Henry Taylor (clergyman)

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Henry Taylor (1711–1785) was a Church of England clergyman and religious controversialist.

Henry Taylor was educated at Newcome's School in Hackney,[1] and then at Queens' College, Cambridge.[2] He was Rector of Wheatfield, Oxfordshire from 1737 to 1746,[3] Vicar of Portsmouth from 1745 and Rector of Crawley from 1755. He was an Arian who used various pseudonyms in religious controversies with William Warburton, Soame Jenyns and Edward Gibbon.

Works[edit]

  • (as Indignatio), Confusion Worse Confounded, 1772. (Against Warburton)
  • (anon.)A Full Answer to a ... Late View of the Internal Evidence of Christian Religion, 1777. (Against Jenyns)
  • (as Khalid E'bn Abdallah), An Enquiry into the Opinions of the Learned Christians, 1777
  • Thoughts on the nature of the grand apostacy; with reflections on the 15th chapter of Mr Gibbon's History, 1781
  • The apology of Benjamin Ben Mordecai to his friends, for embracing Christianity; in seven letters to Elisha Levi ... together with an eighth letter, on the generation of Jesus Christ, 1784

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rae Blanchard, A Prologue and an Epilogue for Nicholas Rowe's Tamerlane by Richard Steele, PMLA Vol. 47, No. 3 (Sep., 1932), pp. 772-776, at p. 773. Published by: Modern Language Association. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/457953
  2. ^ "Taylor, Henry (TLR727H)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  3. ^ Lobel, Mary D, ed. (1969). A History of the County of Oxford: Volume 8: Lewknor and Pyrton Hundreds. Victoria County History. pp. 263–273. 

External links[edit]