Heymeric de Campo

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Heymeric de Campo[1] (1395–1460) was a Dutch theologian and scholastic philosopher. He was a prominent Albertist,[2][3] and forerunner of Nicholas of Cusa. He studied at the University of Paris, and taught at Cologne (where Nicholas studied under him[4]), and Leuven.[5]

His Tractatus Problematicus began a series of polemical exchanges between the Albertists and the Thomists. The first part deals with universals, following closely John de Nova Domo, Heymeric's teacher. A belated reply was made on behalf of the Thomists by Gerard de Monte.[6][7]

He wrote a commentary on the Apocalypse.[8]

References[edit]

  • Maarten Hoenen, Academics and Intellectual Life in the Low Countries: The University Career of Heymeric de Campo (†1460), Recherches de théologie ancienne et médiévale 61 (1994), 173–209
  • Hoenen, Denys the Carthusian and Heymeric de Campo on the Pilgrimages of Children to Mont-Saint-Michel (1458), Archives d'histoire doctrinale et littéraire du moyen âge 61 (1994), 387–418
  • Anna Fredriksson Adman (2003), Heymericus de Campo: Dyalogus Super Reuelacionibus Beate Birgitte: A Critical Edition with an Introduction
  • Florian Hamann (2006), Das Siegel der Ewigkeit. Universalwissenschaft und Konziliarismus bei Heymericus de Campo

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Heymeric van Kempen, Heymeric van den Velde.
  2. ^ The Cambridge Companion to Reformation Theology - Cambridge University Press
  3. ^ Albert the Great (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)
  4. ^ H. Lawrence Bond (ed.), Selected Spiritual Writings by Nicholas of Cusa (1997), p. 4.
  5. ^ Jorge J. E. Gracia, Timothy B. Noone (editors), A Companion to Philosophy in the Middle Ages (2003), p. 316.
  6. ^ Tractatus concordiae inter Thomam et Albertum
  7. ^ Paul van Geest, Harm J. M. J. Goris, Carlo Leget, Mishtooni Bose, Aquinas as Authority: A Collection of Studies (2002), p. 12-14.
  8. ^ Derk Visser, Apocalypse As Utopian Expectation (800-1500): The Apocalypse Commentary of Berengaudus of Ferrieres and the Relationship Between Exegesis, Liturgy and Iconography (1996), p. 167.