Higgins project

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Higgins is an open source project dedicated to giving individuals more control over their personal identity, profile and social network data.

The project is organized into three main areas:

  1. Active Clients - An active client integrates with a browser and runs on a computer or mobile device.
    • Higgins 1.X: the active client supports the OASIS IMI protocol and performs the functions of an Information Card selector.
    • Higgins 2.0: the plan is to move beyond selector functionality to add support for managing passwords, Higgins relationship cards, as well other protocols such as OpenID. It also becomes a client for the Personal Data Store (see below) and thereby provides a kind of dashboard for personal information and a place to manage "permissioning"—deciding who gets access to what slice of the user's data.
  2. Personal Data Store (PDS) is a new work area under development for Higgins 2.0. A PDS stores local personal data, controls access to remotely hosted personal data, synchronizes personal data to other devices and computers, accessed directly or via a PDS client it allows the user to share selected aspects of their information with people and organizations that they trust.
  3. Identity Services - Code for (i) an IMI and SAML compatible Identity Provider and (ii) enabling websites to be IMI and OpenID compatible.

History[edit]

The initial code for the Higgins Project[1] was written by Paul Trevithick in the summer of 2003. In 2004 the effort became part of SocialPhysics.org, a collaboration between Paul and Mary Ruddy, of Azigo, (formerly Parity Communications, Inc.), and Meristic, and John Clippinger, at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society. Higgins, under its original name Eclipse Trust Framework, was accepted into the Eclipse Foundation in early 2005. Mary and Paul are the project co-leads. IBM and Novell's participation in the project was announced in early 2006.[2][3] Higgins has received technology contributions from IBM, Novell, Oracle, CA, Serena, Google, Corisecio as well as from several other firms and individuals. Version 1.0 was released in February 2008.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]