Sentoryū Henri

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戦闘竜 扁利
Sentoryū Henri
Personal information
Born Henry Armstrong Miller
(1969-07-16) July 16, 1969 (age 44)
Tokyo, Japan
Height 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)
Weight 136 kg (300 lb)
Web presence website
Career
Stable Tomozuna
Record 403-303-99
Debut July 1988
Highest rank Maegashira 12 (September, 2000)
Retired November, 2003
Championships 1 (Makushita)
1 (Jonokuchi)
* Up to date as of November 2007.
Henry "Sentoryū" Miller
Born Henry Armstrong Miller
(1969-07-16) July 16, 1969 (age 44)
Tokyo, Japan
Other names Sentoryū
Nationality American
Japanese
Height 5 ft 9 in (175 cm)
Weight 300 lb (136 kg; 21 st 6 lb)
Division Super Heavyweight
Style Kickboxing
Stance Orthodox
Fighting out of Tokyo, Japan
Team Team Fighting Dragon
Rank Maegashira in Sumo
Years active 7 (2004-present)
Kickboxing record
Total 3
Wins 1
By knockout 1
Losses 2
By knockout 2
Draws 0
Mixed martial arts record
Total 23
Wins 6
By knockout 5
By submission 1
Losses 16
By knockout 13
By submission 2
By decision 1
Draws 0
No contests 1
Other information
Mixed martial arts record from Sherdog

Henry Armstrong Miller (born July 16, 1969) is a former sumo wrestler, raised in St. Louis, Missouri, United States, who competed under the shikona Sentoryū Henri (戦闘竜 扁利?). The first wrestler from the US mainland to reach the top makuuchi division, he made his professional debut in 1988 and reached a highest rank of maegashira 12 before retiring in 2003. He is currently a mixed martial artist.

Early life[edit]

He was born in Tachikawa, Japan, the son of an Amnerican father and Japanese mother. He lived on Yokota Air Base until the age of six, when he moved with his family to St Louis, Missouri. He grew up in Ferguson. His dream of becoming a professional football player was ended by a knee injury in his senior year of high school, but he had also been wrestling since elementary school and he had qualified for the state championships. After graduating in 1987 he returned to Japan to try professional sumo.

Sumo career[edit]

He joined the Tomozuna stable of wrestlers, also the home of future ozeki Kaio. He was given the shikona of Sentoryū, meaning "fighting war dragon" but also a play on words, namechecking his home town of St Louis.[1] He was relatively small at 174 cm and 94 kg when he made his debut in July 1988. He won the yusho or tournament championship in his first official tournament in the jonidan division in September 1988, defeating a fellow American, Shinnishiki from Los Angeles.[1] In 1991 he reached makushita for the first time but injury problems meant he did not establish himself in the division until 1993. In November 1994 he became a sekitori for the first time but lasted only two tournaments in the jūryō division before being demoted.

It took Sentoryū more than four years of hard toil in the unsalaried makushita division (including a change of name to Kaishinzan in 1997) before he could win promotion back to the second division in July 1999, after an unbeaten 7-0 yusho in May. His final day victory over the former amateur champion Kototamiya (the future ozeki Kotomitsuki) was regarded as one of the high points of his career.[2]

After reverting to the name Sentoryū, a strong 13-2 record in March 2000 sent him to the top of the jūryō division. With an 8-7 mark in May 2000, he finally achieved his goal of promotion to the top makuuchi division in July.[3] It had taken him 72 tournaments from his professional debut to reach makuuchi, by far the slowest amongst foreign born wrestlers.

Sentoryū came through with a winning record of 8-7 in his debut but was then demoted after only recording a 5-10 score in September 2000. He had to withdraw from the following tournament in November and missed the January 2001 basho. Nevertheless he managed to hold his own in jūryō, and had one more visit to the top division in January 2002. However, he suffered a serious injury and was unable to compete in the March and May 2002 tournaments, falling all the way back to makushita. He refused to give up and fought his way back to sekitori status in September 2003, becoming the fifth oldest wrestler to return to jūryō in the postwar era at 34 years, 1 month. However, another injury convinced him to retire at the end of the year, in the same tournament as Musashimaru. His great fighting spirit, despite all his injuries, won him many admirers.[4]

He defeated Asashōryū in their only meeting in November 2000, when both were in the jūryō division. He also had three wins over Kotomitsuki in their four meetings.

Fighting style[edit]

Sentoryū favoured pushing and thrusting techniques, winning most of his matches by oshi dashi (push out), hatakikomi (slap down) or hikiotoshi (pull down).

Mixed martial arts career[edit]

Since his retirement from sumo, Sentoryū has tried his luck at mixed martial arts.[5] His debut was for PRIDE in April 2004. He has six wins and nine losses in his sixteen fights to date.[6] He styles himself Henry "Sentoryu" Miller. He made an agreement with World Victory Road and recently fought against Yoshihiro Nakao. On 25 December 2010 he faced Yoichi Babaguchi (former sekiwake Wakashoyo) in the first ever K1 fight between former sekitori.[2] There was an edge to the match because Miller blamed Babaguchi for an injury he sustained in a sumo bout between the two in November 1994 (his debut juryo tournament).[2] Miller won the match in the first round.[7]

Sumo career record[edit]

Sentoryū Henri[8]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
1988 x x x (Maezumo) East Jonokuchi #51
6–1–PPP
 
West Jonidan #119
4–3
 
1989 West Jonidan #89
4–3
 
West Jonidan #59
5–2
 
East Jonidan #22
2–5
 
East Jonidan #56
0–0–7
 
West Jonidan #126
6–1
 
East Jonidan #52
3–1–3
 
1990 West Jonidan #72
5–2
 
East Jonidan #25
6–1
 
West Sandanme #66
6–1
 
East Sandanme #18
0–0–7
 
East Sandanme #78
5–2
 
East Sandanme #44
6–1
 
1991 East Makushita #60
1–2–4
 
West Sandanme #35
0–0–7
 
West Sandanme #35
6–1
 
East Makushita #55
3–3–1
 
East Sandanme #6
0–0–7
 
East Sandanme #6
2–5
 
1992 West Sandanme #34
2–5
 
West Sandanme #61
5–2
 
West Sandanme #30
4–3
 
West Sandanme #18
3–4
 
East Sandanme #33
3–4
 
East Sandanme #51
6–1
 
1993 East Sandanme #5
6–1
 
West Makushita #34
4–3
 
West Makushita #23
4–3
 
West Makushita #16
4–3
 
East Makushita #12
0–0–7
 
East Makushita #12
5–2
 
1994 West Makushita #7
2–5
 
East Makushita #22
6–1
 
East Makushita #9
5–2
 
West Makushita #4
5–2
 
East Makushita #2
6–1
 
East Jūryō #12
9–6
 
1995 East Jūryō #9
6–9
 
East Makushita #1
3–4
 
West Makushita #5
4–3
 
East Makushita #3
4–3
 
West Makushita #2
0–2–5
 
East Makushita #37
0–0–7
 
1996 East Makushita #37
5–2
 
East Makushita #21
2–5
 
West Makushita #40
4–3
 
East Makushita #31
6–1–P
 
East Makushita #13
5–2
 
East Makushita #5
3–4
 
1997 East Makushita #8
6–1
 
East Makushita #2
2–5
 
East Makushita #14
2–5
 
West Makushita #29
6–1
 
West Makushita #12
4–3
 
East Makushita #10
6–1
 
1998 East Makushita #2
2–5
 
West Makushita #13
1–6
 
West Makushita #36
6–1
 
East Makushita #16
4–3
 
West Makushita #12
4–3
 
East Makushita #8
3–4
 
1999 East Makushita #14
4–3
 
West Makushita #11
4–3
 
East Makushita #9
7–0
 
West Jūryō #11
8–7
 
West Jūryō #10
6–9
 
West Jūryō #13
9–6
 
2000 West Jūryō #9
7–8
 
East Jūryō #11
13–2–P
 
East Jūryō #2
8–7
 
East Maegashira #13
8–7
 
West Maegashira #12
5–10
 
East Jūryō #1
3–5–7
 
2001 West Jūryō #9
0–0–15
 
West Jūryō #9
9–6
 
West Jūryō #4
7–8
 
East Jūryō #6
9–6–PP
 
West Jūryō #2
7–8
 
West Jūryō #3
8–7
 
2002 East Maegashira #15
6–9
 
East Jūryō #3
0–0–15
 
East Makushita #1
0–0–7
 
East Makushita #41
5–2
 
East Makushita #26
2–5
 
West Makushita #44
6–1
 
2003 West Makushita #18
5–2
 
East Makushita #9
4–3
 
West Makushita #6
4–3
 
West Makushita #3
5–2
 
West Jūryō #11
4–11
 
West Makushita #5
Retired
2–5–0
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

Kickboxing record[edit]

Kickboxing record

Legend:       Win       Loss       Draw/No contest

Mixed martial arts record[edit]

Res. Record Opponent Method Event Date Round Time Location Notes
Loss 6-16 (1) Japan Kazuhiro Nakamura KO (punch)[9] DEEP: 63 Impact August 25, 2013 1 4:42 Tokyo, Japan
Loss 6-15 (1) Australia Soa Palelei TKO (punches) K-Oz Entertainment: Bragging Rights September 3, 2012 1 1:26 Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Loss 6-14 (1) Japan Shunsuke Inoue TKO (punches) HEAT 20 December 17, 2011 1 1:43 Tokyo, Japan
Loss 6-13 (1) United States Myles Tynanes TKO (punches) HEAT 19 September 25, 2011 1 3:29 Nagoya, Japan
Loss 6-12 (1) Japan Takaaki Oban Submission (rear-naked choke) Gladiator 23 September 3, 2011 1 1:40 Hiroshima, Japan
Loss 6-11 (1) Japan Taiei Kin TKO (corner stoppage) HEAT 16 November 6, 2010 1 4:01 Osaka, Japan
Loss 6-10 (1) Japan Yoshihiro Nakao TKO (punches) Sengoku Raiden Championships 12 March 7, 2010 2 3:27 Tokyo, Japan
Win 6-9 (1) South Korea Kim Min-Soo KO (punches and knees) The Khan 2 November 27, 2009 1 1:12 Seoul, South Korea
Loss 5-9 (1) South Korea Lee Chang-Seob TKO (punches) HEAT 12 November 1, 2009 1 0:53 Nagoya, Japan
Loss 5-8 (1) Brazil Cristiano Kaminishi TKO (punches) HEAT 11 September 26, 2009 3 3:36 Tokyo, Japan
NC 5-7 (1) Brazil Cristiano Kaminishi No contest (groin strike) HEAT 10 July 18, 2009 1 0:54 Tokyo, Japan
Win 5-7 Japan Ryuta Noji KO (punches) HEAT 9 March 28, 2009 1 1:14 Nagoya, Japan
Win 4-7 Japan Junpei Hamada KO (punches) HEAT 8 December 14, 2008 1 0:52 Tokyo, Japan
Loss 3-7 Brazil Cristiano Kaminishi KO (head kick) DEEP: 29 Impact April 13, 2007 1 4:00 Tokyo, Japan
Win 3-6 South Korea Kim Ji-Fun KO (punch) HEAT 3 March 23, 2007 1 4:58 Nagoya, Japan
Loss 2-6 Lebanon Mostapha al-Turk TKO (punches) Cage Rage 18 August 27, 2006 1 0:56 London, England
Win 2-5 Japan Seiji Ogura Submission (rear-naked choke) Pancrase August 27, 2006 1 1:37 Yokohama, Japan
Loss 1-5 England Robert Berry TKO (punches) Cage Rage 17 July 1, 2006 1 1:06 London, England
Loss 1-4 Brazil Zuluzinho TKO (knees) Pride 30 October 23, 2005 1 1:31 Saitama, Saitama, Japan
Loss 1-3 England James Thompson KO (punch) Pride Bushido 8 July 17, 2005 1 1:21 Nagoya, Japan
Loss 1-2 Japan Makoto Takimoto Decision (unanimous) Pride Shockwave 2004 December 31, 2004 1 0:21 Saitama, Saitama, Japan
Win 1-1 Australia Mal Foki KO (punches) Pride Bushido 5 October 14, 2004 1 0:21 Osaka, Japan
Loss 0-1 Brazil Giant Silva Submission (kimura) Pride Total Elimination 2004 April 25, 2004 1 4:04 Saitama, Saitama, Japan 2004 Heavyweight Grand Prix opening round

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Sharnoff, Lora (1993). Grand Sumo. Weatherhill. p. 170. 
  2. ^ a b c Gunning, John (24 December 2010). "Saint no more: Miller seeks revenge on Christmas". Daily Yomiuri Online. Archived from the original on 28 December 2010. 
  3. ^ "Akebono wins despite last day upset". BBC News Online. 2000-07-23. Retrieved 2007-06-25. 
  4. ^ Pourquie, Bastian (December 2003). "Rikishi that have retired". Le Monde du Sumo. Retrieved 2007-06-25. 
  5. ^ "Henry "Sentoryu" Miller". Pride Fighting Championships. Retrieved 2007-06-25. 
  6. ^ "Sherdog Fightfinder: Henry "Sentoryu" Miller". Sherdog. Retrieved 2007-06-25. 
  7. ^ "Sentoryu has his revenge". Daily Yomiuri Online. 27 December 2010. Retrieved 29 December 2010. 
  8. ^ "Sentoryu Henri Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 18 October 2012. 
  9. ^ http://www.tapology.com/fightcenter/bouts/deep-kazuhiro-kaz-nakamura-vs-henry-sentoryu-miller

External links[edit]