Henrietta Adler

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Henrietta Adler
Nettie Adler.jpg
Nettie Adler circa 1922
Born 1 December 1868 (1868-12)
London
Died 15 April 1950 (1950-04-16) (aged 81)
London
Other names Nettie Adler
Occupation British politician

Henrietta Adler (1 December 1868 – 15 April 1950), known as Nettie Adler, was a Jewish Liberal Party politician who was one of the first women to be elected and to be able to take her seat on the London County Council.

Background[edit]

She was the daughter of Chief Rabbi, Dr H. Adler. She was educated at private school and classes.[1]

Career[edit]

She began social work as a school manager under the London School Board. She was Honorary Secretary of the Committee on Wage Earning Children, 1899–1946. She was a Member of Council of the Anglo-Jewish Association.[1]

Political career[edit]

She was a Liberal Party member and therefore in local government politics was aligned with the Progressive Party. She was first politically active in her home area of Hackney. Her main political interest was in education. She was a Member of the Governing Bodies of the Dalston County School, of the Hackney Downs School and the Hackney Technical Institute. Due to her interest in educational matters she was co-opted onto the London Education Committee by the Progressive majority in 1905, serving as a co-optee on that body until she was elected to it following the 1910 London County Council elections. When the Liberal Government first created the London County Council there was nothing to stipulate that women could not stand as candidates for election and two Progressive women candidates duly stood and were elected. However, there was a legal challenge made by one of the defeated conservative candidates and as a result, neither of the women were able to take their seats. When the Liberal Party returned to power in 1905 they set about changing the law so that women could be elected to the LCC and this change came into effect for the 1910 elections and Adler was one of two women who were elected. She was elected as a Councillor to the London County Council as one of the representatives for the constituency of Hackney Central in 1910;

Hackney Central in the London County area, 1885–1918
London County Council election, 1910: Hackney Central[2]

Electorate

Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Green tickY Alfred James Shepheard 3,684 27.5
Progressive Green tickY Henrietta Adler 3,521 26.2
Municipal Reform G J Dowse 3,157 23.5
Municipal Reform John Foster Vesey-FitzGerald 3,053 22.8
Majority 527 4.0
Progressive gain from Municipal Reform Swing
Majority 364 2.7
Progressive gain from Municipal Reform Swing

In March 1913 she was re-elected, although her running mate lost to the Unionist backed Municipal Reform Party;

London County Council election, 1913: Hackney Central[2]

Electorate 11,543

Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Municipal Reform Green tickY William Ray 3,670 25.2
Progressive Green tickY Henrietta Adler 3,653 25.0 -1.2
Municipal Reform Lord William Cecil 3,645 25.0
Progressive Alfred James Shepheard 3,622 24.8
Majority 8
Progressive hold Swing n/a
Majority 48
Municipal Reform gain from Progressive Swing

In March 1919, following the end of the war, the boundaries for her constituency were slightly altered and she was returned unopposed due to an electoral understanding of both the Progressive and Municipal Reform parties to only adopt one candidate each;

Hackney Central in the London County area 1918-49
London County Council election, 1919: Hackney Central[3]

Electorate 21,732

Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Green tickY Henrietta Adler Unopposed n/a n/a
Municipal Reform Green tickY William Ray Unopposed n/a n/a
Progressive hold Swing n/a
Municipal Reform hold Swing n/a

In March 1922 the uneasy electoral arrangement between the Progressive and Municipal Reform parties continued;

London County Council election, 1922: Hackney Central[3]

Electorate 29,557

Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Green tickY Henrietta Adler Unopposed n/a n/a
Municipal Reform Green tickY William Ray Unopposed n/a n/a
Progressive hold Swing n/a
Municipal Reform hold Swing n/a

From 1922 to 1923 she served as Deputy Chairman of the London County Council. She was defeated in 1925;

London County Council election, 1925: Hackney Central[4]

Electorate 31,914

Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Municipal Reform Green tickY William Ray 4,878
Municipal Reform Green tickY Humphrey H Edmonds* 4,595
Labour P H Black 3,299 n/a
Labour John Hunter Harley 3,183 n/a
Progressive Henrietta Adler 2,759
Progressive A Mortimer 2,436
Municipal Reform gain from Progressive Swing n/a
Municipal Reform hold Swing n/a

She was a Member of the Departmental Committee on Charity Collections, 1925–27. Following the demise of the Progressive Party she was re-elected to the LCC in 1928 standing as a Liberal Party candidate;

London County Council election, 1928: Hackney Central[5]

Electorate

Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Municipal Reform Green tickY William Ray 5,092
Liberal Green tickY Henrietta Adler 5,008
Municipal Reform Lord Cranbrook 4,960
Liberal G J Lusher-Pentney 4,820
Labour Amy Sayle 2,743
Labour H W Butler 2,737
Independent Labour S L Alexander 625 n/a
Independent Labour J W Head 593 n/a
Liberal gain from Municipal Reform Swing
Municipal Reform hold Swing

She was finally defeated in 1931.

London County Council election, 1931: Hackney Central[6]

Electorate

Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Municipal Reform Green tickY Sir William Ray 5,468
Municipal Reform Green tickY Montague Moustardier 5,224
Labour Dr Bernard Homa 3,715
Labour Dr Mary O'Brien-Harris 3,672
Liberal Henrietta Adler 2,774
Liberal H Baily 2,324
Municipal Reform gain from Liberal Swing
Municipal Reform hold Swing

Despite her election defeat in 1931, she was co-opted onto the London County Council Public Health Committee for a three year term. [1]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Who's Who". ukWhosWho.com. Retrieved 2014-01-25. 
  2. ^ a b London Municipal Notes, 1913
  3. ^ a b London Municipal Notes - Volumes 18-23, London Municipal Society
  4. ^ The Times 6 Mar 1925 p16
  5. ^ The Times 9 Mar 1928 p11
  6. ^ The Times 6 Mar 1931 p16