Highland Park Village

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Highland Park Village
Highland Park Village 1.jpg
Highland Park Village during the Christmas Season
Location Highland Park in Dallas County, Texas,  United States
Opening date 1931
Developer Flippen-Prather Realty, Inc.
Management HP Village Partners, LP
Owner HP Village Partners, LP
Architect Fooshee & Cheek
No. of stores and services 101
Total retail floor area 200,000 square feet (19,000 m2)[1]
No. of floors 1
Parking 1,106
Website http://www.hpvillage.com/
Highland Park Shopping Village
Location Jct. of Preston Rd. and Mockingbird Ln., Highland Park, Texas
Area 10 acres (40,000 m2)[2]
Built 1931
Architect multiple
Architectural style Mission/spanish Revival, Colonial Revival
Governing body Private
NRHP Reference # 97001393
Significant dates
Added to NRHP November 17, 1997[3]
Designated NHL February 16, 2000[4]

Highland Park Village is an upscale shopping mall located at the southwest corner of Mockingbird Lane and Preston Road in Highland Park, Texas (USA) and was the first self-contained shopping center in America. The Highland Park Village was declared a National Historic Landmark in 2000.[2][4]

History[edit]

Mr. Flippen and Mr. Hugh Prather Jr. decided that Highland Park needed a shopping center that could function as a town square, the developers traveled to Barcelona and Seville, Spain as well as to Mexico and California, studying the architecture in order to plan a retail center for Highland Park.

They hired American architects Marion Fresenius Fooshee and James B. Cheek to design the center, which opened in 1931. After the death of Hugh Prather, Sr. in 1959, management of the Village was taken over by his sons, John Prather and Hugh Prather, Jr. In 1966, the Howard Corporation acquired the shopping center. Under its management, little attention was given to proper tenant mix, landscaping deteriorated, overhead wires began to criss-cross the property, inappropriate signage appeared, and tenants were permitted to make facade alterations that were not in keeping with the classical architecture of the Village. The distinctive Spanish arches were covered up and newer materials that did not blend with the basic stone and stucco began to appear.

In 1976, the Howard Corporation decided to sell the Village and enlisted the help of the Henry S. Miller Company. Henry S. Miller, Jr. became attracted to the Village’s unrealized potential. Mr. Miller had a sentimental attachment to the property because his father had been an associate of the Flippen-Prather Realty Company from 1917 to 1919 and a close personal friend of both partners, Hugh Prather and Edgar Flippen.

Henry S. Miller and partners acquired the property in 1976 for $5 million and was developed by the Henry S. Miller Company, which later became Henry S. Miller Interests.[1] Under Henry S. Miller, the sleepy shopping center quickly turned into a luxury shopping destination that became known for harboring the most premiere designer shops in North Texas. Lesser known, local stores were replaced with Ralph Lauren and the state's first Chanel.

On February 16, 2000, the shopping center was recognized as a National Historic Landmark and the center was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on November 17, 1997.[5]

In 2009, Highland Park Village was purchased by Stephen Summers, Elisa Summers, Heather Washburne, and Ray Washburne for a record $170 million, the highest total price for a retail property of that year.[6] While retail in other parts of the country was hit hard by the recession, Highland Park Village managed to stay strong with the opening of Vince, a contemporary sportswear label and Leggiadro, a Manhattan-based luxury Italian store. The new owners replaced the former Banana Republic space with Texas' only Christian Louboutin and Diane Von Furstenberg.

2013 saw the opening of Christian Dior, Tom Ford, and Alexander McQueen, Brunello Cucinelli, Ermenegildo Zegna, James Perse, as well as a new Saint Laurent Paris.[7]

2014 has already brought luxury French brand Balenciaga to the center, and with the news of the Tom Thumb and Williams Sonoma closing in the center, many speculate a massive retail overhaul with multiple new boutiques for brands in search of stores in the area.

Currently the Village commands about $125 per square foot; placing it among the priciest retail locales in the state, although inexpensive relative to luxury retail areas in larger markets New York City, Los Angeles, and Chicago.[8] Located near the wealthiest neighborhoods in the region, with Texas' first country club right next door, sales in Highland Park Village range from $1,000 per square foot to more than $1,500 annually.[9]

Shops[edit]

Highland Park Village 2.jpg

The center boasts several exclusive, luxury stores in the Texas market, including: Akris, Alexander McQueen, Brunello Cucinelli, Carolina Herrera, Christian Dior, Christian Louboutin, Diane von Fürstenberg, Escada, Harry Winston, Leggiadro, Loro Piana, Madison, Rag & Bone, Scoop NYC, Stella McCartney, Tom Ford, Trina Turk, Vince Anne Fontaine, Chanel, Hermes, Jimmy Choo, Lela Rose, Saint Laurent Paris, and St. John (clothing).

The Village also has a handful of dining options ranging from cafes and bistros to cheese and spirit shops.

The Village Theater, Texas' first luxury theater, is also found at Highland Park Village. When it first opened in 1935 its construction cost more than $100,000, which is over $1,700,000 inflation adjusted[10] and at the time was considered an astronomical amount. In 1987, the theater was renovated and the screens were moved upstairs to create 11,000 square feet (1,000 m2) in retail space. It was once again renovated in 2010.[11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Highland Park Village Facts Sheet. Retrieved 20 February 2007.
  2. ^ a b W. Dwayne Jones, Susan Allen Kline, Carolyn Pitts, Patty Henry, and Beth Savage (February, 1999). National Register of Historic Places Inventory-Nomination: Highland Park Shopping Village / Highland Park Village PDF (32 KB). National Park Service.  and Accompanying 14 photos, from 1998 PDF (32 KB)
  3. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2007-01-23. 
  4. ^ a b "Highland Park Shopping Village". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. Retrieved 2008-03-30. 
  5. ^ Dallas Convention & Visitors Bureau - Listing: Highland Park Village. Retrieved 9 September 2006.
  6. ^ "New Owners Plan Changes at Highland Park Village". Retrieved 2010-03-26. 
  7. ^ "Christian Dior, Yves Saint Laurent, Alexander McQueen to open in Highland Park Village". 
  8. ^ http://nreionline.com/retail/9-most-expensive-retail-streets-us#slide-6-field_images-268411
  9. ^ Hethcock, Bill (2010-02-28). "New tenants on tap at Highland Park Village". Retrieved 2010-03-26. 
  10. ^ http://www.bls.gov/data/inflation_calculator.htm
  11. ^ "Legacy". Retrieved 2010-03-26. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 32°50′9″N 96°48′20″W / 32.83583°N 96.80556°W / 32.83583; -96.80556