Henry de Lacy, 3rd Earl of Lincoln

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Henry de Lacy
Earl of Lincoln
Predecessor Margaret de Quincy, 2nd Countess of Lincoln
Successor Alice de Lacy, 4th Countess of Lincoln
Spouse(s) Margaret Longespée

Issue

Alice de Lacy
Father Edmund de Lacy, Baron of Pontefract
Mother Alasia of Saluzzo
Born c. 1251
Died February 1311 (aged around 60)
Lincoln's Inn, London, England
Buried Saint Paul's Cathedral

Henry de Lacy, 3rd Earl of Lincoln, Baron of Pontefract (c.1251 – February 1311) was an English nobleman and confidant of Edward I of England.

Life[edit]

Seal of Henry de Lacy

Henry was the son of Edmund de Lacy, Baron of Pontefract who died when he was only a child. He was also heir to his paternal grandmother Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln who died when he was a teenager. As ward to large and important estates from both his father and more importantly his grandmother, he was educated at court.

In 1258 he had inherited his titles and lands from his father, which included Baron of Pontefract, Baron of Halton, and Constable of Chester and in about 1266 he had inherited his titles and lands, which included the Earl of Lincoln, from his paternal grandmother Margaret de Quincy. However being a minor in both cases his inheritance was held in a wardship by his mother, and with the help of his grandmother in the years before her death. In 1272,[1] on reaching the age of majority, which was 21, he became the Earl of Lincoln.

He became Chief Councillor to Edward I. While the king was engaged on military conflicts with the Scots, Henry was appointed Protector of the Realm.

Following the English Conquest of Wales in 1282 (known in Wales as the Norman Conquest) in which Henry took part, he was granted the Lordship of Denbigh. He authorised the building of Denbigh Castle.[2]

In November 1300, he was sent on a mission to Rome to complain to the Pope about injury done by the Scots.[3]

He was Lord of Pontefract, the 10th Baron of Halton, and Lord of Denbigh. He was also the 7th Lord of Bowland, so-called Lord of the Fells, being the last member of his family to hold that title.

He transferred the monastery from Stanlow to Whalley.[4] He is the addressee, or joint composer, of a poem (a tenson) by Walter of Bibbesworth about crusading, La pleinte par entre missire Henry de Lacy et sire Wauter de Bybelesworthe pur la croiserie en la terre seinte.

Marriage and progeny[edit]

He married twice:

Death[edit]

He died at his London home, Lincoln's Inn, and was buried in Saint Paul's Cathedral.

Ancestry[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ He was knighted this year, and seems to have taken seisin of his lands and title at the same time: J. S. Hamilton, 'Lacy, Henry de, fifth earl of Lincoln (1249–1311)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, Jan 2008 (accessed 29 Jan 2008)
  2. ^ Denbigh History
  3. ^ J. S. Hamilton, ‘Lacy, Henry de, fifth earl of Lincoln (1249–1311)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008 accessed 13 May 2013
  4. ^ Kingsford
  5. ^ Douglas Richardson. Magna Carta Ancestry, Genealogical Publishing, 2004. pg 481.
  6. ^ Sanders, Ivor, English Baronies, Oxford, 1960, p.105
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Margaret de Quincy
2nd Countess of Lincoln suo jure
Earl of Lincoln
1272–1311
Succeeded by
together with her spouse
Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster,
Earl of Lincoln
jure uxoris

Alice de Lacy
4th Countess of Lincoln suo jure