Henry Stram

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Henry Stram
Born (1954-09-10) September 10, 1954 (age 59)
Lafayette, Indiana, United States
Occupation Actor, Singer
Known for See What I Wanna See

Henry Stram (born September 10, 1954) is an American actor. He is also the son of the famous NFL coach Hank Stram.

Early life[edit]

Stram grew up in Kansas City while his father was the coach of the Kansas City Chiefs. He performed with The Barn Players until he moved to New York City in 1973 and studied acting at the Juilliard School.[1] While at Juilliard, he frequented Cafe La Fortuna, a cafe that opened in 1976 and was known for its garden, opera music and Italian desserts.[2]

In 2012, he participated in Shinsai, which was a benefit concert to support the victims of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster along with Patti LuPone, Richard Thomas, Mary Beth Hurt, Jay O. Sanders, Jennifer Lim and Angela Lin.[3] The same year, he was in the cast of Rebecca,[4] but the show was closed after it was discovered one of the investors never existed with a following criminal investigation. Ben Sprecher, a producer, hopes it will have a run in 2013.[5]

Personal life[edit]

Stram has been with actor Martin Moran since they met while rehearsing The Making of Americans together in 1985. They since have done many shows together. Moran said of their meeting in a 2006 interview, "I remember what a surprise, what a thrill it was, when the coolest actor in the group the one who'd worked with Richard Foreman and at the Guthrie and graduated from Juilliard! started walking me to my subway stop after rehearsals. That was February 1985, twenty-one Valentine Days ago. Since then, we've made a life together through the vagaries of this nutty, blessed business".[6]

Stage credits[edit]

Broadway[edit]

Off-Broadway[edit]

Off-off Broadway[edit]

  • Eddie Goes to Poetry City (Part 2) (1991) -- La MaMa
  • The Mind King (1992) -- St. Mark's Theatre/Ontological-Hysteric Theatre
  • My Head Was a Sledge Hammer (1994) -- St. Mark's Theatre/Ontological-Hysteric Theatre

Regional[edit]

Filmography[edit]

Film[edit]

Television[edit]

Controversy[edit]

Stram came under fire in 2009 while performing in the Rebecca Gilman stage adaption of The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers. Stram was playing a deaf character, and since he is not in real life, it was said of him, "A hearing actor playing a deaf character is tantamount to putting a white actor in blackface" by a member of the board of the Alliance for Inclusion in the Arts. The National Association of the Deaf, Deaf West Theater, and others demanded that Mr. Hughes and the New York Theater Workshop demanded he be replaced by an actual deaf actor. Stram had played the role in 2005 in the premiere of the show in Atlanta[8]

References[edit]

External links[edit]