Herschel Lynn Greer

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Herschel Lynn Greer
Herschel Lynn Greer.JPG
Born Herschel Lynn Greer
1906
Dickson County, Tennessee
Died (aged 69)[1]
Nationality American
Occupation Founder of Guaranty Mortgage Company
President of Vols, Inc.
Set against a natural stone wall, a black plaque with silver text reads, "Greer Stadium. Located in Fort Negley Park this stadium was constructed with private funds on land leased to the Nashville Sounds by the Metropolitan Board of Parks and Recreation of Nashville and Davidson County. The stadium was opened on April 25, 1978.
A plaque at the concourse entrance to Herschel Greer Stadium

Herschel Lynn Greer (1906–March 19, 1976, born in Dickson County, Tennessee) was a prominent businessman and the first president of Vols, Inc., an ownership group organized in 1959 for the purpose of keeping the Nashville Vols minor league baseball franchise in Nashville, Tennessee.

Greer worked in the financial sector, co-organizing Guaranty Mortgage Company in 1940. He served as its President and Chairman of the Board until 1969. In January 1959, Greer and thirteen other Nashville businessmen, including country music star Eddy Arnold, formed Vols, Inc. The company sold 4,876 shares of stock at $5 each. Vols, Inc. was successful in keeping the team in Nashville from 1959 to 1961. The Southern Association, of which the Vols were members, collapsed in 1961, and as a result the team did not play in 1962. In 1963 the Vols played one season in the South Atlantic League, which would be their last. The team had a debt of $22,000 that could not be paid, forcing the ownership group to surrender their franchise to the league. This was the last year that professional baseball was played at Sulphur Dell, the home of the Vols.

Greer died in 1976. Two years later, in 1978, Larry Schmittou brought the Nashville Sounds, an expansion team of the Southern League, to Nashville. The Greer family donated $25,000 for construction of the team's new stadium. The new ballpark was named "Herschel Greer Stadium" in his honor.

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ Woody, Larry. Schmittou: A Grand Slam in Baseball, Business, And Life. Nashville: Eggmann Publishing Company, 1996: 89. ISBN 1886371334