Henry Bertram Price

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Henry Bertrand Price
30th Naval Governor of Guam
In office
August 4, 1923 – August 26, 1924
Preceded by Adelbert Althouse
Succeeded by A.W. Brown
Personal details
Born (1869-06-20)June 20, 1869
Burlington, Iowa
Died September 23, 1941(1941-09-23) (aged 72)
San Francisco, California
Nationality  United States
Alma mater United States Naval Academy
Military service
Allegiance  United States
Service/branch United States Navy Seal United States Navy
Rank US-O6 insignia.svg Captain
Commands USS Melville

Henry Bertrand Price[1] (June 29, 1869 – September 23, 1941) was a United States Navy Captain who served as the 30th Naval Governor of Guam. As a naval officer, he served on many assignments, including with the Bureau of Ordnance. In 1913, he became executive officer of the USS Delaware, and two years later commanding officer of the USS Melville. Becoming governor in 1923, Price focused on agricultural development, particularly in the region of Mangilao, Guam. He also ordered increased road building and the establishment of the Guam Department of Agriculture.

Life and legacy[edit]

He married Katherine French Banks in Honolulu; she died in 1901.[2] The Captain Henry B. Price Elementary School is named in his honor.[3] The school was opened in 1958 and serves grades kindergarten through five; it was named because of Price's push for agricultural development in the area in the 1920s.[4]

Naval career[edit]

Upon graduating from the United States Naval Academy in 1895, Price became an assistant engineer and an ensign.[5] He became a lieutenant in 1901.[6] With this rank, he served aboard both the USS Don Juan de Austria and the USS Princeton.[7] In 1907, he served in the Bureau of Ordnance.[8] In 1913, he became executive officer aboard the USS Delaware.[9] In December 1915, he set sail as the first commanding officer of the USS Melville.[10] He was promoted to the rank of Captain in 1917.[11]

Governorship[edit]

Price served as Governor of Guam from August 4, 1923 to August 26, 1924.[12] During his term, he encouraged an increase in self-sufficient farming. He also developed the area of Mangilao, Guam by building a road to the village and ordering the establishment of the Guam Department of Agriculture and a dairy factory there.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ "Local Brevities". The Hawaiian Gazette. Chronicling America. 15 March 1901. p. 4. Archived from the original on 21 March 2011. Retrieved 21 March 2011. 
  3. ^ "Management and Curriculum Audit for the Guam Public School System: Final Report". Evergreen Solutions. Hagåtña, Guam: Guam Public School System. 13 April 2009. pp. 2–43. Retrieved 21 March 2011. 
  4. ^ a b Guerrero, Victoria-Lola Leon (4 August 2010). "Mangilao". Guampedia. Guam: University of Guam. Archived from the original on 22 March 2011. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  5. ^ "Six-Year Cadets Assigned to Duty". The New York Times (New York City). The New York Times Company. 2 July 1895. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  6. ^ "Appointments in the Navy". New York Tribune. Chronicling America. 26 July 1901. p. 10. Archived from the original on 21 March 2011. Retrieved 21 March 2011. 
  7. ^ "The United Service". The New York Times (New York City). The New York Times Company. 7 June 1901. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  8. ^ "The Navy of the United States". The Chicago Daily News Almanac and Year Book (Chicago: Chicago Daily News) 24: 221. 1907. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  9. ^ Officers of the Navy and Marine Corps of the United States 3. Millington, Tennessee: Bureau of Naval Personnel. 1913. p. 46. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  10. ^ Mooney, James (1981). "Melville". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Washington, D.C.: Naval History & Heritage Command. Archived from the original on 22 March 2011. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  11. ^ "21 to Be Temporary Rear Admirals, 51 Captains, and 125 Commanders by Approval of President Wilson". Official U. S. Bulletin (Washington, D.C.: United States Committee on Public Relations) 1. 1917. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  12. ^ "Naval Era Governors of Guam". Guampedia. Guam: University of Guam. 10 August 2010. Archived from the original on 29 October 2010. Retrieved 21 March 2011.