Henry James (biographer)

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Henry James (May 18, 1879[1] – December 13, 1947[2]) was an American writer who won the Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography in 1931. He was the son of philosopher and psychologist William James, nephew of novelist Henry James.[1]

Born in Boston, Massachusetts, James graduated with an A.B. from Harvard University in 1899 and a Bachelor of Laws from Harvard Law School in 1904. He practiced law in Boston until 1912, when he became business manager of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research.[1] During World War I he was a member of the Rockefeller Foundation's War Relief Commission, served as a private in the 89th Infantry Division, and was commissioned as a lieutenant.[1][2] In 1917, he married Olivia Cutting, daughter of financier William Bayard Cutting.[2][3] After their divorce, he married Dorothea Draper Bladgen in 1938.[2]

James wrote Richard Olney and His Public Service (1923), a biography of the United States Secretary of State, and Charles W. Eliot, President of Harvard University, 1869-1901 (1930), the biography which won him the Pulitzer, and edited The Letters of William James (1921).

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Heinz Dietrich Fischer; Erika J. Fischer (October 2002). Complete biographical encyclopedia of Pulitzer Prize winners, 1917-2000: journalists, writers and composers on their ways to the coveted awards. Walter de Gruyter. p. 115. ISBN 978-3-598-30186-5. Retrieved 22 August 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Henry James, Head of Annuity Board: Winner of '30 Pulitzer Prize for Biography Dies - Novelist's Nephew, Philosopher's Son". The New York Times. December 15, 1947. p. 25. 
  3. ^ "MISS CUTTING ONE OF BRIDES OF A DAY: DAUGHTER OF MRS. BAYARD CUTTING MARRIES HENRY JAMES OF ROCKEFELLER INSTITUTE". The New York Times. 12 June 1917. p. 13. 

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