Henry Franklin Kilburn

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Henry Franklin Kilburn
18910725.NYC.WestParkPresby.American Architect and Building News.jpg
West-Park Presbyterian Church, Amsterdam Avenue Facade Entrance, Upper West Side, New York City, 1889
Born February 20, 1844[1]
Ashfield, Massachusetts[1]
Died September 26, 1905[1]
New York City, New York[1]
Nationality USA
Known for Architect

Henry Franklin Kilburn, FAIA, (February 20, 1844, Ashfield, Massachusetts — September 26, 1905, New York City) was an American architect active in late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century New York City who is particularly associated with church architecture.[2] Although he practiced for a number of years, only toward the end of his career, however, was Kilburn primarily active with ecclesiastical commissions; the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission reports that "Kilburn was also the architect of many private residences, factories, stables, and theaters in Manhattan."[1]

Life[edit]

Born in Ashfield, Massachusetts, Kilburn served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. After the war, he went to stu­dy and prac­tice ar­chi­tec­ture in Northampton, Massachusetts. Around 1869, at the age of twenty-five, he set up a practice in New York City and was elec­ted a prac­ticing mem­ber of the New York Chap­ter of the American Institute of Architects in 1896. "He was a mem­ber of the Ar­chi­tec­tu­ral Le­ague of New York and a num­ber of clubs and as­so­cia­ti­ons. He was elec­ted an As­so­ciate of the Ame­ri­can In­sti­tute of Ar­chi­tects in 1886 and a Fel­low in 1889."[3]

Much of Kilburn's work has not survived, and that which has, has been under threat of demolition or general dilapidation for many years. He worked in a variety of styles, producing all derivative work of other fashionable architect's styles, including Richardsonian Romanesque and Stanford White's refined Italianate style.[2] This was often due to his designing the more substantial additions or extensions of buildings. He established his practice in New York City around 1865.[2]

Works[edit]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. "Designation List 425"
  2. ^ a b c d e Mosette Broderick and Lauren Jacobi (Committee to Preserve West-Park Presbyterian Church of the Friends of West-Park, a not-for-profit NY State corporation). Landmark: West-Park Presbyterian Church; West-Park Presbyterian: Landmarking a Cultural and Architectural Icon (October 2007)
  3. ^ archINFORM
  4. ^ THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK COUNCIL MEMBER GALE A. BREWER.[1] "TESTIMONY BEFORE THE LANDMARKS PRESERVATION COMMISSION, JULY 14, 2009, Council Member Gale A. Brewer, 6th District, West Side of Manhattan"
  5. ^ "Block 1217 Lot 1"[2] The Upper West Side Book
  6. ^ "Wired New York - Forum"
  7. ^ Robert A. M. Stern, Thomas Mellins, and David Fishman, New York 1880: Architecture and Urbanism in the Gilded Age (New York City: The Monacelli Press, 1999), pp.770, 772, 773
  8. ^ Robert Miles Parker, The Upper West Side, New York (New York City: Harry N. Abrams, 1988), p.125
  9. ^ Norval White and Elliot Willensky, AIA Guide to New York City, rev. ed., (New York: Collier Books, 1978), p.196.
  10. ^ Kathryn E. Holliden, Leopold Eidlitz: Architecture and Idealism in the Gilded Age (New York: W. W. Norton and Company, 2008), p.171
  11. ^ Thomas Vitullo-Martin, co-chair of Friends of West-Park, quoted in Nadine Brozan, “Sacred Space But Earthly Challenges,” New York Times (25 April 2004)
  12. ^ Dolkart, Andrew S; Postal, Matthew A. (2004). Guide to New York City Landmarks. New York City Landmarks Preservation Committee. Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg (Author of Forward) (Third ed.). Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons. p. 313. 
  13. ^ New York Public Library NYPL Digital Library
  14. ^ New York Public Library NYPL Digital Library
  15. ^ "COLONIAL CLUB'S HOT ELECTION.; Four Tickets in the Field and Plenty of Hard Work Done."[3]New York Times. (May 2, 1893)
  16. ^ The World Almanac 1892 and Book of Facts (New York: Press Publishing, 1892), p.390.
  17. ^ The Upper East Side Book: 825 Fifth Avenue
  18. ^ New York Public Library NYPL Digital Gallery
  19. ^ Office for Metropolitan History, [4] "Manhattan NB Database 1900-1986," (24 Feb 2010), http://www.MetroHistory.com