Helsinki Finland Temple

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Helsinki Finland Temple
Helsinki Finland Temple-cropped.JPG
Number 124 edit data
Dedication 22 October 2006 (22 October 2006) by
Gordon B. Hinckley
Site 7.4 acres (3 hectares)
Floor area 23,000 sq ft (2,100 m2)
Height 139 ft (42 m)
Preceded by Sacramento California Temple
Followed by Rexburg Idaho Temple
Official websiteNews & images

Coordinates: 60°13′30.69479″N 24°46′54.42599″E / 60.2251929972°N 24.7817849972°E / 60.2251929972; 24.7817849972

Helsinki LDS Temple August 2012.jpg

The Helsinki Finland Temple is the 124th operating temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). Unlike LDS chapels, where worship services are held and visitors are welcome, the temple is open only to church members.

Located at Leppäsillantie 3 in Espoo, the Helsinki Finland Temple has a total of 19,500 square feet (1,810 m2), two ordinance rooms, and four sealing rooms. It once served the geographically largest temple district of the church, which included Finland, the Baltic states, and all of Russia.[1] It was the final temple dedicated during the presidency of Gordon B. Hinckley and the last dedicated by Hinckley.

History[edit]

The church's First Presidency announced on April 2, 2000 that a temple would be built near Helsinki in Espoo, Finland.

On March 29, 2003 a site dedication and groundbreaking ceremony were held in Karakallio, a district of Espoo. D. Lee Tobler, of the church's Second Quorum of the Seventy, presided at the ceremony and gave the site dedication prayer.

An open house was held September 21 to October 7, 2006 to allow the public to tour the temple prior to its dedication.[1] The temple was dedicated on October 22, 2006 by Gordon B. Hinckley, after a cultural celebration was held the evening before.[2]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Satterfield, Rick, Helsinki Finland Temple, LDSChurchTemples.com, retrieved 2012-10-16 
  2. ^ Stahle, Shaun D. (October 28, 2006), "Temple dedicated in Helsinki, Finland", Church News, retrieved 2012-10-16 

References[edit]

External links[edit]