Hermann Paul Müller

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Hermann Paul Müller
Nationality Germany German
Born (1909-11-21)21 November 1909
Bielefeld, Germany
Died 30 December 1975(1975-12-30) (aged 66)
Ingolstadt, West Germany
Motorcycle racing career statistics
Grand Prix motorcycle racing
Active years 1952 - 1955
First race 1952 125cc Spanish Grand Prix
Last race 1955 250cc Nations Grand Prix
First win 1955 250cc German Grand Prix
Last win 1955 250cc German Grand Prix
Team(s) NSU
Championships 250cc - 1955
Starts Wins Podiums Poles F. laps Points
14 1 7 N/A N/A N/A

Hermann Paul Müller (born in Bielefeld, 21 November 1909 - died in Ingolstadt, 30 December 1975) was a German sidecar, motorcycle, and race car driver.

Müller started his competitive career on an Imperia in 1928. He became German Sidecar Champion in 1932, then in 1936, he took the German 500cc Motorcycle title.

He switched to cars the next year, driving for Auto Union. He won the 1939 edition of the FIA French Grand Prix held in Reims. The winner of that season's European Championship was never officially announced by the AIACR due to the outbreak of World War II. Although Müller would have won the championship on points, the president of Germany's highest motorsports organisation declared Hermann Lang the champion.[1]

After the war he returned to motorcycle racing, winning the 1947 and 1948 German 250cc titles on DKW. In 1955, he won the 250cc world championship riding an NSU Sportmax. He also set quite a number of world speed records in five classes over six distances for NSU on the Bonneville salt flats in 1956. To this day he remains the oldest person to win a Grand Prix Motorcycle world championship, at the age of 46.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Armstrong, Richard. "Unfinished Symphony: Why the 1939 European Championship was never won". 8W. Retrieved 2007-08-05. 
The NSU motorcycle with which Müller won the 1955 250 cc World Championship.
Sporting achievements
Preceded by
Werner Haas
250cc Motorcycle World Champion
1955
Succeeded by
Carlo Ubbiali