High Sheriff of Tipperary

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The High Sheriff of Tipperary was the Sovereign's judicial representative in County Tipperary. Initially an office for lifetime, assigned by the Sovereign, the High Sheriff became annually appointed from the Provisions of Oxford in 1258.[1] Besides his judicial importance, he had ceremonial and administrative functions and executed High Court Writs.[2]

History[edit]

The first (High) Shrievalties were established before the Norman Conquest in 1066 and date back to Saxon times.[3] In 1908, an Order in Council made the Lord-Lieutenant the Sovereign's prime representative in a county and reduced the High Sheriff's precedence.[4] Despite however that the office retained his responsibilities for the preservation of law and order in a county.[2]

In Tipperary and in four of the counties of the province of Connacht the office ceased to exist with the establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922.

English Interregnum, 1649–1660[edit]

Charles II, 1660–1685[edit]

  • 1660:
  • 1666: Thomas Sadleir of Sopwell hall[5]
  • 1672:
  • 1673:
  • 1674:
  • 1675: Richard Moore of Clonmel[5]
  • 1676:
  • 1684:

James II, 1685–1689[edit]

  • 1686: Anthony Maude[8]

William III, 1689–1702[edit]

  • 1689:
  • 1695:
  • 1696: Humphrey Minchin of Ballinakill[5]
  • 1697:
  • 1698: Thomas Moore of Chancellorstown[5]
  • 1701:

Anne, 1702–1714[edit]

  • 1702:
  • 1703: Kingsmill Pennefather of New Park[5]
  • 1707:
  • 1708: Kingsmill Pennefather of New Park[5] (2nd term)
  • 1709: Sir William Parsons, 2nd Bt[6]
  • 1712: Matthew Pennefather[5]
  • 1713:
  • Thomas Armstrong of Mealiffe[5]

George I, 1714–1727[edit]

  • 1714:
  • 1717: John Carleton of Darling Hill[9]
  • 1720:
  • 1721:
  • 1722: Guy Moore of Abbey[9]
  • 1723:
  • 1724: Richard Pennefather[5]
  • 1725:
  • 1726: William Baker of Lismacue[5]

George II, 1727–1760[edit]

  • 1727:
  • 1731: Lovelace Taylor of Noan and Ballinure[5]
  • 1732:
  • 1733: John Minchin of Annagh[5]
  • 1736: Paul Minchin of Balinakill[5]
  • 1738: William Armstrong of Farney Castle and Mount Heaton[9]
  • 1741: Sir Thomas Dancer, 4th Bt[10]
  • 1743:
  • 1744: Richard Moore of Barne[9]
  • 1745:
  • 1750: Kingsmill Pennefather[5]
  • 1753: John Bloomfield of Redwood[5]
  • 1757: Stephen Moore[9]
  • 1758:
  • 1759: John Bayly of Debsborough[9]

George III, 1760–1820[edit]

  • 1760:
  • 1764: William Barker[6]
  • 1765: Sir Thomas Maude, 2nd Bt[6]
  • 1768: Anthony Parker of Castle Lough[5]
  • 1770: Henry Prittie[11]
  • 1772: Peter Holmes of Peterfield[5]
  • 1777: Richard Biggs of Castle Biggs[5]
  • 1778:
  • 1779: Mark Lidwill of Clonmore, Cormackstown and Annfield[5]
  • 1780:
  • 1781: Robert Nicholson of Wilmar[12]
  • 1782: Richard Butler Hamilton Lowe of Lowe's Green[13]
  • 1783: James Ffogerty of Castle ffogerty[9]
  • 1784: Richard or Stephen Moore of Chancellor's Town[9][14]
  • 1785: Thomas Barton of Grove[15]
  • 1786: Stephen Moore[9]
  • 1789: Daniel Mansergh of Cashel[9]
  • 1790:
  • 1793: John Bagwell[16]

George IV, 1820–1830[edit]

  • 1825: William Barton of Grove, Fethard, Tipperary[20]
  • 1826: Mathew Pennefather of New Park[9]
  • 1827: Hon. George O'Callaghan[21]
  • 1828: William Perry of Woodrooff[22]
  • 1829: Matthew Jacob[23]

William IV, 1830–1837[edit]

  • 1830: John Trant[24]
  • 1831:
  • 1832: Stephen Moore[9]
  • 1833:

Victoria, 1837–1901[edit]

  • 1869: Richard Bagwell of Marlfield[5]
  • 1870: Vincent Scully of Mantle Hill[5]
  • 1871: Francis Wise Low of KIlshane[35]
  • 1872: William Bassett Holmes of St David's[5]
  • 1873: Andrew Carden[40]
  • 1873: James Fogarty of Castle Fogarty[42]
  • 1874: John Bayly of Debsborough[43]
  • 1875:
  • 1876: Anthony Parker[44]
  • 1877: Arthur John Moore of Mooresfort[45]
  • 1878: George Edward Ryan of Inch[5]
  • 1879: William Gibson[46]
  • 1880: Thomas Butler of Ballycarron[5]
  • 1881: Henry Jesse Lloyd of Lloydsborough[47]
  • 1882: Sir John Craven Carden, 5th Bt[48]
  • 1883: Hon. Henry O'Callaghan Prittie[49]
  • 1884: Benjamin Frend Going[40]
  • 1885: Stephen Moore of Barne[35]
  • 1886: Hon. Cosby Godolphin Trench of Sopwell Hall[46]
  • 1887: John Vivian Ryan-Lenigan of Castle ffogerty[5]
  • 1888: Andrew Murray Carden of Barnane[40]
  • 1889: FitzGibbon Trant[5]
  • 1890:
  • 1891: Charles Neville Clarke of Graiguenoe Park[5]
  • 1891: William Bassett Traherne Holmes of St David's[47]
  • 1892: James Netterville Atkinson of Ashley Park[5]
  • 1893: Austin Samuel Cooper[40]
  • 1894: John Bayly of Debsborough[5]
  • 1895: William Arthur Riall of Annerville[5]
  • 1896: Robert George Edward Twiss of Birdhill House[5]
  • 1897: Louis Henry Grubb[40]
  • 1898: Evelyn Fortescue Lloyd of Cranagh Castle[49]
  • 1899: William Godfrey Dunham Massy[5]
  • 1900: Edward Henry Saunders of Kilavalla[5]

Edward VII, 1901–1910[edit]

  • 1901: Charles Edward Tuthill[49]
  • 1902: Samuel Phillips of Gaile[5]
  • 1903: Richard Henry FitzRichard Falkiner[49]
  • 1904: Randal Kingsmill Moore of Barne[35]
  • 1905: Marcus Beresford Armstrong of Mealiffe[5]
  • 1906: Frederick Rhodes Armitage[40]
  • 1907: Walter Charles Butler-Stoney of Portland Park[5]
  • 1908: Standish Grady John Parker-Hutchinson of Timoney Park and Castle Lough, Tipperary[35]
  • 1909: Solomon Watson of Ballingarrane[5]
  • 1910: Charles Caleb Coote Webb of Kilmore, Nenagh[5]

George V, 1910–1922[edit]

  • 1911: Robert Joseph Cooke[5]
  • 1912: Hardress Gilbert Holmes[49]
  • 1913: Francis Simon Low[49]
  • 1914: Cavendish Walter Gartside-Tipping[49]
  • 1915: Charles Mayne Going[49]
  • 1916: Samuel Richard Grubb[49]
  • 1917: Darby Scully[49]
  • 1918: George Richard Cooke[49]
  • 1919: Richard Butler[50]
  • 1922:

Notes[edit]

† Died in office

References[edit]

  1. ^ John David Griffith Davies and Frederick Robert Worts (1928). England in the Middle Ages: Its Problems and Legacies. A. A. Knopf. p. 119. 
  2. ^ a b Alexander, George Glover (1915). The Administration of Justice in Criminal Matters (in England and Wales). The University Press. p. 89. 
  3. ^ Morris, William Alfred (1968). The Medieval English Sheriff to 1300. Manchester: Manchester University Press. p. 73. ISBN 0-7190-0342-3. 
  4. ^ Millward, Paul (2007). Civic Ceremonial: A Handbook, History and Guide for Mayors, Councillors and Officers. Shaw. p. 163. ISBN 0-7219-0164-6. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at Burke, Sir Bernhard (1912). Arthur Charles Fox-Davies, ed. A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry of Ireland. London: Harrison & Sons. 
  6. ^ a b c d Cokayne, George Edward (1904). The Complete Baronetage. vol. IV. Exeter: William Pollard and Co. Ltd. 
  7. ^ Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1,. p. 1202. 
  8. ^ Burke's Peerage 107th Edition Vol.2 p.1825
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Burke, John (1863). Sir Bernhard Burke, ed. Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland. vol. II. London: Harrison. 
  10. ^ Cokayne, George Edward (1903). The Complete Baronetage. vol. III. Exeter: William Pollard and Co. Ltd. p. 319. 
  11. ^ Burtchaell, George Dames (1888). Genealogical Memoirs of the Members of Parliament for the County and City of Kilkenny. Sealy, Bryers & Walker. p. 165. 
  12. ^ The London Gazette: no. 12158. p. 1. 30 January 1781. Retrieved 10 December 2012.
  13. ^ The London Gazette: no. 12273. p. 1. 23 February 1782. Retrieved 10 December 2012.
  14. ^ The London Gazette: no. 12525. p. 4. 6 March 1784. Retrieved 10 December 2012.
  15. ^ The London Gazette: no. 12628. p. 125. 12 March 1785. Retrieved 10 December 2012.
  16. ^ Thorne, R. G. (1986). The House of Commons, 1790–1820. vol. I. London: Secker & Warburg. p. 103. ISBN 0-436-52101-6. 
  17. ^ "Tipperary in the Year of the Rebellion 1798" William J Hayes, Lisheen Press 1998, p 20
  18. ^ Burke, John (1826). A General and Heraldic Dictionary of the Peerage and Baronetage of the United Kingdom. London: Henry Colburn. p. 118. 
  19. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Reports from Commissioners – Ireland. vol. XVII. The House of Commons. 1826. p. 113. 
  20. ^ "High Sheriffs, 1825". The Connaught Journal. 7 February 1825. Retrieved 10 August 2009. 
  21. ^ "High Sheriffs, 1827". The Kilkenny Independent. 24 February 1827. Retrieved 10 August 2009. 
  22. ^ "High Sheriffs, 1828". The Newry Commercial Telegraph. 11 March 1828. Retrieved 10 August 2009. 
  23. ^ Crossman, Virginia (1994). Local Government in Nineteenth-Century Ireland. Belfast: Ulster Society of Irish Historical Studies. p. 12. ISBN 0-85389-509-0. 
  24. ^ "National Library of Ireland – Trant Papers" (PDF). Retrieved 12 August 2008. 
  25. ^ Burke, John (1862). Sir Bernhard Burke, ed. Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland. vol. I. London: Harrison. 
  26. ^ Skey, William (1846). The Heraldic Calendar. Dublin: Alexander Thom. p. 48. 
  27. ^ "Darwin Correspondence Project – Letters". Retrieved 12 August 2009. 
  28. ^ Burke, John (1847). John Bernhard Burke, ed. Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry. vol. I. London: Henry Colburn. 
  29. ^ "High Sheriffs, 1845". The Armagh Guardian. 4 February 1845. Retrieved 10 August 2009. 
  30. ^ "Fellows of the Royal Society who are or were Freemasons, listed alphabetically". Retrieved 9 November 2012. 
  31. ^ Sylvanus, Urban (1849). The Gentleman's Magazine. part II. London: John Bowyer Nichols and Son. p. 424. 
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  33. ^ "High Sheriffs, 1850". Ballina Chronicle. 2 January 1850. Retrieved 10 August 2009. 
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  35. ^ a b c d e Fox-Davies, Arthur Charles (1929). Armorial Families. vol. II. London: Hurst & Blackett. 
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  39. ^ Burke, Bernard. A genealogical and heraldic history of the landed gentry of Great Britain and Ireland, Volume 2. p. 779.  Google Books
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  41. ^ Ruvigny, Marquis. The Plantagenet Roll of the Blood Royal:Mortimer-Percy. 
  42. ^ The London Gazette: no. 12422. p. 4. 11 March 1783. Retrieved 10 December 2012.
  43. ^ Walford, Edward (1909). The County Families of the United Kingdom. London: Spottiswoode & Co. Ltd. 
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  47. ^ a b A genealogical and heraldic history of the landed gentry of Ireland
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