Hinge joint

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Hinge joint
Gray338.png
Metacarpophalangeal articulation and articulations of digit. Ulnar aspect.
Latin articulatio gynglimus
Gray's p.285
Anatomical terminology

A hinge joint (ginglymus) is a bone joint in which the articular surfaces are molded to each other in such the manner as to permit motion only in one plane.

The direction which the distal bone takes in this motion is seldom in the same plane as that of the axis of the proximal bone; there is usually a certain amount of deviation from the straight line during flexion. lar The articular surfaces of the bones are connected by strong collateral ligaments.

The best examples of ginglymus are the interphalangeal joints and the joint between the humerus and ulna. The knee joints and ankle joints are less typical, as they allow a slight degree of rotation or of side-to-side movement in certain positions of the limb. The knee is the largest hinge joint in the human body.

Hinge and pivot joints can be both considered cylindrical joints.[1] An hinge joint can be considered a modified sellar joint, with reduced movement.[2]

Polar objects that work like hinged joints are door hinges, closet doors, dog flaps etc.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Platzer, Werner (2008) Color Atlas of Human Anatomy, Volume 1, p.28
  2. ^ Rogers, Kara (2010) Bone and Muscle: Structure, Force, and Motion p.157


External links[edit]