Hillsborough Township, New Jersey

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Hillsborough Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Hillsborough
Map highlighting Hillsborough Township's location within Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County in New Jersey.
Map highlighting Hillsborough Township's location within Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Hillsborough Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hillsborough Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°29′52″N 74°40′14″W / 40.497692°N 74.670505°W / 40.497692; -74.670505Coordinates: 40°29′52″N 74°40′14″W / 40.497692°N 74.670505°W / 40.497692; -74.670505[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Somerset
Royal charter September 12, 1771
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Government[5]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Doug Tomson (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Administrator Anthony Ferrera[4]
 • Clerk Pamela Borek[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 55.001 sq mi (142.453 km2)
 • Land 54.536 sq mi (141.248 km2)
 • Water 0.465 sq mi (1.204 km2)  0.85%
Area rank 29th of 566 in state
1st of 21 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 108 ft (33 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 38,303
 • Estimate (2013)[10] 39,299
 • Rank 59th of 566 in state
3rd of 21 in county[11]
 • Density 702.3/sq mi (271.2/km2)
 • Density rank 413th of 566 in state
15th of 21 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08844[12][13]
Area code(s) 732 and 908[14]
FIPS code 3403531890[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0882169[17][2]
Website hillsborough-nj.org

Hillsborough Township is a township in Somerset County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 38,303,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 1,669 (+4.6%) from the 36,634 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 7,826 (+27.2%) from the 28,808 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Hillsborough Township was originally created by Royal charter on September 12, 1771, from portions of Western precinct. It was incorporated by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798, as one of New Jersey's original group of 104 townships. Portions of the township were taken to form the boroughs of Millstone (May 14, 1894) and Manville (April 1, 1929).[19][20]

Geography[edit]

Hillsborough Township is located at 40°29′52″N 74°40′14″W / 40.497692°N 74.670505°W / 40.497692; -74.670505 (40.497692, −74.670505). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 55.001 square miles (142.453 km2), of which, 54.536 square miles (141.248 km2) of it is land and 0.465 square miles (1.204 km2) of it (0.85%) is water.[2][1]

Communities[edit]

Unincorporated communities located within Hillsborough Township include Belle Mead, Blackwells Mills, Champlain, Clover Mill, Flagtown, Frankfort, Hamilton, Higgins Mills, Montgomery, Neshanic, Pleasant View, Royce Field, Royce Valley, South Branch and Woods Tavern..[21]

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Hillsborough Township, New Jersey
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 74
(23)
76
(24)
86
(30)
94
(34)
99
(37)
101
(38)
104
(40)
105
(41)
105
(41)
92
(33)
84
(29)
73
(23)
105
(41)
Average high °F (°C) 38
(3)
41
(5)
50
(10)
61
(16)
72
(22)
80
(27)
85
(29)
83
(28)
76
(24)
64
(18)
54
(12)
42
(6)
62.2
(16.7)
Average low °F (°C) 18
(−8)
20
(−7)
27
(−3)
36
(2)
46
(8)
56
(13)
61
(16)
60
(16)
52
(11)
40
(4)
31
(−1)
23
(−5)
39.2
(3.8)
Record low °F (°C) −16
(−27)
−12
(−24)
−1
(−18)
16
(−9)
26
(−3)
34
(1)
44
(7)
38
(3)
29
(−2)
12
(−11)
5
(−15)
−10
(−23)
−16
(−27)
Precipitation inches (mm) 3.59
(91.2)
2.84
(72.1)
3.94
(100.1)
4.09
(103.9)
4.33
(110)
4.35
(110.5)
4.83
(122.7)
3.98
(101.1)
4.26
(108.2)
4.21
(106.9)
3.59
(91.2)
3.84
(97.5)
47.85
(1,215.4)
Source: [22]

Redevelopment[edit]

After the three and three quarter mile U.S. Route 206 Bypass is completed, the town plans to design a town center along the old Business Route 206.[23] Construction for the bypass began in 2010 and is expected be completed by 2017, with the old section of US-206 intended to become "main street" for the township and be zoned for commercial and residential use.[24]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1790 2,201
1810 2,456
1820 2,885 17.5%
1830 2,878 −0.2%
1840 2,863 −0.5%
1850 3,409 19.1%
1860 3,488 2.3%
1870 3,443 −1.3%
1880 3,248 −5.7%
1890 2,825 −13.0%
1900 2,439 * −13.7%
1910 2,313 −5.2%
1920 5,124 121.5%
1930 2,283 * −55.4%
1940 2,645 15.9%
1950 3,875 46.5%
1960 7,584 95.7%
1970 11,061 45.8%
1980 19,061 72.3%
1990 28,808 51.1%
2000 36,634 27.2%
2010 38,303 4.6%
Est. 2013 39,299 [10] 2.6%
Population sources:
1790-1920[25] 1840[26] 1850-1870[27]
1850[28] 1870[29] 1880-1890[30]
1890-1910[31] 1910-1930[32]
1930-1990[33] 2000[34][35] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[19]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 38,303 people, 13,573 households, and 10,424 families residing in the township. The population density was 702.3 per square mile (271.2 /km2). There were 14,030 housing units at an average density of 257.3 per square mile (99.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 78.61% (30,109) White, 4.59% (1,757) Black or African American, 0.12% (46) Native American, 12.38% (4,743) Asian, 0.04% (15) Pacific Islander, 2.18% (834) from other races, and 2.09% (799) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 7.55% (2,893) of the population.[7]

There were 13,573 households, of which 40.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.7% were married couples living together, 8.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.2% were non-families. 19.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.81 and the average family size was 3.25.[7]

In the township, 26.4% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 25.6% from 25 to 44, 32.2% from 45 to 64, and 9.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.9 years. For every 100 females there were 95.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.4 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $105,429 (with a margin of error of +/- $2,892) and the median family income was $119,750 (+/- $2,852). Males had a median income of $81,807 (+/- $5,320) versus $52,366 (+/- $1,804) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $43,029 (+/- $1,701). About 0.8% of families and 1.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.1% of those under age 18 and 4.0% of those age 65 or over.[36]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 36,634 people, 12,649 households, and 9,802 families residing in the township. The population density was 669.9 people per square mile (258.6/km²). There were 12,854 housing units at an average density of 235.0 per square mile (90.7/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 85.96% White, 7.31% Asian, 3.76% African American, 0.09% American Indian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 1.28% from other races, and 1.53% from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 4.75% of the population.[34][35]

There were 12,649 households out of which 44.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them . said– 67.6% were married couples living together, 7.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.5% were non-families. 17.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.88, and the average family size was 3.31.[34][35]

In the township, the population was spread out with 29.1% under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 34.7% from 25 to 44, 23.3% from 45 to 64, and 6.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.1 males.[34][35]

The median income for a household in the township was $83,290, and the median income for a family was $93,933. Males had a median income of $62,273 versus $42,052 for females. The per capita income for the township was $33,091. About 2.1% of families and 3.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.6% of those under age 18 and 3.5% of those age 65 or over.[34][35]

History[edit]

On May 31, 1771, Hillsborough was officially granted a Charter incorporating it as a Township. A revised charter was issued on September 12, 1771.[19] The records of Hillsborough Township are complete from their inception in 1746 and there are ten volumes, each some several hundred pages, kept in the Special Collections Department of the Rutgers University Library along with the Charter.

Hillsborough Township quickly took its place in history as the path General George Washington and his troops traveled from the Battle of Princeton to winter quarters in Morristown. While the British were encamped in the valley below awaiting an opportunity to attack, it is said that Washington drilled his troops on the Sourland Mountain around a spring near the top using different formations and corn stalks for guns. As the sun caught the stalks, the British thought Washington had received reinforcements and fresh supplies. The British troops, thinking that they were outnumbered, slipped off to New Brunswick leaving Washington to continue to Morristown.

The township was formally incorporated on February 21, 1798.[19]

Hillsborough is the home of the Belle Mead GSA depot, or Belle Mead General Depot, which was a storage site for materials during World War II, along with housing Italian and German prisoners of war. It continued storing materials until the 1980s, and various contaminants have leaked into the ground and surrounding area during that time. Efforts are under way to convert the site into a mixed recreation and R&D complex.[37]

Hillsborough is home to Duke Gardens and Duke Farms, a 2,700 acres (11 km2) estate in the north-eastern quadrant of the town that was originally owned by tobacco and electric energy tycoon James "Buck" Duke and then passed down to daughter Doris Duke, and is now one of the few remaining "preserved" natural areas in Hillsborough Township.[38]

In Money magazine's 2013 Best Places to Live rankings, Hillsborough was ranked 16th in the nation, the third-highest among the three places in New Jersey included in the top 50 list.[39][40] In the magazine's 2007 rankings, the township was ranked as the 23rd best place to live in the nation.[41]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Hillsborough Township is governed under the Township Commission form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization held during the first week of January, the committee selects a Mayor and a Deputy Mayor from among its members[5] The mayor and deputy mayor are chosen by the Township Committee from among its members at an annual reorganization meeting, each serving a one-year term.

As of 2014, members of the Hillsborough Township Committee are Mayor Douglas Tomson (R, term on committee and as mayor ends December 31, 2014), Deputy Mayor Greg Burchette (R, term on committee ends 2015; term as deputy mayor ends 2014), Frank DelCore (R, 2016), Gloria McCauley (R, 2014) and Carl Suraci (R, 2015).[3][42][43][44]

Based on the results of a Charter Study Commission, a recommendation was listed on the November 2007 general election ballot proposing that the township adopt a Mayor-Council form of government under the Faulkner Act.[45] At the election, 58% of those voting chose to reject the proposed change, leaving Hillsborough's traditional township form of government unchanged.[46]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Hillsborough Township is located in the 7th Congressional District[47] and is part of New Jersey's 16th state legislative district.[8][48][49]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[50] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[51][52] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[53][54]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 16th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Christopher Bateman (R, Somerville) and in the General Assembly by Jack Ciattarelli (R, Hillsborough Township) and Donna Simon (R, Readington Township). [55][56] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[57] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[58]

Somerset County is governed by a five-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Director and Deputy Director from among its members.[59] As of 2014, Somerset County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Patrick Scaglione (R, Bridgewater Township, 2015),[60] Freeholder Deputy Director Mark Caliguire (R, Skillman in Montgomery Township, 2015),[61] Peter S. Palmer (R, Bernardsville, term ends December 31, 2014),[62] Patricia L. Walsh (R, Green Brook Township, 2016)[63] and Robert Zaborowski (R, Somerset in Franklin Township, 2014),[64][65] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Brett A. Radi (R, Somerville, 2017),[66] Sheriff Frank J. Provenzano (R, Raritan, 2016)[67][68] and Surrogate Frank Bruno (R, Branchburg, 2015).[69]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 24,841 registered voters in Hillsborough Township, of which 5,575 (22.4% vs. 26.0% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 5,507 (22.2% vs. 25.7%) were registered as Republicans and 13,745 (55.3% vs. 48.2%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 14 voters registered to other parties.[70] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 64.9% (vs. 60.4% in Somerset County) were registered to vote, including 88.1% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 80.4% countywide).[70][71]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 9,507 votes here (49.8% vs. 52.1% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 9,218 votes (48.2% vs. 46.1%) and other candidates with 250 votes (1.3% vs. 1.1%), among the 19,107 ballots cast by the township's 23,926 registered voters, for a turnout of 79.9% (vs. 78.7% in Somerset County).[72] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 9,246 votes here (53.0% vs. 51.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 7,965 votes (45.7% vs. 47.2%) and other candidates with 176 votes (1.0% vs. 0.9%), among the 17,433 ballots cast by the township's 21,152 registered voters, for a turnout of 82.4% (vs. 81.7% in the whole county).[73]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 7,436 votes here (59.9% vs. 55.8% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 3,765 votes (30.3% vs. 34.1%), Independent Chris Daggett with 1,046 votes (8.4% vs. 8.7%) and other candidates with 96 votes (0.8% vs. 0.7%), among the 12,416 ballots cast by the township's 24,456 registered voters, yielding a 50.8% turnout (vs. 52.5% in the county).[74]

Education[edit]

The Hillsborough Township School District serves students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. Students from Millstone attend the district's schools as part of a sending/receiving relationship.[75] As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's nine schools had an enrollment of 7,316 students and 611.5 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.96:1.[76] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics)[77] are six elementary schools for students in Kindergarten to fourth grade — Amsterdam Elementary School[78] (502 students), Hillsborough Elementary School[79] (524), Sunnymead Elementary School[80] (389), Triangle Elementary School[81] (419), Woodfern Elementary School[82] (383) and Woods Road Elementary School[83] (442) — Auten Road Intermediate School[84] (1,101 students; grades 5-6), Hillsborough Middle School[85] (1,135; 7-8) and Hillsborough High School[86] (2,421; 9-12).[87][88]

Transportation[edit]

The township had a total of 211.92 miles (341.05 km) of roadways, of which 185.42 miles (298.40 km) are maintained by the municipality, 19.79 miles (31.85 km) by Somerset County and 6.71 miles (10.80 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[89]

U.S. Route 206 is the main road that passes through the township. A new alignment of US 206 is being built to bypass the current congested stretch of the road. Main county roads that pass through are CR 514 and CR 533. Interstate 287 is outside the municipality in bordering Bridgewater and Franklin Townships.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Hillsborough Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ a b Township Committee, Hillsborough Township. Accessed February 13, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Administrator/Municipal Clerk, Hillsborough Township. Accessed August 22, 2014.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 77.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Hillsborough, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Hillsborough township, Somerset County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 26, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 8. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Hillsborough township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed August 26, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
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  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Hillsborough, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 26, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Hillsborough, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 11, 2013.
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  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed August 26, 2012.
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  20. ^ New Jersey Local Name Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed February 17, 2014.
  21. ^ Our Towns, Hillsborough Township. Accessed February 13, 2013. "Hillsborough is a collection of small villages, each of which has left its own imprint on the Townships history: BELLE MEAD, BLACKWELLS MILLS, FLAGTOWN, NESHANIC, SOUTH BRANCH"
  22. ^ "Monthly Averages for Hillsborough, NJ (08844)". Weather.com. Retrieved November 17, 2011. 
  23. ^ Fox unveils re-designed Hillsborough Bypass: New smart growth plan reduces sprawl, preserves more open space, New Jersey Department of Transportation press release dated December 20, 2002.
  24. ^ Paik, Eugene. "Hillsborough bypass plan for highway advances to next stage",The Star-Ledger, March 18, 2012. August 26, 2012. "Work has proceeded over the past year on a $110 million two-lane bypass around traffic-jammed Route 206 through Hillsborough, a 3.6-mile project nearly four decades in the making. The bypass would allow the municipality to transform the area around the currently gridlocked road into a pedestrian-friendly downtown."
  25. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  26. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed February 13, 2013.
  27. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 259, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed February 13, 2013. Hillsborough township is on the Millstone river. Its population in 1850 was 3,409; in 1860, 3,488; and in 1870, 3,444."
  28. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 141. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed February 13, 2013. Population of 3,444 is listed for 1870, which conflicts with 1870 Census data of 3,443.
  29. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed February 13, 2013.
  30. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed February 13, 2013.
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  34. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Hillsborough township, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 26, 2012.
  35. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Hillsborough township, Somerset County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 26, 2012.
  36. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Hillsborough township, Somerset County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 26, 2012.
  37. ^ Belle Mead GSA Depot, Hillsborough Township. Accessed August 26, 2012.
  38. ^ Haddon, Heather. "Duke Estate Reopens; Bucolic Grounds Become Public Park, Conservation Center", Wall Street Journal, May 2, 2012. Accessed August 26, 2012. "For years here amid the gentle hills of the Raritan River valley in suburban New Jersey, a 2,740-acre estate that once provided the setting for Doris Duke's ornamental gardens has largely been kept private.Now, after years of debate about how to handle the massive plot formerly owned by one of the world's richest women, the bucolic grounds known as Duke Farms are set to open to the public May 19 and become one of the largest privately owned public spaces in the U.S., estate officials said."
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  46. ^ "Voters Give Township Committee Form A Vote of Confidence", Hillsborough Township, November 7, 2007. Accessed May 26, 2011.
  47. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  48. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 59, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  49. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  50. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
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  52. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  53. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  54. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
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  61. ^ Mark Caliguire, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed August 5, 2014.
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  63. ^ Patricia Walsh, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed August 5, 2014.
  64. ^ The Role of County Government 'What Is A Freeholder?', Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed August 5, 2014.
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  66. ^ Biography: Somerset County Clerk Brett A. Radi, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed August 5, 2014.
  67. ^ Sheriff Frank J. Provenzano, Somerset County Sheriff's Office. Accessed August 5, 2014.
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