Heroes of the Storm

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This article is about the video game. For the Finnish role-playing game formerly titled Heroes of the Storm, see Age of the Tempest.
Heroes of the Storm
Heroes of the Storm logo.png
Developer(s) Blizzard Entertainment
Publisher(s) Blizzard Entertainment
Composer(s) Glenn Stafford
Jason Hayes
Platform(s) Microsoft Windows, OS X
Release date(s)
  • TBC
Genre(s) Multiplayer online battle arena
Mode(s) Multiplayer
Distribution Download

Heroes of the Storm is an upcoming multiplayer online battle arena video game developed by Blizzard Entertainment for Microsoft Windows and OS X. The basis of the game is the combination of heroes from Blizzard's Warcraft, Diablo, and StarCraft franchises and the game is set in the Nexus. It is a free-to-play digitally distributed online game, supported by micropayments.[1][2] Blizzard does not call the game a "multiplayer online battle arena" or an "action real-time strategy" because they feel it is something different with a broader playstyle; they refer to it as a "Hero Brawler".[3] The game entered a limited Technical Alpha testing phase on March 13, 2014.[4]

Gameplay[edit]

Heroes of the Storm is a game that revolves around online 5 versus 5 matches, operated through Blizzard's Battle.net. Players can choose from three game modes and can play with/against AI or other players. When players first start the game the heroes rotate each week, but by using gold earned in-game gold or a by making a real money purchase, they can gain permanent access to a hero. Killing enemy/neutral units and the opposing side's heroes grant experience points for the entire team. When enough experience is gained you level up, giving access to a talent point that allows a player to customize their skill set and abilities.

Development[edit]

As a part of the arcade feature for StarCraft II: Wings of Liberty, a custom map called "Blizzard DOTA" was announced alongside several other mods of Blizzard Entertainment at BlizzCon 2010.[5] At that time, the map was developed to showcase the modding abilities that were to be added to StarCraft II.[6] In 2011, however, development of Blizzard DOTA was rebooted and demoed at BlizzCon 2011.[7][8] In comparison to the previous iteration previewed at BlizzCon 2010, the gameplay was described as "fast" and "streamlined".[9][10]

Following the announcement of Dota 2 by Valve Corporation, Rob Pardo, the executive vice president of Blizzard Entertainment, expressed concern at Valve using and trademarking a name that originated from within the Warcraft III community. Following a failed trademark injunction on the part of Riot Games, Blizzard acquired Riot's subsidiary, DotA-Allstars, LLC., the original company that represented the servicing of Defense of the Ancients. Subsequently, Blizzard filed an opposition against Valve for claiming the DotA trademark.[11] On May 11, 2012, Blizzard and Valve announced that the dispute had been settled, with Valve retaining the commercial franchising rights to the term "Dota", while Blizzard would change the name of Blizzard DOTA to Blizzard All-Stars.[12]

In June 2012, Dustin Browder, the director of StarCraft II, stated that Blizzard All-Stars did not have a release date, but that it would definitely be after the release of StarCraft II: Heart of the Swarm.[2] In an interview in January 2013, he noted that parts of the game were "starting to feel really good", with "a really tight multiplayer experience", but that there was no way to project a timeline on it, since it was not complete enough to run a company-wide internal alpha test.[13] In February 2013, the Activision Blizzard fourth quarter 2012 earnings report listed Blizzard All-Stars as one of the areas of continued investment for Blizzard throughout 2013.[14] Dustin Browder commented in March 2013 that a few artists had transitioned from the StarCraft II: Heart of the Swarm team, to work on Blizzard All-Stars for the time being along with the few designers on the team.[15]

In August 2013, Blizzard president Mike Morhaime said that the game had reached a significant internal testing milestone, and was going into wider internal testing. Describing it as an "action real-time strategy" game, he said that Blizzard was looking to put their own spin on the genre and challenge some of the existing design paradigms. The Blizzard All-Stars team was expanded in May 2013, from some of the resources who were reallocated when Blizzard's Project Titan project was rebooted and the team downsized.[16] On October 17, 2013, the name of the game was changed to Heroes of the Storm.[17]

On November 8, Game director Dustin Browder detailed some of the battlegrounds at BlizzCon 2013, and announced that signups for the public beta were available on Blizzard's website.[18] The game entered a Technical Alpha testing phase on March 13, 2014.[4]

Sound[edit]

The lead composer for Heroes of the Storm is Glenn Stafford and additional work is done by Jason Hayes.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Yin-Poole, Wesley (January 22, 2013). "Blizzard "actively working" on Blizzard All-Stars, so what's the hold up?". Eurogamer.net. Archived from the original on May 6, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Browder, Dustin (June 2012). Dustin Browder Interview - MLG Anaheim 2012. Interview with StarCraft: Legacy. Archived from the original on October 13, 2012. 
  3. ^ Gaston, Martin (November 9, 2013). "Blizzard explains why it doesn't call Heroes of the Storm a MOBA". GameSpot. Retrieved November 17, 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "The Heroes of the Storm Technical Alpha is Now LIVE!". Blizzard Entertainment. 13 March 2014. Retrieved 14 March 2014. 
  5. ^ Funk, John (October 22, 2010). "BlizzCon 2010: Hands-On Blizzard DotA, Left 2 Die, Starjeweled". The Escapist Magazine. Archived from the original on October 26, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Blizzard DotA - BlizzCon 2010 - Matt Gotcher, StarCraft II Level Designer". YouTube.com. October 23, 2010. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  7. ^ Yin-Poole, Wesley (August 22, 2011). "Blizzard DOTA "completely rebooted"". Eurogamer.net. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  8. ^ "StarCraft II – Blizzard All Stars & Mod Tools Panel". Blizzard Entertainment. October 22, 2011. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  9. ^ McCurley, Mathew (October 21, 2011). "Hands-on with Blizzard DOTA: Tweaking the genre it created". Joystiq.com. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  10. ^ Johnson, Leif (October 23, 2011). "BlizzCon 2011: Blizzard DOTA Impressions". GameSpy. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  11. ^ Plunkett, Luke (February 10, 2012). "Blizzard and Valve go to War Over DOTA Name". Kotaku. Archived from the original on June 4, 2012. 
  12. ^ Reilly, Jim (May 11, 2012). "Valve, Blizzard Reach DOTA Trademark Agreement". Game Informer. Archived from the original on July 24, 2012. 
  13. ^ "January 17 Dustin Browder Interview". Starcraft Legacy. January 17, 2013. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  14. ^ Bramblet, Matthew (February 7, 2013). "Activision Blizzard Q4 2012 Earnings Report". diablo.somepage.com. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  15. ^ "Reddit AMA Full Transcript - Dustin Browder, Alan Dabiri, David Kim". Blizzard Entertainment. March 6, 2013. Retrieved March 17, 2013. 
  16. ^ Bramblet, Matthew (August 1, 2013). "Diablo III Announcement Coming at Gamescon - Activision Blizzard Q2 2013 earnings report details the Blizzard All-Star progress and 'Project Titan' revamp". Diablo Somepage. Retrieved September 22, 2013. 
  17. ^ Narcisse, Evan (October 17, 2013). "Blizzard’s Diablo/Starcraft/WoW Crossover Has a New Name". Kotaku. 
  18. ^ Dyer, Mitch (November 8, 2013). "Heroes of the Storm: Battlegrounds Revealed, Beta Signups Open". IGN. 

External links[edit]