Heart of the Congos

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Heart of the Congos
Studio album by The Congos
Released 1977
Recorded 1976–1977, Black Ark, Kingston, Jamaica
Genre Roots reggae
Label Black Ark
Producer Lee Perry
The Congos chronology
Heart of the Congos
(1977)
Congo
(1979)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 5/5 stars link

Heart of the Congos is a roots reggae album by The Congos, produced by Lee "Scratch" Perry at his Black Ark studio with a studio band including Boris Gardiner on bass and Ernest Ranglin on guitar. The album was released in 1977. It is noted as being one of Perry's masterpiece productions of the Black Ark era.

The album was listed in the 1999 book The Rough Guide: Reggae: 100 Essential CDs.[1]

Pitchfork Media ranked the record at #46 on its "Top 100 Albums of the 1970s".[2]

Track listing[edit]

All tracks written by Cedric Myton and Roydel Johnson, except tracks 1 and 2 written by Cedric Myton, Roydel Johnson and Lee Perry.

Side one[edit]

  1. "Fisherman"
  2. "Congoman"
  3. "Open Up the Gate"
  4. "Children Crying"
  5. "La La Bam-Bam"

Side two[edit]

  1. "Can't Come In"
  2. "Sodom and Gomorrow"
  3. "The Wrong Thing"
  4. "Ark of the Covenant"
  5. "Solid Foundation"

CD track listing[edit]

CD one[edit]

  1. "Fisherman"
  2. "Congoman"
  3. "Open up the Gate"
  4. "Children Crying"
  5. "La La Bam-Bam"
  6. "Can't Come In"
  7. "Sodom and Gomorrow"
  8. "The Wrong Thing"
  9. "Ark of the Covenant"
  10. "Solid Foundation"
  11. "At the Feast"
  12. "Nicodemus"

CD two[edit]

  1. "Congoman" (12" mix)
  2. "Congoman Chant"
  3. "Bring the Mackaback"
  4. "Noah Sugar Pan"
  5. "Solid Foundation" (Disco Cork Mix)

Personnel[edit]

Produced by The Congos and Lee "Scratch" Perry. Recorded at the Black Ark 1976–77, Cardiff Crescent, Washington Gardens, Kingston, Jamaica.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Barrow, Steve & Dalton, Peter (1999) Reggae: 100 Essential CDs, Rough Guides, ISBN 1-85828-567-4
  2. ^ Pitchfork staff (23 June 2004). "Staff Lists: Top 100 Albums of the 1970s". Pitchfork. Retrieved 14 January 2013. 

External links[edit]