Helge Krog

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Helge Krog in 1919.

Helge Krog (9 February 1889 – 30 July 1962) was a Norwegian journalist, essayist, theatre and literary critic, translator and playwright.

Personal life[edit]

Krog was born in Kristiania, the son of jurist Fredrik Arentz Krog and Ida Cecilie Thoresen.[1] His mother was the first female student in Norway, in 1882, and a well-known feminist.[2] He was married to writer and publicist Eli Meyer from 1912 to 1947, and to actress Tordis Maurstad from 1949.[1]

Career[edit]

Krog graduated as cand.oecon. in 1911. He worked for the newspaper Verdens Gang from 1912, and from 1914 as a theatre and literary critic. He later worked for the newspapers Tidens Tegn, Arbeiderbladet and Dagbladet.[1] He issued the article collection Meninger om bøker og forfattere in 1929 (lit. Opininons on books and writers), and a second collection, Meninger om mange ting in 1933.[3]

His first play was the press comedy Det store Vi from 1917,[1] which was staged at several Scandinavian theatres.[3] The play was a great success at Nationaltheatret with almost sixty performances, Gerda Ring playing the "shop girl" character, and August Oddvar the "young journalist".[4] The play På solsiden from 1927 was later basis for a film (in 1956).[3] Other plays were Konkylien from 1929, and Don Juan (together with Sigurd Hoel, from 1930).[1] The plays Underveis (1931) and Opbrudd (1936) are treating the women's role in society, and were also of interest during the feminist movement of the 1970s.[1]

During the inter-war period Krog became known as a member of the "radical triumvirate", along with Arnulf Øverland and Sigurd Hoel.[1]

World War II[edit]

During the last part of World War II Krog lived in exile in Sweden, where he contributed to the magazine Håndslag.[5] He published, under pseudonym, the critical article "Nazi-Tysklands krigspotensial og den 6-te kolonne i Norge" in 1944,[6][7] an article which was subject to much debate, also after the war.[8] The pamphlet was reissued in an expanded version in 1946, questioning the contributions from the Norwegian large-scale industry to the warfare of Nazi Germany (Norwegian: 6. kolonne -? Om den norske storindustriens bidrag til Nazi-Tysklands krigføring).[1]

He died in Oslo.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Rottem, Øystein. "Helge Krog". In Helle, Knut. Norsk biografisk leksikon (in Norwegian). Oslo: Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 28 December 2009. 
  2. ^ "Cecilie Thoresen Krog". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Oslo: Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 28 December 2009. 
  3. ^ a b c "Helge Krog". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Oslo: Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 28 December 2009. 
  4. ^ Rønneberg, Anton (1949). Nationaltheatret gjennom femti år (in Norwegian). Oslo: Gyldendal. p. 60. 
  5. ^ Luihn, Hans (1960). De illegale avisene (in Norwegian). Oslo / Bergen: Universitetsforlaget. pp. 178–179. 
  6. ^ Ringdal, Nils Johan (1995). "Krog, Helge". In Dahl, Hjeltnes, Nøkleby, Ringdal, Sørensen. Norsk krigsleksikon 1940-45 (in Norwegian). Oslo: Cappelen. p. 235. ISBN 82-02-14138-9. Retrieved 28 December 2009. 
  7. ^ Ringdal, Nils Johan (1995). "6-te kolonne". In Dahl, Hjeltnes, Nøkleby, Ringdal, Sørensen. Norsk krigsleksikon 1940-45 (in Norwegian). Oslo: Cappelen. p. 380. ISBN 82-02-14138-9. Retrieved 28 December 2009. 
  8. ^ Kraglund, Ivar; Moland, Arnfinn (1987). "Helge Krogs 6te kolonne: Norsk industri under krigen". In Skodvin, Magne. Norge i Krig. Hjemmefront (in Norwegian) 6. Oslo: Aschehoug. p. 224. ISBN 82-03-11421-0.