Herbert Parsons

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For the Australian politician, see Herbert Angas Parsons.
Herbert Parsons
Herbertparsons.jpg
Born (1869-10-28)October 28, 1869
New York City
Died September 16, 1925(1925-09-16) (aged 55)
Pittsfield, Massachusetts
Education Yale University (1890)
Occupation Lawyer, Congressman
Spouse(s) Elsie Worthington Clews
Children Elsie ("Lissa," 1901), John Edward (1903), Herbert (1909), and Henry McIlvaine ("Mac", 1911).
Parents John Edward Parsons, Mary Dumesnil McIlvaine

Herbert Parsons (October 28, 1869 - September 16, 1925) was a U.S. Representative from New York.

Born in New York City, Parsons attended private schools in New York City, St. Paul's School, Concord, New Hampshire, Yale University, the University of Berlin, Harvard Law School, and was graduated from Yale University in 1890. He was admitted to the bar in 1894 and commenced practice in New York City. He served as member of the board of aldermen of New York City 1900-1904.

Parsons married Elsie Clews in Newport, Rhode Island on September 1, 1900.[1] He was elected as a Republican to the Fifty-ninth, Sixtieth, and Sixty-first Congresses (March 4, 1905-March 3, 1911). A 1910 run for reelection to the Sixty-second Congress was unsuccessful, and Parsons resumed the practice of law in New York City.

He served as delegate to all Republican New York State conventions from 1904 to 1920, and to the Republican National Conventions in 1908, 1912, 1916, and 1920. During the First World War he served on the general staff of the American Expeditionary Forces.

Parsons died in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, September 16, 1925. He was interred in Lenox Cemetery.

Source[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Miss Clews is Married". The New York Times (Newport, Massachusetts). 1900-09-02. p. 5. Retrieved 2010-01-01. 

External links[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Francis B. Harrison
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 13th congressional district

March 4, 1905 – March 3, 1911
Succeeded by
Jefferson M. Levy

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.