Henry Churchill King

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Henry Churchill King
6th President of Oberlin College
In office
1902 (1902) – June 0, 1927 (1927-06-00)[1]
Preceded by John Henry Barrows
Succeeded by Ernest Hatch Wilkins
Personal details
Born (1858-09-18)September 18, 1858[1]
Hillsdale, Michigan
Died February 27, 1934(1934-02-27) (aged 75)[1]
Oberlin, Ohio[1]
Spouse(s) Julia Coates King[1]
Children Philip Coates King, Donald Storrs King, Edgar Weld King, Harold Lee King[1]
Residence Oberlin, Ohio
Alma mater Oberlin College (A.B., 1879)
Oberlin Theological Seminary (B.D., 1882)[1]
Profession theologian, educator, author
Religion Congregationalist

Henry Churchill King (1858–1934) was an American Congregationalist theologian, educator, and author.

At Oberlin from 1884, he taught in mathematics, philosophy, and theology. From 1902 to 1927, he was president of the college.[2]

In 1919, he served on the King-Crane Commission, whose recommendations on the fair and just disposition of non-Turkish areas of the Ottoman Empire might, had they been followed, would have averted many of the tragedies that have come to pass in the Middle East since that time. The findings of that commission, suppressed until 1922, were finally made public in the King-Crane Commission Report and shed tremendous light on the wishes of the indigenous peoples of the region, as to who would be entrusted with the various mandates, the future of Palestine, and other vital issues.

He was prominent in the councils of the Congregational Church and a moderator (1919–21) of its National Council as well as chairman (1921–27) of the Congregational Foundation for Education.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Reconstruction in Theology (1901)
  • Rational Living (1905)
  • The Ethics of Jesus (1910)
  • Fundamental Questions (1917)
  • For A New America In A New World (1919)
  • The King-Crane Commission Report (August 28, 1919)
  • Seeing Life Whole (1923)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "RG 2/6 - Henry Churchill King (1858-1934)," Oberlin College Archives. Accessed Dec. 17, 2013.
  2. ^ "Presidents of Oberlin Colleges". Oberlin College Archives. Oberlin College. Retrieved 21 October 2013.