Hew Fraser

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Olympic medal record
Men's field hockey
Bronze 1908 London Team

Hew Thomson Fraser (25 July 1877 – 11 August 1938) was a Scottish field hockey player and British Liberal Party politician.

He was born in Glasgow.[1]

In 1908, he competed in the 1908 Summer Olympics, he won the bronze medal as member of the Scotland Hockey team.

He moved to London in 1920. He worked as an Insurance Broker.[2]

He was Liberal parliamentary candidate for the Wood Green Division of Middlesex from 1929 to 1938. He fought the 1929 General Election, coming second, pushing the Labour candidate into third place.

Wood Green in the county of Middlesex, showing boundaries used 1929-35
General Election 1929: Wood Green[3]

Electorate 71,445

Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Unionist Rt Hon. Godfrey Lampson Tennyson Locker-Lampson 24,821 47.6
Liberal Hew Thomson Fraser 14,995 28.7
Labour E P Bell 12,360 23.7
Majority 9,826 18.9
Turnout 73.0
Unionist hold Swing

Following the formation of the National Government in 1931, there was another General Election. As the Liberals and Conservatives were partners in that government, the Wood Green Liberal Association decided not to oppose the sitting Conservative MP. At the following General Election, after the Liberals had moved into opposition, Fraser again contested Wood Green for the Liberals, but this time finished third.

General Election 1935: Wood Green[4]

Electorate 84,841

Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Arthur Beverley Baxter 36,384 62.0
Labour Miss Dorothy Woodman 14,561 24.8
Liberal Hew Thomson Fraser 7,711 13.2
Majority 21,823 37.2
Turnout 58,656 69.1
Conservative hold Swing

After his death, his wife remained active for the Liberals in Wood Green.[5]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Times Guide to the House of Commons, 1929
  2. ^ The Times Guide to the House of Commons, 1929
  3. ^ British Parliamentary Election Results 1918-1949, FWS Craig
  4. ^ http://www.politicsresources.net/area/uk/ge35/i20.htm
  5. ^ The Liberal Magazine, 1939