Henry McBride (politician)

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Henry McBride
16495-Henry-McBride.jpg
4th Governor of Washington
In office
December 26, 1901 – January 9, 1905
Preceded by John Rankin Rogers
Succeeded by Albert E. Mead
4th Lieutenant Governor of Washington
In office
1901 – December 26, 1901
Governor John Rankin Rogers
Preceded by Thurston Daniels
Succeeded by Charles E. Coon
Personal details
Born February 7, 1856
Farmington, Utah
Died October 7, 1937 (aged 81)
Seattle, Washington
Political party Republican

Henry McBride (February 7, 1856 – October 7, 1937) was the fourth Governor of Washington state, United States from 1901 to 1905. He was the first governor of Washington to be born in a western state.

Biography[edit]

Born in Farmington, Utah, McBride studied for the priesthood of the Episcopal Church at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut, but did not complete his course of study due to illness.

Career[edit]

McBride moved to Washington Territory in 1882 and taught school at Oak Harbor on Whidbey Island while he studied law. He married Alice Garrett on February 7, 1884.[1] From 1887 to 1889 he was a practicing attorney in partnership with E. M. Carr and Harold Preston. He was prosecuting attorney for the counties of Whatcom, Skagit, and Snohomish from 1889 to 1891.

Appointed by Governor Elisha P. Ferry in 1891, and elected to a full four-year term in 1892, he served as Superior Court Judge for the Skagit and Island counties from 1891 to 1896.

Elected to the office of Lieutenant Governor of the state of Washington in 1900, he became Governor upon the death of Governor John Rankin Rogers on December 26, 1901 and served until 1905. After leaving office, he returned to his law practice, served as president of a savings and loan association, and worked in the lumber business.[2]

Death[edit]

McBride died on October 7, 1937, in Seattle, Washington, and is interred at Evergreen Washelli Memorial Park in Seattle, Washington.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Henry McBride". Washington Secretary of State. Retrieved 10 October 2012. 
  2. ^ "Henry McBride". National Governors Association. Retrieved 11 October 2012. 
  3. ^ "Henry McBride". Find A Grave. Retrieved 11 October 2012. 

Further reading[edit]

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