Higher education in the Philippines

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Colleges and universities in the Philippines are generically called Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) by the Philippine Commission on Higher Education (CHED).

Classification[edit]

Most tertiary institutions, generically called higher education institutions by the Commission on Higher Education of the Philippines (CHED) are licensed, controlled, and supervised by CHED. Records from CHED showed that the country had 1,573 private institutions and 607 state-run colleges and universities, a total of 2,080 HEIs as of August 2010.[1]

Higher education institutions in the Philippines are either colleges or universities, and are generally classified as public or private.

Colleges are tertiary institutions that typically offer one or a few specialized courses, for example, in the sciences or in liberal arts, or in specific professional courses, such as Nursing, Computing, or Maritime Studies.

To be classified as universities, state universities and colleges (SUCs), CHED-supervised higher education institutions (CHEIs), private higher education institutions (PHEIs), and community colleges (CCs), must operate at least eight different degree programs. They must offer at least six undergraduate courses including a four-year course in liberal arts, a four-year course in Basic Science Mathematics, a four-year course in the Social Sciences, a minimum of three other active and recognized professional courses leading to government licensures, and at least two graduate-level courses leading to doctoral degrees. A further seven areas of requirements as universities are mandated by the Commission on Higher Education.[2] Local government universities and colleges (LUCs) have less stringent requirements than private universities. They are required to operate at least five undergraduate programs (as opposed to eight for private universities), and two graduate-level programs.[3]

Public tertiary education[edit]

Public universities are all non-sectarian entities, and are further classified as State University and College (SUC) or Local College and University (LCU).[4] SUCs are fully funded by the national government as determined by the Philippine Congress. The University of the Philippines, being the "national university",[5][6] receives the biggest chunk of the budget among the 456 state colleges and universities. LCUs, on the other hand, are run by local government units.[7] The Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila is first and largest among the LCUs.[8][9]

LCUs appeared to be having some political difficulties. On 1 March 2011, the education committee of the Philippine Senate announced that it will push for a law regulating local colleges and universities (LCUs) all over the country. The senate hearing received evidence from CHED that only a few of the courses offered in LCU institutions have permits from the national government. Attorney Lily Milla of the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) gave evidence to the hearing that out of 450 degree programs offered by the country's 93 LCUs, around 42 have permits to operate. Senate education committee chairman, Senator Edgardo Angara, told the same hearing that without a law regulating LCUs, "We will add to the number of diploma mills. We already have enough mills. Many of the poor send their kids to those schools and they're being shortchanged right now".[10]

Private tertiary institutions[edit]

Private colleges and universities may either be "sectarian" or "non-sectarian" entities. Institutions may either be "not-for-profit" or "profit-oriented". Most private schools are not-for-profit Catholic like Adamson University (Vincentian), the Ateneo de Manila University (Jesuit), De La Salle University (Christian Brothers), Don Bosco Technical College (Salesian), Notre Dame of Dadiangas University (Marist Brothers of the Schools), Saint Louis University, Baguio City (CICM), San Beda College (Benedictine), University of San Agustin (Augustinian), University of San Carlos, and the Divine Word College of Vigan (SVD), and the University of Santo Tomas and Colegio de San Juan de Letran (Dominican). However, there are also non-Catholic not-for-profit sectarian institutions such as Silliman University (Presbyterian), Adventist University of the Philippines Seventh-day Adentists), Wesleyan University Philippines (Methodist), Central Philippine University (Baptist), Philippine Christian University (Methodist), Trinity University of Asia (Episcopalian), and New Era University (Iglesia ni Cristo). Non-sectarian private schools, on the other hand, are corporations licensed by the Securities and Exchange Commission. Centro Escolar University, Far Eastern University, and STI College are registered on the Philippine Stock Exchange.

Accreditation[edit]

Accreditation is a process for assessing and upgrading the educational quality of higher education institutions and programs through self-evaluation and peer judgment.[11] It is a system of evaluation based on the standards of an accrediting agency, and a means of assuring and improving the quality of education.[12] The process leads to a grant of accredited status by an accrediting agency and provides public recognition and information on educational quality.[11]

Accreditation of Private institutions[edit]

Voluntary accreditation of all higher education institutions is subject to the policies of the Commission on Higher Education. Voluntary accrediting agencies in the private sector are the Philippine Accrediting Association of Schools, Colleges and Universities (PAASCU), the Philippine Association of Colleges and Universities' Commission on Accreditation (PACUCOA), and the Association of Christian Schools, Colleges and Universities Accrediting Association Inc. (ACSCU-AAI) which all operate under the umbrella of the Federation of Accrediting Agencies of the Philippines (FAAP), which itself is the certifying agency authorized by CHED.[13][14] Accreditation can be either of programs or of institutions.

All of the institutions accredited by these three agencies certified by FAAP are private institutions. Under CHED's Revised Policies and Guidelines on Voluntary Accreditation in Aid of Quality and Excellence and Higher Education, there are four levels of program accreditation, with Level IV being the highest.[11][15]

Two institutions, Ateneo de Manila University and De La Salle University-Manila were granted Level IV accreditation pursuant to the provisions of CHED Order, CMO 31 of 1995, but their Level IV institutional accreditation lapsed. Ateneo was granted Level IV re-accreditation in 2011.[16]

At present, nine universities have current institutional accreditation. Institutional accreditation is the highest certification that can be given to an educational institution after a consideration of the university's number of individual program accreditations and the result of an overall evaluation of the quality of its facilities, services and faculty. These schools are Adventist University of the Philippines, Ateneo de Manila University,[16] Ateneo de Davao University, Ateneo de Naga University, Centro Escolar University, De La Salle University – Dasmariñas, Silliman University, Trinity University of Asia, and University of Santo Tomas.[17]

At present the Ateneo de Manila University, is the only university in the Philippines that has been simultaneously granted both Level IV Status and institutional accreditation. Silliman University on the other hand is recorded to have the highest number of accredited programs in the country, fourteen of which are on Level IV accreditation status while simultaneously bearing Institutional Accreditation by the Federation of Accrediting Agencies of the Philippines.[18][19]

Accreditation for Public Institutions[edit]

Accrediting agencies for government-supported institutions are the Accrediting Association of Chartered Colleges and Universities of the Philippines (AACCUP), and the Association of Local Colleges and Universities Commission On Accreditation (ALCUCOA). Together they formed the National Network of Quality Assurance Agencies (NNQAA) as the certifying agency for government-sponsored institutions. However NNQAA does not certify all government-sponsored institutions.

The Technical Vocational Education Accrediting Agency of the Philippines (TVEAAP) was established and registered with the Securities Exchange Commission on 27 October 1987. On 28 July 2003, the FAAP board accepted the application of TVEAAP to affiliate with FAAP.[20]

AACCUP and PAASCU[21] are active members of the International Network of Quality Assurance Agencies for Higher Education (INQAAHE), and the Asia Pacific Quality Network (APQN).[13]

Autonomy and Deregulation[edit]

In an effort to rationalize its supervision of institutions of higher learning, CHED has also prescribed guidelines for granting privileges of autonomy and deregulation to certain schools. According to the guidelines, the general criteria examined by CHED are an institution's "long tradition of integrity and untarnished reputation", "commitment to excellence", and "sustainability and viability of operations".[22]

Autonomous status[edit]

Autonomous status allows universities to design their own curricula, offer new programs and put up branches or satellite campuses without having to secure permits, confer honorary degrees, and carry out operations without much interference from CHED.[23] Aside from all host state colleges and universities and other chartered public universities, such as University of the Philippines, Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila,[24] Mindanao State University and Polytechnic University of the Philippines,[25][26] Forty six private higher education institutions have been granted autonomous status such as the Ateneo de Manila University, New Era University, Lyceum of the Philippines University, St. Paul University Philippines Tuguegarao City, Central Philippine University, De La Salle University, De La Salle University-Dasmariñas, Silliman University, Saint Louis University, Baguio City, Baliuag University, University of Perpetual Help System-Laguna and University of Perpetual Help-Dr. Jose G. Tammayo Medical University, University of Santo Tomas, St. Paul University Dumaguete, Far Eastern University,[27] Adventist University of the Philippines, Adamson University, University of the East, Our Lady of Fatima University, Centro Escolar University, University of the Visayas,[citation needed], Trinity University of Asia, Technological Institute of the Philippines, and The Philippine Women's University System.

CHED regularly updates its list of autonomous institutions[28] with the latest published list valid to 6 October 2009. Recently University of Perpetual Help System Laguna and University of Perpetual Help - Dr. Jose G. Tamayo Medical University. Both in Biñan, Laguna received its Autonomous Status effective from July 25, 2012.

Deregulated status[edit]

Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) with deregulated status enjoy the same privilege as autonomous HEIs, but they must still secure permits for new programs and campuses.[23]

CHED regularly updates its list of autonomous institutions [28] with the latest published list valid to 6 October 2009. As at that date 15 deregulated HEIs were listed by CHED.

Rankings and league tables[edit]

Local rankings[edit]

There are no set methods for ranking institutions in the Philippines. Aside from comparisons in terms of accreditation, autonomy, and centers of excellence awarded by the Commission on Higher Education (CHED), there are attempts to rank schools based on performance in board exams conducted by the Professional Regulation Commission (PRC). The PRC and CHED sometimes publish reports on these results.

In 2009, CHED executive director Julito Vitriolo said that they are in the process of establishing appropriate guidelines to rank Philippine universities and colleges for each specific academic program or discipline.[29]

International rankings[edit]

Internationally, the Ateneo de Manila University, De La Salle University, the University of the Philippines, and the University of Santo Tomas are those that had been regularly listed as among the region and world's top universities in league tables and surveys such as in the now-defunct Asiaweek university rankings (which last ranked universities in 1999 and 2000),[30][31] and the THES-QS World University Rankings in 2005, 2006, and 2008.[32] In the 2007 THES-QS rankings, only UP and the Ateneo remained in the THES-QS rankings' top 500.[33] In 2008, Ateneo, La Salle, UP, and UST once again placed in the rankings, with the Ateneo ranked 254th in the world, UP at 276th while De La Salle University and the University of Santo Tomas both placed in the Top 401-500 category[34] Ateneo and UP were also ranked among the top 100 universities worldwide in the field of the arts and humanities.[35] The THES-QS rankings are mainly based on peer review survey,[36] while the Asiaweek rankings were measured on the university's endowment and resources.[37] In the 2009 world rankings, two Philippine universities made it to the top 300, with the Ateneo de Manila University ranked 234th and the University of the Philippines ranked 262nd. De La Salle University was ranked within the 401-500 range, whereas the University of Santo Tomas was ranked below 500.[38] Individual subject areas were also ranked in the following categories: Arts and Humanities, Engineering/Technology, Natural Sciences, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, and Social Sciences. The Ateneo and UP ranked 88th and 93rd, respectively, in Arts and Humanities,[39] 243rd and 281st, respectively, in Engineering/Technology,[40] 114th and 176th, respectively, in Natural Sciences,[41] 186th and 171st, respectively, in Life Sciences & Biomedicine,[42] and 138th and 123rd, respectively, in Social Sciences, where La Salle was ranked 292nd.[43]

There are other university rankings based on different methodologies and criteria. In the Webometrics Ranking of World Universities by a Spanish research body, which measures a university’s Internet presence and the volume of research output freely accessible online, has UP and La Salle ranked ahead of other local universities. On the other hand, in the Shanghai Jiao Tong University Academic Ranking of World Universities, which is based on Nobel Prize winners, Fields medals for mathematicians, highly cited researchers, or articles in Nature or Science; and, the École des Mines de Paris rankings, which is according to the number of alumni who are the CEOs of the Fortune 500 companies, do not have Philippine universities in the top 500.[23]

In the QS 2009 top Asian universities rankings, 16 Philippine schools participated or have been included in the survey. These schools were: Adamson University, the Ateneo de Davao University, the Ateneo de Manila University, Central Mindanao University, De La Salle University, Father Saturnino Urios University, the Mapua Institute of Technology, Mindanao State University, the Polytechnic University of the Philippines, St. Louis University, Silliman University, the University of the Philippines, the University of San Carlos, the University of Santo Tomas, the University of Southeastern Philippines, and Xavier University.[44]

Unlike the THE-QS world university rankings, the QS 2009 Asian University Rankings is limited in scope to Asian institutions, surveys only parties in Asia,[45] and utilizes different criteria compared to those used in the THE-QS rankings.[46] Given these criteria, four Philippine schools ranked among the top 200: the University of the Philippines (63rd), De La Salle University (76th), Ateneo de Manila University (84th) and the University of Santo Tomas (104th). In the subject areas, four Philippine universities figured in the region's top 100: For Arts and Humanities, the University of the Philippines (12th), the Ateneo de Manila University (19th), De La Salle University (44th), and the University of Santo Tomas (55th) were recognized.[47] For Life Sciences and Biomedicine, the University of the Philippines (47th), the Ateneo de Manila University (52nd), De La Salle University (79th), and the University of Santo Tomas (85th) were recognized.[48] For Natural Sciences, the Ateneo de Manila University (24th),the University of the Philippines (32nd), the University of Santo Tomas (94th), and De La Salle University (97th) were recognized.[49] For Social Sciences, the University of the Philippines (22nd), the Ateneo de Manila University (28th), De La Salle University (51st), and the University of Santo Tomas (75th) were recognized.[50] For IT and Engineering, the University of the Philippines (63rd), the Ateneo de Manila University (64th), and De La Salle University (79th) were recognized.[51] For other indicators, Philippine schools made it to the top 100 in all but three of the ranking criteria (student-faculty ratio, papers per faculty, and citations per paper).

In the same 2009 QS Asian University Ranking, more Philippine universities were included in the top 500 bracket. In terms International Student Review: Ateneo de Manila University (70th), De La Salle University (76th), Silliman University (111th), University of Santo Tomas (183rd), Saint Louis University (216th), University of San Carlos (250th), Mapua Institute of Technology (267th), University of the Philippines (281st), Polytechnic University of the Philippines (345th), Fr. Saturnino Urios University (368th).[52]

In terms of International Faculty Review, the rankings were as follows: Ateneo de Manila University (73rd), University of the Philippines (151st), Silliman University (216th), De La Salle University (283rd), Saint Louis University (288th), University of Santo Tomas (321st), while Fr. Saturnino University, Mapua Institute of Technology, Polytechnic University of the Philippines and the University of San Carlos tied at the 324th spot.[53]

In 2010, the universities above were included in the QS Asian Universities Survey. Overall, the Ateneo de Manila University (58th), the University of the Philippines (78th), the University of Santo Tomas (101st), and De La Salle University (106th) were ranked among the top 100 in Asia. In the various subject areas, the four universities were among the Asian top 100. For Arts and Humanities, the Ateneo de Manila University (14th), the University of the Philippines (16th), De La Salle University (54th), and the University of Santo Tomas (69th) were recognized.[54] For Life Sciences and Biomedicine, the University of the Philippines (32nd), the Ateneo de Manila University (38th), the University of Santo Tomas (69th), and De La Salle University (84th) were recognized.[55] For Natural Sciences, the Ateneo de Manila University (22nd), the University of the Philippines (31st), and De La Salle University (88th) were recognized.[56] For Social Sciences, the University of the Philippines (18th), the Ateneo de Manila University (25th), De La Salle University (48th), and the University of Santo Tomas (83rd) were recognized.[57] For IT and Engineering, the Ateneo de Manila University (57th), the University of the Philippines (62nd), and De La Salle University (80th) were recognized.[58]

In the other academic criteria, Philippine universities were represented in all but two indicators (international student review and international faculty review). For Academic Peer Review, the University of the Philippines and Ateneo de Manila University posted the same scores (96.0), and were ranked 23rd and 24th, respectively. De La Salle University and the University of Santo Tomas were ranked 70th and 90th, respectively.[59] For Asian recruiter review, the University of the Philippines (22nd), the Ateneo de Manila University (25th), De La Salle University (29th), and the University of Santo Tomas (59th) were recognized.[60] For Student-Faculty ratio, the University of Southeastern Philippines was the only Philippine school recognized, at 43rd.[61] For citations per paper, the University of Santo Tomas was ranked 8th, the only Philippine school recognized in that category.[62] For International Student Exchange-Inbound, the Ateneo de Manila University (48th) and University of San Carlos (53rd) were recognized.[63] For International Student Exchange-Outbound, the Ateneo de Manila University was the only Philippine school recognized, ranking 41st.[64]

Quacquarelli Symonds Asian Rankings 2013[65]

  1. University of the Philippines 67th
  2. Ateneo de Manila University 109th
  3. University of Santo Tomas 150th
  4. De La Salle University 151st-160th
  5. University of Southeastern Philippines 251-300th

Quacquarelli Symonds Asian Rankings 2014[66]

  1. University of the Philippines 63rd
  2. Ateneo de Manila University 115th
  3. University of Santo Tomas 141st
  4. De La Salle University 151st-160th
  5. Ateneo de Davao University 251-300th

Views of the THES-QS rankings[edit]

Rankings such as the THES-QS have been received with mixed reactions. In 2006, Ang Pamantasan, the official student paper of Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila, published the university's criticism on the rankings, saying that the THES-QS criteria do not apply to the unique landscape of each participating universities, and that such rankings say nothing or very little about whether students are actually learning at particular colleges or universities.[67] On the same year, the University of the Philippines, through its University President Emerlinda Román, expressed that it does not want to participate in the THES-QS Ranking, but was included in 2007 with an incomplete academic profile.[68] That same year, Ateneo de Manila University President Fr. Bienvenido Nebres, S.J. commented on the rankings, pointing out that rankings such as these did not adequately reflect the university's progress or how well it has been working toward achieving its mission-vision.[69]

In 2007, the Ateneo administration reiterated its position on several occasions,[70] even given an improvement in the 2007 rankings.[71]

In 2008, the University of the Philippines questioned the validity of the 2008 THES-QS rankings, claiming that the methodology used was "problematic", and cited the International Ranking Systems for Universities and Institutions: A Critical Appraisal, which found out that the Times simply asks 190,000 ‘experts’ to list what they regard as the top 30 universities in their field of expertise without providing input data on any performance indicators, as one of the bases for rejecting the said survey.[72] Furthermore, the UP said that THES-QS refused to divulge how and where the data were taken from,[73] and instead, advised the university to advertise at the THES-QS website for US$ 48,930 publicity package.[72] CHED Chairperson Emmanuel Angeles, on the other hand, commended all four Philippine universities that made it to the list. He also suggested that Philippine schools would get better in the future THES-QS rankings if they choose to advertise in the THES-QS publications and when budgetary allocations for faculty and researchers, particularly at UP, would become better in the coming years.[73] The Ateneo administration, instead of directly commenting on the 2008 rankings, allowed the publication of an opinion-editorial article on its website, which basically reiterated the same position, even after further improvement.[74]

In 2009, the University of Santo Tomas expressed that "it will be very difficult for a university to rank high in such surveys unless they enjoy big media mileage or they have extensive press releases to advertise themselves". Furthermore, UST lamented that, "it is quite puzzling that another university in the country ranked much higher than UST in the field of Life Sciences and Biomedicine when it hardly offers any course in the field like Pharmacy, Medical Technology, Nursing, Physical and Occupational Therapy". Despite repeated invitations to participate in conference sponsored by the THES-QS and to advertise the University in its websites and publications, UST strongly refused to do so.[75] The Ateneo administration maintained its previous positions following the 2009 rankings, however actively participates in the survey.[76]

In 2010, following publication of the 2010 QS Asian University Rankings, there were varied responses. The Ateneo administration maintained its previous positions, and together with some faculty members, expressed some satisfaction with the rankings, but committed to continue work on improving the university.[77] In the University of Santo Tomas, some administrators noted their performance vis-a-vis other schools in terms of academic peer review,[78] while the editorial of their student paper noted that some things were amiss with the rankings, noting their university's performance in local board examinations and the marketing and advertising aspect of the rankings.[79]

See also[edit]

Categories[edit]

References[edit]

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  2. ^ CHED Memorandum Order 1996/48 S.2
  3. ^ CHED Memorandum Order 2006/32 Art.VII S.10
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  5. ^ About UP, University of the Philippines System website. Accessed April 27, 2007.
  6. ^ Republic Act 9500 An Act to Strengthen the University of the Philippines as the National University. Retrieved May 20, 2008.
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  8. ^ "Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila Pamantasan 41st Founding Anniversary". Manila Bulletin. 2006-06-19. Archived from the original on 2006-06-19. Retrieved 2006-12-25. 
  9. ^ PLM ALCU.
  10. ^ Christopher Beresford Gain, Needs Analysis, Problem Assessment, and Resources Inventory: Towards the Establishment of a Community College p50, Trinity University of Asia, Quezon City, Philippines, March 2011, Doctor of Education dissertation.
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  13. ^ a b A new era for higher education accreditation in RP. Accessed August 19, 2008.
  14. ^ Palispis, E. (1999) Voluntary Accreditation in the Philippines: An Overview. Asian Social Institute, Manila. p10
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  16. ^ a b http://ls.ateneo.edu/module.php?LM=articles.detail&eid=1306199966786
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  18. ^ "14 Academic Programs Granted Highest Accreditation Status". Silliman University. Retrieved 2012-04-22.
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  20. ^ Nilo E Colinares, Philippine Education in the Third Millennium, 6Ns Enterprises, Manila, 2005, p283
  21. ^ http://www.dlsu.edu.ph/offices/iaa/paascu2006primer.asp
  22. ^ CHED Memorandum Order No. 52, Series of 2006. Last accessed 30 October 2008.
  23. ^ a b c RP universities get low rankings; La Salle, UST dropped out of Top 500. GMANews.TV
  24. ^ PLM FAQs.
  25. ^ Chartered Colleges and Universities.
  26. ^ CMO No.18, series of 1999
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  32. ^ THES-QS World University Rankings.
  33. ^ Ateneo de Manila University officials react to 2007 THES results. Last accessed 13 October 2008.
  34. ^ 2008 THES-QS Rankings. Last accessed 13 October 2008.
  35. ^ 2008 THES-QS Rankings in Arts & Humanities. Last accessed 13 October 2008.
  36. ^ THES-QS: Methodology.
  37. ^ Asiaweek: Overall rankings.
  38. ^ THE-QS 2009 World University Rankings.
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  41. ^ [5]
  42. ^ [6]
  43. ^ [7]
  44. ^ List of schools
  45. ^ QS Asian University Rankings Overview
  46. ^ QS vs. THE-QS rankings
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  48. ^ [9]
  49. ^ [10]
  50. ^ [11]
  51. ^ [12]
  52. ^ "QS Asian University Rankings: International Student Review". QS Quacquarelli Symonds. Retrieved 2010-06-25.
  53. ^ "QS Asian University Rankings: International Faculty Review". QS Quacquarelli Symonds. Retrieved 2010-06-25.
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  56. ^ [15]
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  59. ^ [18]
  60. ^ [19]
  61. ^ [20]
  62. ^ [21]
  63. ^ [22]
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  65. ^ [24]
  66. ^ [25]
  67. ^ "PLM administration criticizes the THES-QS Survey". Ang Pamantasan, Vol. XXVII No. 2. September 01, 2006.
  68. ^ Leticia Peñano-Ho, Who Should Tell Us Who We Are?, University of the Philippines System website. Accessed May 6, 2007.
  69. ^ http://www.ateneo.edu/index.php?p=120&type=2&aid=2989
  70. ^ http://www.ateneo.edu/index.php?p=120&type=2&aid=3272
  71. ^ http://www.ateneo.edu/index.php?p=120&type=2&aid=4489
  72. ^ a b UP Questions Validity of the THES and QS university rankings. October 28, 2008.
  73. ^ a b CHED hails rankings of 4 RP universities. Philippine Daily Inquirer. October 16, 2008.
  74. ^ http://www.ateneo.edu/index.php?p=120&type=2&aid=5951
  75. ^ UST 144 in Asian Rankings says new survey.
  76. ^ http://www.ateneo.edu/index.php?p=120&type=2&aid=7542
  77. ^ http://www.theguidon.com/?p=4508
  78. ^ http://www.varsitarian.net/news/20100618/ust_ranks_101st_in_asia
  79. ^ http://www.varsitarian.net/editorial_opinion/editorial/20100618/some_things_amiss_with_top_200_list