Henry Bruen (1789–1852)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other people named Henry Bruen, see Henry Bruen (disambiguation).

Colonel Henry Bruen (3 October 1789 – 5 November 1852)[1] was an Irish Tory Party (and later Conservative Party) politician. He was Member of Parliament (MP) for Carlow County for a total of about 36 years, in three separate periods between 1812 and 1852, taking his seat in the House of Commons of what was then the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

Bruen was elected at the 1812 general election as MP for Carlow county,[2] and was then returned unopposed at the next three general elections. He won a contested election in 1830, but did not stand at the 1831 general election.[2] He stood again in 1832, but did not win either of Carlow's two seats.[3] He regained a seat at the general election in January 1835,[4] but the 1835 election in Carlow was overturned on petition, and Bruen lost his seat in the resulting by-election in 15 June.[5] However, the by-election was itself the subject of a petition, and the result was overturned, with Bruen being returned to Westminster, along with his father-in-law, fellow Conservative Thomas Kavanagh.[5]

He did not win a seat in 1837,[3] but returned to the House of Commons in 1840, when he won a by-election on 5 December after the death of the Liberal MP Nicholas Aylward Vigors.[6] He was then re-elected at the next three general elections,[3] and died in office in November 1852 at the age of 63, five months after holding his seat at the general election in July.

Family[edit]

Henry was the second son of Henry Bruen (1741–1795), and Dorothea Henrietta Knox.[7] His father originally came from Boyle, County Roscommon, but had moved in 1775 to Oak Park estate, near Carlow town. The estate was inherited by Henry, and remained in the family until 1957.[8]

In 1822 he married Anne Wandesforde Kavanagh, daughter of Thomas Kavanagh, The MacMorrough and Lady Elizabeth Butler.[9] (Anne's younger half-brother was Arthur MacMorrough Kavanagh (1831–1889), the severely disabled writer, politician and sportsman).[10] They had three daughters and one son, Henry (1828–1912), who was MP for Carlow County from 1857 to 1880.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Historical list of MPs: House of Commons constituencies beginning with "C", part 2". Leigh Rayment's House of Commons pages. Retrieved 9 December 2009. 
  2. ^ a b Brian M. Walker, ed. (1978). Parliamentary election results in Ireland 1801–1922. Dublin: Royal Irish Academy. p. 200. ISBN 0-901714-12-7. 
  3. ^ a b c Walker, op., cit., page 256
  4. ^ Walker, op., cit., page 56
  5. ^ a b Walker, op., cit., page 61
  6. ^ Walker, op., cit., page 68
  7. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "Colonel Henry Bruen (1)". ThePeerage.com. Retrieved 10 December 2009. [unreliable source]
  8. ^ "Oak Park Forest Park". Carlow County Museum. Retrieved 10 December 2009. 
  9. ^ a b Lundy, Darryl. "Colonel Henry Bruen, died 1852". ThePeerage.com. Retrieved 10 December 2009. [unreliable source]
  10. ^ Lundy, Darryl; ThePeerage.com. "Thomas Kavanagh, The MacMorrough". Retrieved 10 December 2009. [unreliable source]

External links[edit]

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
David Latouche
Walter Bagenal
Member of Parliament for Carlow County
18121831
With: David Latouche to 1816
Robert Anthony Latouche 1816–1818
Sir Ulysses Bagenal Burgh 1818–1826
Thomas Kavanagh 1826–1831
Succeeded by
Walter Blackney
Sir John Milley Doyle
Preceded by
Walter Blackney
Thomas Wallace
Member of Parliament for Carlow County
January 1835 – June 1835
With: Thomas Kavanagh
Succeeded by
Nicholas Aylward Vigors
Alexander Raphael
Preceded by
Alexander Raphael
Nicholas Aylward Vigors
Member of Parliament for Carlow County
August 1835 – August 1837
With: Thomas Kavanagh 1835 – Feb 1837
Nicholas Aylward Vigors from Feb 1837
Succeeded by
Nicholas Aylward Vigors
John Ashton Yates
Preceded by
Nicholas Aylward Vigors
John Ashton Yates
Member of Parliament for Carlow County
18401852
With: John Ashton Yates to 1841
Thomas Bunbury 1841–1846
William McClintock-Bunbury 1846–1852
John Ball from July 1852
Succeeded by
William McClintock-Bunbury
John Ball