Henry Stommel Research Award

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The Henry Stommel Research Award is awarded by the American Meteorological Society to researchers in recognition of outstanding contributions to the advancement of the understanding of the dynamics and physics of the ocean. The award is in the form of a medallion and was named for Henry Stommel.


Recipients[edit]

Year[A] Recipient Rationale
1995 Melvin E. Stern "for profound and original contributions to the development of geophysical fluid dynamics and its application to the physics of the ocean circulation"
1996 Joseph L. Reid "for fundamental contributions to a quantitative understanding of the global circulation, based on detailed and insightful analyses of hydrographic observations"
1997 George Veronis "for a wide range of fundamental contributions to the development of physical oceanography and geophysical fluid dynamics"
1998 Nicholas P. Fofonoff "for his fundamental work on the general circulation and the physical properties of the ocean and for development of observational techniques in physical oceanography"
1999 Peter B. Rhines "for amazing physical insight and profound appreciation of observations as a guide to understanding how the ocean works"
2000 Carl I. Wunsch "for his leadership in understanding the circulation of the global ocean, and his insistence that our understanding and models be based upon and assessed through direct observations."
2001 Christopher J. R. Garrett "for his rare ability to use simple models or concepts to expose the rich underlying physics that leads us all to a more profound understanding of ocean processes"
2002 Nelson G. Hogg "for elucidating the structure and dynamics of the ocean circulation through observation, analysis, and theory"
2003 Harry L. Bryden "for fundamental and elegant observational contributions to understanding the oceanic general circulation"
2004 Friedrich A. Schott "for systematically undertaking observations in challenging environments and for bold interpretation leading to greater understanding of the ocean circulation"
2005 John S. Allen "for his insightful and rigorous elucidation of ocean processes over the continental shelf and slope"
2006 Michael C. Gregg "for outstanding and comprehensive measurements of turbulence and mixing in many oceanic environments, and particularly for establishing a quantitative relationship

between pelagic mixing rates and the energy of internal waves"

2007 John A. Whitehead “For his fundamental contributions to Geophysical Fluid Dynamics and Physical Oceanography, for which his laboratory and observational studies of rotating hydraulic flows have been particularly illuminating.”
2008 Peter D. Killworth “For his many important contributions to ocean modeling and theoretical oceanography, which have significantly extended our knowledge of the processes governing ocean circulation”
2009 Kirk Bryan, Jr. “For pioneering contributions to ocean circulation modeling, including model development and applications to the study of ocean heat transport and the ocean's role in climate”
2010 Thomas B. Sanford "For pioneering development of unique instruments based on electromagnetic sensors and for using them to unravel key features of ocean dynamics"


References[edit]

Notes

^ A. The information in the table is according to the "American Meteorological Society Awards and Nomination Information" web page at the official website of the American Meteorological Society, unless otherwise specified by additional citations.

External links[edit]