Hi-Nella, New Jersey

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Hi-Nella, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Hi-Nella
Hi-Nella highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Hi-Nella highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Hi-Nella, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hi-Nella, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°50′12″N 75°01′19″W / 39.836551°N 75.021843°W / 39.836551; -75.021843Coordinates: 39°50′12″N 75°01′19″W / 39.836551°N 75.021843°W / 39.836551; -75.021843[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Camden
Incorporated April 23, 1929
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Meridith Dobbs (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • Clerk Phyllis Twisler[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 0.231 sq mi (0.597 km2)
 • Land 0.231 sq mi (0.597 km2)
 • Water 0.000 sq mi (0.000 km2)  0.00%
Area rank 559th of 566 in state
35th of 37 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 62 ft (19 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 870
 • Estimate (2012[10]) 867
 • Rank 539th of 566 in state
35th of 37 in county[11]
 • Density 3,773.3/sq mi (1,456.9/km2)
 • Density rank 167th of 566 in state
21st of 37 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08083 - Somerdale[12]
Area code(s) 856[13]
FIPS code 3400732220[14][2][15]
GNIS feature ID 0885256[16][2]
Website hinellaboro.com

Hi-Nella is a borough in Camden County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 870,[7][8][9] reflecting a decline of 159 (-15.5%) from the 1,029 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 16 (-1.5%) from the 1,045 counted in the 1990 Census.[17]

The Borough of Hi-Nella was created on April 23, 1929, from Clementon Township, one of seven municipalities created from the now-defunct township, and one of five new municipalities (joining Lindenwold, Pine Hill, Pine Valley and Somerdale) created on that same date.[18]

The Star-Ledger included Hi-Nella in its 2010 series of articles covering "Towns that Shouldn't Exist", citing the borough's small area, population and staff, along with its use of a double-wide trailer as a municipal building. Mayor Meredith Dobbs told The Star-Ledger that efforts to force the borough to consolidate with its neighbors would be "declared dead on arrival".[19]

Geography[edit]

Hi-Nella borough is located at 39°50′12″N 75°01′19″W / 39.836551°N 75.021843°W / 39.836551; -75.021843 (39.836551,-75.021843). According to the United States Census Bureau, Hi-Nella borough had a total area of 0.231 square miles (0.597 km2), all of which was land.[1][2]

Hi-Nella borders Gloucester Township, Somerdale and Stratford.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 160
1940 203 26.9%
1950 237 16.7%
1960 474 100.0%
1970 1,195 152.1%
1980 1,250 4.6%
1990 1,045 −16.4%
2000 1,029 −1.5%
2010 870 −15.5%
Est. 2012 867 [10] −0.3%
Population sources:
1930-2000[20] 1930[21]
1930-1990[22] 2000[23][24] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 870 people, 377 households, and 216 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,773.3 per square mile (1,456.9 /km2). There were 420 housing units at an average density of 1,821.6 per square mile (703.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 71.72% (624) White, 15.06% (131) Black or African American, 0.69% (6) Native American, 4.02% (35) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 5.63% (49) from other races, and 2.87% (25) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 10.57% (92) of the population.[7]

There were 377 households, of which 26.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.6% were married couples living together, 18.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 42.7% were non-families. 31.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.31 and the average family size was 2.97.[7]

In the borough, 20.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 13.9% from 18 to 24, 28.7% from 25 to 44, 27.8% from 45 to 64, and 9.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34.2 years. For every 100 females there were 89.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.6 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $45,469 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,794) and the median family income was $53,750 (+/- $15,403). Males had a median income of $37,222 (+/- $14,117) versus $38,804 (+/- $7,870) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $23,678 (+/- $3,470). About 13.5% of families and 13.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.0% of those under age 18 and 5.9% of those age 65 or over.[25]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[14] there were 1,029 people, 472 households, and 260 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,536.9 people per square mile (1,727.4/km2). There were 495 housing units at an average density of 2,182.5 per square mile (831.0/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 71.04% White, 19.24% African American, 3.11% Asian, 4.37% from other races, and 2.24% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.90% of the population.[23][24]

There were 472 households out of which 28.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 31.6% were married couples living together, 16.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 44.9% were non-families. 36.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.18 and the average family size was 2.83.[23][24]

In the borough the population was spread out with 25.0% under the age of 18, 10.5% from 18 to 24, 36.3% from 25 to 44, 14.5% from 45 to 64, and 13.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 89.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.8 males.[23][24]

The median income for a household in the borough was $34,948, and the median income for a family was $38,393. Males had a median income of $32,308 versus $25,759 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $19,285. About 9.9% of families and 12.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.7% of those under age 18 and 6.3% of those age 65 or over.[23][24]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Hi-Nella is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at large. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year.[5]

As of 2013, the mayor of Hi-Nella is Meredith Dobbs, whose term of office ends December 31, 2013. Members of the Borough Council are Council President David Heckman, Cathy Connolly, Kris Musk, Kevin Schules, Karen Shaw and Gary Tomar.[4]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Hi-Nella is located in the 1st Congressional District[26] and is part of New Jersey's 6th state legislative district.[8][27][28] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Hi-Nella had been in the 5th state legislative district.[29]

New Jersey's First Congressional District is represented by Rob Andrews (D, Haddon Heights).[30] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[31][32] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[33][34]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 6th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by James Beach (D, Voorhees Township) and in the General Assembly by Louis Greenwald (D, Voorhees Township) and Pamela Rosen Lampitt (D, Cherry Hill).[35] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[36] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[37]

Camden County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, its seven members elected at-large to three-year terms office on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year.[38] As of 2013, Camden County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli, Jr. (Collingswood, term ends December 31, 2014)[39], Freeholder Deputy Director Edward McDonnell (Pennsauken Township, 2013)[40], Michelle Gentek (Gloucester Township, 2015)[41], Ian K. Leonard (Camden, 2015)[42], Scot N. McCray (Camden, 2014)[43], Jeffrey L. Nash (Cherry Hill, 2015)[44] and Carmen Rodriguez (Merchantville, 2013).[45][46][47] Constitutional officers elected countywide are County Clerk Joseph Ripa,[48] Sheriff Charles H. Billingham[49] and Surrogate Patricia Egan Jones.[50]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 571 registered voters in Hi-Nella, of which 252 (44.1%) were registered as Democrats, 59 (10.3%) were registered as Republicans and 260 (45.5%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[51]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 67.5% of the vote here (249 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain, who received around 29.3% (108 votes), with 369 ballots cast among the borough's 529 registered voters, for a turnout of 69.8%.[52] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 61.9% of the vote here (216 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush, who received around 37.5% (131 votes), with 349 ballots cast among the borough's 497 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 70.2.[53]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 46.6% of the vote here (90 ballots cast), ahead of both Democrat Jon Corzine with 46.1% (89 votes) and Independent Chris Daggett with 4.1% (8 votes), with 193 ballots cast among the borough's 544 registered voters, yielding a 35.5% turnout.[54]

Education[edit]

Hi-Nella is a non-operating school district.[55] For Kindergarten through eighth grade, public school students from Hi-Nella attend school in Oaklyn as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Oaklyn Public School District.[56] The district's one facility, Oaklyn Public School, had an enrollment of 421 students in the 2010-11 school year (based on enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics.[57]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend Sterling High School, a regional high school serving students from Magnolia, Somerdale, Stratford, along with the sending districts of Hi-Nella and Laurel Springs.[58] The high school is located in Somerdale. Prior to this agreement, Hi-Nella students attended Collingswood High School.[59]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Home page, Bourough of Hi-Nella. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 28.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Hi-Nella, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Hi-Nella borough, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 5, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 4. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Hi-Nella borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed October 5, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 5, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Hi-Nella, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed October 5, 2012.
  13. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Hi-Nella, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  14. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  15. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 5, 2012.
  16. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed October 5, 2012.
  18. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 107. Accessed October 5, 2012.
  19. ^ Donohue, Brian. "Towns that shouldn't exist Part 2: Borough of Hi-Nella", The Star-Ledger, December 15, 2010. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  20. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Camden County Municipalities, 1850 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed October 5, 2012.
  21. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 715. Accessed October 5, 2012.
  22. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed October 5, 2012.
  23. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Hi-Nella borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 5, 2012.
  24. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Hi-Nella borough, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 5, 2012.
  25. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Hi-Nella borough, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 5, 2012.
  26. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  27. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 58, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  28. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  29. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 58, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  30. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  31. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  32. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  33. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  34. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  35. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 21, 2014.
  36. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  37. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  38. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  39. ^ Louis Cappelli, Jr., Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  40. ^ Edward McDonnell, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  41. ^ Freeholder Michelle Gentek, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  42. ^ Ian K. Leonard, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  43. ^ Scot N. McCray, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  44. ^ Jeffrey L. Nash, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  45. ^ Carmen Rodriguez, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  46. ^ Board of Freeholders, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  47. ^ State of the County and Reorganization Meeting, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013. "Freeholder-Director Louis Cappelli, Jr. delivered the State of the County address as the Freeholder Board officially reorganized on Jan. 4 at 4:00 p.m. at the Camden County Courthouse. Newly elected Freeholder Michelle Gentek took the oath of office along with Ian Leonard and Jeffrey L. Nash to join their colleagues on the 2013 Freeholder Board."
  48. ^ County Clerk, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  49. ^ Sheriff, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  50. ^ Surrogate's Court, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  51. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Camden, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  52. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  53. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  54. ^ 2009 Governor: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  55. ^ 13 Non-Operating School Districts Eliminated, New Jersey Department of Education press release dated July 1, 2009. Accessed December 26, 2009.
  56. ^ Oaklyn Public School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 15, 2013. "Approximately 4,000 people reside in the town of Oaklyn. Right in the middle of Kendall Boulevard, you will find the Oaklyn Public School. Today, this historic little school building that was constructed in 1926 services approximately 450 pre-kindergarten through ninth grade students. Students residing in Oaklyn and Hi-Nella attend this school."
  57. ^ School Data for the Oaklyn Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed September 30, 2013.
  58. ^ Sterling High School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 15, 2013. "Sterling High School District is a regional district serving Hi Nella, Laurel Springs, Magnolia, Somerdale and Stratford."
  59. ^ Audi, Tamara. "Board Votes Hi-nella Into Regional District This Was A Key Step In Hi-nella's Longtime Effort To Send Its Students To Schools In Nearby Sterling.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, November 22, 1996. Accessed October 5, 2012. "It took only a few minutes last night for the Sterling school board to vote unanimously to accept Hi-Nella as a member of the regional district.... The vote makes use of a new law that could end Hi-Nella's five-year effort to release its dozen high school students from relatively distant Collingswood and Oaklyn schools in favor of Sterling, which is within walking distance of most Hi-Nella homes."

External links[edit]