Hayyim ben Jacob Abulafia

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Abulafia Synagogue, Tiberias

Hayyim ben Jacob Abulafia (born 1660 in Hebron, d.1744 in Tiberias), Ottoman Syria) was a rabbinical authority. He was the grandfather of Hayyim ben David Abulafia and grandson of Isaac Nissim aben Gamil. Abulafia was a rabbi in Smyrna, where he instituted many wholesome regulations. In his old age (1740) he restored the Jewish community in Tiberias.[1]

The tomb of Rabbi Abulafia in the old cemetery of Tiberias.

He is the author of several works:

  1. "Mikrae kodesh" (Holy Convocations), Smyrna, 1729, containing treatises on Biblical and Talmudical themes;
  2. "Yosef Lemad" (Increase of Learning), Smyrna, 1730–32, a work in three volumes on the Pentateuch;
  3. "Yashresh Ya'akob" (Jacob Will Take Root), Smyrna, 1729; and
  4. "Shebut Ya'akob" (The Captivity of Jacob), Smyrna, 1733, an elaborate commentary on the haggadic compilation "'Ein Yaakov," by Jacob ibn Habib and others.

Jewish Encyclopedia bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ J. Barnay, The Jews in Palestine in the eighteenth century, Uni of Alabama Press, 1990 p.149