Heinz London

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Heinz London
Born (1907-11-07)7 November 1907
Died 3 August 1970(1970-08-03) (aged 62) [1]
Institutions University of Bristol
University of Oxford
Clarendon Laboratory
Known for London equations[2]
Notable awards Fellow of the Royal Society (1961)[1]

Heinz London (Bonn, Germany 1907-1970) was a German Physicist.

Education[edit]

After studying in different German universities, London fled to England in 1933 along with his brother Fritz London due to the Nazi racial laws.

Career[edit]

London worked with his brother Fritz London on superconductivity, discovering the London equations[2] when working at the University of Oxford, in the Clarendon Laboratory.[3]

These equations gave a first explanation to the Meissner effect (and, so, to the properties of superconductors). He is known as well for being the inventor of the dilution refrigerator, a cryogenic device that uses liquid helium.

Honours and awards[edit]

London was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1961, [1] his nomination read


References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Shoenberg, D. (1971). "Heinz London 1907-1970". Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society 17: 441. doi:10.1098/rsbm.1971.0017.  edit
  2. ^ a b London, F.; London, H. (1935). "The Electromagnetic Equations of the Supraconductor". Proceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences 149 (866): 71. Bibcode:1935RSPSA.149...71L. doi:10.1098/rspa.1935.0048.  edit
  3. ^ Appleyard, E. T. S., J. R. Bristow, and H. London (1939). "Variation of Field Penetration with Temperature in a Superconductor". Nature 143: 433–434. doi:10.1038/143433a0. 
  4. ^ "Royal Society Library Archive Details for London, Heinz". London: The Royal Society. Retrieved 2013-11-29.