edition published 1972. ISBN 978-0-8048-3674-6
  2. ^ William George Aston says this in his note, see Nihongi: Chronicles of Japan from the Earliest Times to A.D. 697, translated from the original Chinese and Japanese by William George Aston. Book II, note 1, page 100. Tuttle Publishing. Tra edition (July 2005). First edition published 1972. ISBN 978-0-8048-3674-6
  3. ^ Kakubayashi, Fumio. 隼人 : オーストロネシア系の古代日本部族' Hayato : An Austronesian speaking tribe in southern Japan.'. The bulletin of the Institute for Japanese Culture, Kyoto Sangyo University, 3, pp.15-31 ISSN:13417207.
  4. ^ William George Aston says this in his note, see Nihongi: Chronicles of Japan from the Earliest Times to A.D. 697, translated from the original Chinese and Japanese by William George Aston. Book II, note 1, page 100. Tuttle Publishing. Tra edition (July 2005). First edition published 1972. ISBN 978-0-8048-3674-6