Hide and Seek (2005 film)

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Hide and Seek
Hide and Seek 2005 movie.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed by John Polson
Produced by Barry Josephson
Written by Ari Schlossberg
Starring
Cinematography Dariusz Wolski
Edited by Jeffrey Ford
Distributed by 20th Century Fox
Release dates
January 27, 2005 (2005-01-27) (Argentina)
January 28, 2005 (2005-01-28)
Running time
101 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $25 million
Box office $122,650,962

Hide and Seek is a 2005 American horror film starring Robert De Niro, Famke Janssen and Dakota Fanning. It was directed by John Polson. The film opened in the United States in January 2005 and was a massive box office success. However it received mainly negative reviews, receiving a 13% on Rotten Tomatoes.[1]

Plot[edit]

Widowed psychologist Dr. David Callaway (Robert De Niro) and his daughter Emily (Dakota Fanning), with whom he shares a troubled relationship, move after Emily's mother, Allison (Amy Irving), apparently commits suicide. David meets local woman Elizabeth (Elisabeth Shue) and her niece, Amy, who is roughly the same age as Emily. Hoping to cultivate a new friendship for Emily, David sets up a play-date for her. The play-date is spoiled however when Emily cuts up the face of Amy's doll. Despite the unsuccessful play-date, David and Elizabeth hit it off, though Emily acts in a hostile manner towards her as well.

A family friend, Dr. Katherine Carson (Famke Janssen) - herself a fellow psychologist, visits David and Emily to try to help David and talks to Emily about her obsession with Charlie, her only new (and imaginary) friend. Later, Elizabeth visits again, hoping to make peace with Emily. When Emily says she is playing hide-and-seek with Charlie, Elizabeth indulges her by pretending to look for him. However, someone pushes Elizabeth out the window to her death. When David asks Emily who did it, once more she blames Charlie, admitting Charlie "made her help him". A distraught David, armed with a knife, goes outside, where he meets his neighbor. He assumes his neighbor is Charlie and cuts him with the knife, after which the suspicious neighbor calls the police.

Back in the house, David finds that, although he had seemingly been in his study many times, the boxes were actually never unpacked. David realizes that he has a split personality and that Charlie is not imaginary at all: Charlie in reality is David. Whenever it appeared David was in his study, Charlie was actually in control. David also realizes that under his Charlie personality, he murdered his wife and made it appear to be a suicide. He also fully recalls the events of the party the night before his wife's murder, where he had caught his wife cheating on him, which triggered David's identity disorder.

As Charlie, David goes on a murder spree. He viciously bludgeons the local sheriff with a shovel and drags his body to the cellar. Emily calls Katherine for help who arrives and is herself attacked by Charlie and thrown in the cellar with the sheriff. A terrified Emily manages to escape the house and knife-wielding Charlie seeking her out, and runs into the cave. Katherine takes the gun from the mortally wounded sheriff and follows Charlie to the cave. Charlie pretends to be David, admits he, not Emily, is sick, then proceeds to viciously attack Katherine. As Charlie threatens Emily, Katherine just manages to kill him.

Sometime later, Emily is preparing for school in her new life with Katherine. However, Emily's drawing of herself with Katherine has two heads, suggesting that she now also suffers from a split personality.


Main cast[edit]

Box office[edit]

US Gross Domestic Takings: US$ 51,100,486
+ Other International Takings: equivalent of $US71,544,334
= Gross Worldwide Takings: $US122,644,820

Reception[edit]

The film received poor reviews. It holds a 13% rating on Rotten Tomatoes.[2] BBC Movies gave the film two stars out of five, commenting that "Robert De Niro continues his long slide into mediocrity with yet another charmless psycho-thriller."[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]