Highly erodible land

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In United States agricultural policy, Highly erodible land (HEL) refers to land that is very susceptible to erosion, including fields that have at least 1/3 or 50 acres (200,000 m2) of soils with a natural erosion potential of at least 8 times their T value.[1] About 101 million acres (410,000 km2) of cropland meet this definition of HEL, according to the 1997 National Resources Inventory.[2] Farms cropping highly erodible land and under production flexibility contracts must be in compliance with a conservation plan that protects this cropland.[3]

  1. ^ "7 C.F.R. Subpart B—Highly Erodible Land Conservation Title 7 - Agriculture". Justia.com. Retrieved 17 July 2011. 
  2. ^ "Soil Erosion". United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 17 July 2011. 
  3. ^ "Farm and Commodity Policy: Glossary". United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 17 July 2011.