Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference

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The Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference
HMC Logo new.png
Abbreviation HMC
Formation 1869
Type Non-governmental organisation
Purpose Educational accreditation
Location Market Harborough, Leicestershire
Region served
United Kingdom
Membership 252 schools
General Secretary
William Richardson[1]
Affiliations ISC
Website hmc.org.uk

The Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference (HMC) is an association of the headmasters or headmistresses of 243 independent schools (both boarding schools and day schools) in the United Kingdom, Crown Dependencies and the Republic of Ireland. There are also International Members (mostly from the Commonwealth) and a number of Additional Members who are elected as the head teachers of a limited number of state schools.

History[edit]

The Conference dates from 1869 when Edward Thring, Headmaster of Uppingham, asked sixty to seventy of his fellow headmasters[2][3] to meet at his house to consider the formation of a "School Society and Annual Conference".[4] Fourteen accepted the invitation,[2] and twelve were present for the whole of the initial meeting,[5] and from that date there have been annual meetings. It changed its name from the "Headmasters' Conference" to the "Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference" in 1996.[5] The current Chairman is Dr Christopher Ray, former High Master of The Manchester Grammar School, and the current general secretary is Dr William Richardson.

Membership of the HMC is often considered to be what defines a school as a public school in England and Wales.[6][7] Not all private, independent schools are in the HMC; in particular, many notable girls' schools, including Cheltenham Ladies' College, St Swithun's School, Wycombe Abbey and Benenden School, are not members, partly because historically the HMC was for boys' schools only. The large number of coeducational member schools are mostly historically boys' school or have resulted from a merger between a boys' school and a girls' school.

Structure[edit]

The size of the Conference has grown. As late as the 1970s, membership was confined to 200 schools.

Chairmen of the Headmasters' Conference (HMC)[edit]

Chairmen of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference (HMC)[edit]

List of HMC member schools[edit]

The following are the member schools, listed with their headmaster or headmistress. In some schools other titles are used, such as "High Master", "Warden", "Rector" and "Principal".

England[edit]

Scotland[edit]

Wales[edit]

Northern Ireland[edit]

Guernsey[edit]

Jersey[edit]

Isle of Man[edit]

Republic of Ireland[edit]

International Members[edit]

Africa[edit]

Canada[edit]

Latin America[edit]

Europe[edit]

Middle East[edit]

Australia[edit]

New Zealand[edit]

Pakistan[edit]

India[edit]

South East Asia[edit]

Additional members[edit]

HMC Projects in Central and Eastern Europe[edit]

HMC Projects in Central and Eastern Europe is a charity offering opportunities for students and young teachers from Central and Eastern Europe to develop themselves, by coming to HMC member schools in UK for a year.
It began as a part of HMC Projects in 1992 and, so far has offered more than 2000 young people opportunities to respectively either study or teach in the UK.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Contact HMC at hmc.org.uk, accessed 18 March 2012
  2. ^ a b Leinster-Mackay, Donald P. The educational world of Edward Thring: a centenary study, Falmer Press, 1987, ISBN 1-85000-253-3, ISBN 978-1-85000-253-6. p. 100
  3. ^ Other sources including some Headmasters' Conference papers say "Uppingham asked thirty-seven of his fellow headmasters ..." (Headmasters' Conference. Independent schools yearbook: Official book of reference at the Headmasters' Conference ..., A & C Black, 1987 p. xlv)
  4. ^ Headmasters' Conference, The Public and preparatory schools year book, Adam & Charles Black, 1968 p. 3
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Edward Thring (Uppingham School), (Bromsgrove School), (Bury St Edmunds), (The King's School, Canterbury), (Felsted School), (Lancing College), (Liverpool College), (Norwich School), (Oakham School), (Repton School), (Richmond), (Sherborne School) and (Tonbridge School).( Source "The public schools and the general educational system: Report of the Committee on public schools appointed by the president of the Board of education in July 1942, Volume 1942, Part 3", H. M. Stationery Off., 1944, p. 29)
  6. ^ Tony Halpin Public schools plead to be let off fines over fee-fixing in The Times 1 October 2005 "The Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference of leading public schools is due to hold its annual conference next week."
  7. ^ "Our Election Manifesto and The Queen's Speech both speak of 'public schools'. The only practicable definition of these (which was broadly that used by the Fleming Committee (The Public Schools and the general education system. Report of the Committee on Public School Appointed by the President of the Board of Education in July 1942. Published 1944)) is 'schools now in membership of the Headmasters Conference, Governing Bodies Association or Governing Bodies of Girls' Schools Association'"(Public Schools: Memorandum by the Sectary of State for Education and Science, 19 November 1965, p. 1) 
  8. ^ 'Alington, Cyril Argentine' in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (OUP, 2007)
  9. ^ 'LEE, Sir (Henry) Desmond (Pritchard)', in Who Was Who 1996–2000 (London: A. & C. Black, 2001, ISBN 0-7136-5439-2)
  10. ^ Tim Devlin, "Heads see big demand for more independent schools despite Labour threat to end benefits", in The Times dated 1 October 1974, p. 2
  11. ^ 'BAGGLEY, (Charles) David (Aubrey)', in Who's Who 1999 (London: A. & C. Black, 1998)
  12. ^ 'Thorn, John Leonard (born 28 April 1925)' in Who's Who 2011 (London: A. & C. Black)
  13. ^ 'ELLIS, Roger Wykeham', in Who's Who 2012 (London: A. & C. Black, 2011)
  14. ^ 'EMMS, David Acfield', in Who's Who 2012 (London: A. & C. Black, 2011)
  15. ^ 'ALLAN, George Alexander (born 3 Feb. 1936)' in Who's Who 2012 (London: A. & C. Black, 2012)
  16. ^ 'WRIGHT, Hugh Raymond', in Who's Who 2007 (London: A. & C. Black, 2007)
  17. ^ Brace, Alison (12 January 2001). "We are not elitist, says public school leader". Times Educational Supplement Newspaper. Retrieved 6 December 2013. 
  18. ^ 'CHADWICK, Dr Priscilla', in Who's Who 2012 (London: A. & C. Black, 2011)
  19. ^ 'BOGGIS, Andrew Gurdon', in Who's Who 2012 (London: A. & C. Black, 2011)
  20. ^ 'GRANT, Andrew RobertJohn', in Who's Who 2012 (London: A. & C. Black, 2011)
  21. ^ 'LEVIN, David Roger', in Who's Who 2012 (London: A. & C. Black, 2011)
  22. ^ 'DURHAM, Kenneth John', in Who's Who 2012 (London: A. & C. Black, 2011)
  23. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd HMC Schools A-C at hmc.org.uk, accessed 18 March 2012
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag HMC Schools D-G at hmc.org.uk, accessed 18 March 2012
  25. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba HMC Schools H-L at hmc.org.uk, accessed 18 March 2012
  26. ^ A merger between the all-boys Leeds Grammar School (HMC member) and Leeds Girls' High School
  27. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa HMC Schools M-P at hmc.org.uk, accessed 18 March 2012
  28. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh HMC Schools Q-S at hmc.org.uk, accessed 18 March 2012
  29. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac HMC Schools T-Z at hmc.org.uk, accessed 18 March 2012
  30. ^ Staff List, September 2011 at kwc.im, accessed 22 March 2012
  31. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk HMC Schools: International Members at hmc.org.uk, accessed 18 March 2012
  32. ^ http://www.hmc.org.uk/schools/the-doon-school/
  33. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o HMC Schools: Additional Members at hmc.org.uk, accessed 18 March 2012