Hearts of Stone

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This article is about the R&B song. For other uses, see Hearts of Stone (disambiguation).

"Hearts of Stone" is an American R&B song. It was written by Eddie Ray and Rudy Jackson,[1] a member of the San Bernardino, California-based rhythm and blues vocal group the Jewels (no relation to the female Jewels group from Washington, DC) which first recorded it for the R&B label in 1954.[2] The Jewels began as a gospel group, then became the Marbles, recording for the Lucky label out of Los Angeles.

According to Johnny Torrence, leader of the Marbles/Jewels, it was taken from a song they recorded in their gospel days. "Hearts of Stone" was covered and taken to the charts by East Coast R&B vocal group the Charms, causing the story of the Jewels' involvement to be ignored by various writers and DJs who assume the Charms' cover was the original. The Charms' version of the song went to number one on the R&B Best Sellers and number fifteen on the pop charts.[3]

A different song, also with the name "Hearts of Stone", was written by Bruce Springsteen and recorded during the Darkness on the Edge of Town sessions (appears on the anthology box set Tracks). It was recorded and released by Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes on their 1978 album Hearts of Stone.

Other recordings[edit]

It also has been recorded by:

Anita, June, Helen and Mother Maybelle Carter performed a memorable live version of this song on an appearance filmed in color by Albert Gannaway in Nashville in the mid-1950s. Red Foley opened both the first and last programs of Ozark Jubilee with the song.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://repertoire.bmi.com/title.asp?blnWriter=True&blnPublisher=True&blnArtist=True&keyID=548485&ShowNbr=0&ShowSeqNbr=0&querytype=WorkID Hearts Of Stone, BMI Repertoire
  2. ^ Dave Marsh (1999). The Heart of Rock & Soul: The 1001 Greatest Singles Ever Made. Da Capo Press. p. 128. ISBN 0-306-80901-X. 
  3. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). Top R&B/Hip-Hop Singles: 1942-2004. Record Research. p. 114. 
Preceded by
"Mambo Baby" by Ruth Brown and Her Rhythmmakers
Billboard R&B Best Sellers in Stores number-one single
November 27, 1954 - January 8, 1955
Succeeded by
"Earth Angel (Will You Be Mine)" by The Penguins
Preceded by
"Let Me Go, Lover!" by Joan Weber
U.S. Billboard Best Sellers in Stores number-one single
February 5, 1955
Succeeded by
"Sincerely" by McGuire Sisters
Preceded by
"Let Me Go, Lover!" by Joan Weber
U.S. Billboard Most Played in Jukeboxes number-one single
February 12–26, 1955
Succeeded by
"Sincerely" by McGuire Sisters