Helga Haase

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Helga Haase
Bundesarchiv Bild 183-F0104-0049-001, Helga Haase.jpg
Helga Haase in action during the 1967 East German Championships
Personal information
Full name Helga Haase-Obschernitzki
Born (1934-06-09)June 9, 1934
Danzig, Free City of Danzig (now Gdańsk, Poland)
Died June 16, 1989(1989-06-16) (aged 55)
East Berlin, East Germany

Helga Haase (née Obschernitzki, June 9, 1934 – June 16, 1989) was a speedskater in East Germany. She was born in Danzig and died in East Berlin.

Career[edit]

Helga's career began 1952, when she introduced herself at 18 years at the SC Dynamo Berlin, which looked for high-speed ice skaters to the world and married thereupon her coach Helmut Haase.

From 1957 to 1967, Haase (hare) reached 15 GDR master skating titles on separate distances ('Einzelstrecken'), an additional seven titles in combination results (Samalog or 'Mehrkampf' in German) and a further four on a very small indoor rink ('Kleinbahn'), a fore runner of present indoor short track skating.

1960: the Olympic Winter Games[edit]

In preparation of the Olympic Wintergames of 1960 she went to Davos with the ladies of the unified German team and broke the multi-combination world record in Davos, Switzerland)[1] With the 1960 Winter Olympics in Squaw Valley,[2] she won, as first German speedskater and as a first sportswoman of the GDR, a gold medal at the Olympic Winter Games, the gold medal over 500 m. That medal also was the first olympic medal for any woman in women's speed skating, as it was not before on the Olympic program. She also won the silver medal over 1000 m and finished at a respectable 8th place over 1500 m., and all of this despite the prohibition of the entry for her husband/coach.

1964: the Olympic Winter Games[edit]

In the Olympic season of 1964, she reached again peak performance, resulting in a fourth place over 1000 m and a fifth place over 1500 m with the Olympic Games in Innsbruck. In the course of her career Helga Haase skated 23 German records.[3]

Post-career[edit]

In 1978, her grandson Robert Haase was born. Starting from 1984 she went into a pension because of disablement .[4] She worked also in the central guidance of the Sportvereinigung Dynamo.

Gallery[edit]

Records[edit]

World records
Distance Result Location Date
mini combination 202.834 Davos 20 January 1960
East-German records
Distance Result Location Date
1,000 m 1:42.5 Zakopane 9 March 1958
500 m 49.5 Medeo 25 January 1959
1500 m 2:39.1 Medeo 25 January 1959
1000 m 1:41.5 Medeo 26 January 1959
mini combination 210.116 Medeo 26 January 1959
500 m 47.3 Medeo 31 January 1959
1000 m 1:37.7 Medeo 2 February 1959
1500 m 2:37.1 Jekatrinburg 28 February 1959
500 m 47.0 Davos 8 January 1960
1000 m 1:37.4 Davos 14 January 1960
1500 m 2:33.8 Davos 19 January 1960
3000 m 5:31.0 Davos 20 January 1960
mini combination 202.834 Davos 20 January 1960
500 m 46.8 Davos 30 January 1960
1500 m 2:33.4 Davos 30 January 1960
1000 m 1:35.4 Davos 31 January 1960
3000 m 5:29.3 Davos 31 January 1960
mini combination 200.516 Davos 31 January 1960
500 m 45.9 Squaw Valley 20 February 1960
1500 m 2:31.7 Squaw Valley 21 February 1960
1000 m 1:34.3 Squaw Valley 22 February 1960
1500 m 2:28.6 Innsbruck 31 January 1960
3,000 m 5:19.7 Berlin 1 March 1964
[5]
Personal records
Distance Result Location Date
500 m 45.9 Squaw Valley 20 February 1960
1,000 m 1:34.3 Squaw Valley 22 February 1960
1,500 m 2:28.6 Innsbruck 31 January 1964
3,000 m 5:19.7 Berlin 1 March 1964
mini combination 200.516 Davos 30/31 January 1960

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Eng, Trond. All Time International Championships, Complete Results 1889 - 2002. Askim, Norway: WSSSA Skøytenytt, 2002.
  • Teigen, Magne. Komplette resultater, Internasjonale Mesterskap 1889-1989 (in Norwegian). Veggli, Norway: WSSSA Skøytenytt, 1989.
  • Zickow, Alfred. 100 Jahre Deutsche Eisschnellaufmeisterschaften, 1891-1991. Ein Beitrag zur Geschichte des Eisschnellaufes (in German). Berlin, Germany: DESG, 1991.