Heathrow Hub railway station

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For Heathrow Hub, the Heathrow Airport expansion proposal, see Heathrow Hub.
Heathrow Hub
Location
Place Hillingdon, Greater London
Grid reference TQ047800
Operations
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Heathrow Hub railway station is a proposed railway interchange to serve, principally, future High Speed 2 rail services for Heathrow Airport, England. It was part of a proposal put forward by global engineering, design and consulting firm Arup in 2008, as a means of extending the UK’s high-speed rail network from central London to Heathrow Airport.

Proposal[edit]

In the late 1980s Arup researched an innovative alternative for the alignment of the Channel Tunnel Rail Link. The route proposed by the company focused on using the link as a catalyst for regeneration - it was adopted by Government in 1991. It came into being in November 2007, when the first Eurostar arrived via High Speed 1, at St Pancras railway station.

Arup’s proposal would create a high-speed rail station at the airport alongside a future airport terminal, providing it with a direct rail link to continental Europe via Eurostar International services. The new station would have also connect regional rail services on the Great Western Main Line to Heathrow, making the airport more accessible to the West, South West, Wales and the Midlands and provided a direct train service between the Thames Gateway and the Thames Valley.

The new rail link to Heathrow was to offer passengers the choice between different modes of transport. Currently, just 22% of passengers arrive at Heathrow by rail, including the London Underground, while 65% arrive by car.

Evaluations[edit]

The cost of the Heathrow Hub railway station project (including the costs of tunnelling a High-Speed Rail line from central London to Heathrow and a rail station with international and regional services) was estimated to be around £4.5 billion. In 2008, Arup met with former Secretary of State for Transport, Ruth Kelly to discuss how this cost could be private sector funded.

When published in February 2009, the Conservative Rail Review,[1] ‘Getting the best for passengers’, confirmed that "a Conservative Government would support proposals along the lines of the plan put forward by engineering firm, Arup, for a new Heathrow rail hub."

Debate sparked by the Heathrow Hub railway station proposal led to the Government’s 2009 decision to set up HS2 Ltd.[2] The organisation is charged with considering the options to extend the UK’s high-speed rail network from London to Birmingham and beyond.

In 2010 the incoming Coalition Government favoured a high-speed route via Heathrow Hub railway station, rather than an Old Oak Common interchange. In July 2010 plans emerged for a 12 platform station at Iver with services from High Speed 1, 2, Crossrail and the Great Western Main Line. It would be 3½ minutes from Heathrow Terminal 5 and 12 from Euston.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Conservative Rail Review". Retrieved 2013-07-12. 
  2. ^ Department for Transport and High Speed Two Limited. "Department for Transport: Britain's Transport Infrastructure: High Speed Two". Dft.gov.uk. Retrieved 2013-07-12. 
  3. ^ Massive train station-cum-airport terminal proposed at Iver. "Massive train station-cum-airport terminal proposed at Iver - Communities - Beaconsfield". Beaconsfield.buckinghamshireadvertiser.co.uk. Retrieved 2013-07-12. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 51°31′N 0°29′W / 51.51°N 0.49°W / 51.51; -0.49