Heroes of the Alamo

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For other films about the Alamo, see Alamo_(disambiguation)#Films.
Heroes of the Alamo
Heroesofthealamo1.jpg
original film poster
Directed by Harry L. Fraser
Produced by Anthony J. Xydias
Written by Roby Wentz
Starring Bruce Warren
Lane Chandler
Earl Hodgins
Rex Lease
Roger Williams
Music by Lee Zahler
Cinematography Robert Cline
Distributed by Sunset Productions
Columbia Pictures
Astor Pictures
Release dates United States 24 September 1937
Running time 75 min.
Country  United States
Language English

Heroes of the Alamo (1937) is a low-budget retelling of the events of the Texas Revolution and the Battle of the Alamo. It was produced by Anthony J. Xydias and reuses the battle scenes of his 1926 silent film Davy Crockett at the Fall of the Alamo. About 35 minutes of the latter film is available on the DVD of Heroes of the Alamo, all that remains of the silent film.

Plot[edit]

Unlike other Alamo films that concentrate on Davy Crockett and Jim Bowie, the main protagonists are Almaron (Bruce Warren) and Susanna Dickinson (Ruth Findlay) and their daughter Angelina (Marilyn Haslett). The film gives a fictionalised fast moving account of the restriction on American emigration to Texas, the arrest of Stephen F. Austin by Santa Anna (Julian Rivero), Sam Houston (Edward Piel) appointed General to build the army of Texas, and Dickinson's participation in both the Battle of Gonzales and the Battle of the Alamo.

Cast[edit]

Release[edit]

After producing two 1935 Westerns, Xydias ambitiously announced the production of epic films about Buffalo Bill, Sitting Bull, George Armstrong Custer, Daniel Boone and Davy Crockett in 1937-1938 that were remakes of his Sunset Productions silent films,[1] however only the Alamo film was made. Xydias had planned the film as a tie in with the 1936 Texas Centennial but fell behind in his plans.[1]

Columbia Pictures acquired the film for 1938 release[2] and changed the billing of the actors in the film.

The film featured the song The Yellow Rose of Texas being sung by the defenders though it had not been written at that time.

This was the last film Xydias produced. When World War II broke out he was in the Philippines and was interned by the Japanese.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b p.36 Thompson, Frank Alamo Movies 1991 Woodware Productions
  2. ^ p.244 Dick, Bernard F. Columbia Pictures:Portrait of a Studio 1992 University Press of Kentucky

External links[edit]