Hewitt Bostock

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Hewitt Bostock, PC (May 31, 1864 – April 28, 1930) was a Canadian publisher, businessman and politician.

He was born in Walton Heath, Epsom, England and studied at Trinity College, Cambridge graduating with honours in mathematics.[1] Bostock then studied law and was called to the bar in 1888. Rather than begin a legal practice he toured North America, Australia, New Zealand, China and Japan before settling in British Columbia in 1893 starting a ranch and lumber company.

He founded the Province newspaper and then entered politics winning election to the Canadian House of Commons as a Liberal in the 1896 election, representing the riding of Yale—Cariboo for one term (until the 1900 election).

In 1904, he was appointed to the Canadian Senate by the prime minister, Wilfrid Laurier. A decade later he became Leader of the Opposition in the Canadian Senate. Bostock broke with the Laurier Liberals over the Conscription Crisis of 1917, and became a Liberal-Unionist, campaigning in favour of the Union government of Sir Robert Borden during the 1917 election.

Following World War I, Bostock reconciled with the Liberals and, in 1921, became Minister of Public Works in the Liberal government of William Lyon Mackenzie King. Several months later, in 1922, he became Speaker of the Canadian Senate and held the position until his death in 1930. In 1925, he served as a member of the Canadian delegation to the Assembly of the League of Nations.

There is a Mount Hewitt Bostock (2183 m or 7162 ft)[2] named in his honour[3] in the northern end of the Canadian Cascades, about 20 kilometres northeast of the Fraser Canyon town of Boston Bar, which is in what had been the riding of Yale—Cariboo where his political career began (today in Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon).

References[edit]

Parliament of Canada
Preceded by
The electoral district
was created in 1892.
Member of Parliament for Yale—Cariboo
1896–1900
Succeeded by
William Alfred Galliher
Political offices
Preceded by
George William Ross
Leader of the Opposition in the Senate of Canada
1914–1919
Succeeded by
Raoul Dandurand
Preceded by
Raoul Dandurand
Leader of the Opposition in the Senate of Canada
1920–1921
Succeeded by
James Alexander Lougheed