Hisham Melhem

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Hisham Melhem
Ethnicity Lebanese
Alma mater Villanova University
Occupation journalist
Years active mid-1980s to present
Employer Al Arabiya News Channel, An-Nahar
Known for journalism, foreign policy analysis
Television Al Arabiya News Channel

Hisham Melhem (Arabic: هشام ملحمHišām Melḥem) is a Lebanese journalist, who serves currently as Washington bureau chief of Al Arabiya News Channel and correspondent for An-Nahar newspaper.[1]

Biography[edit]

Background[edit]

Melhem studied philosophy at Villanova University, and after graduating in 1976 with his B.A., spent three years working on a doctorate in philosophy at Georgetown University.[2]

Career[edit]

Melhem has reported for Radio Monte Carlo and Al-Qabas and An-Nahar newspapers and has served as Washington bureau chief for As-Safir newspaper.[2]

He has also been the Washington bureau chief for Al Arabiya, and hosted their U.S.-Arab relations program, Across the Ocean, for four years.[2][3][1]

He writes for others publications, appears on news programs, and speaks publicly.[4][5][6] He is an expert for the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars[7][8][9] He has appeared as a news commentator about Middle Eastern and other foreign policy areas on PBS NewsHour for nearly two decades.[10][11]

Interviews[edit]

On January 26, 2009, Al Arabiya News Network was given the first official interview with the newly inaugurated President Barack Obama: Melhem conducted the interview.[12][13]

Major interviews to date include:

Writings[edit]

  • Dual Containment: The Demise of a Fallacy (1997)[22][23]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Hisham Melhem". Al Arabiya. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c "Hisham Melhem". Alan L. Freed Associates. Retrieved 2009-01-28. 
  3. ^ "Interview: Hisham Melhem". PBS Frontline. September 2001. Retrieved 2009-01-28. 
  4. ^ "Interview: Hisham Melhem". PBS Frontline. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  5. ^ "Hisham Melhem". C-SPAN. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  6. ^ "Hisham Melhem". Aspen Ideas. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  7. ^ "Hisham Melhem". Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  8. ^ "Media Literacy: What Makes for Credible Reporting [Arabic]". U.S. Department of State. 10 May 2012. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  9. ^ "Keynote Speaker: Hisham Melhem". International Affairs Conference. June 2013. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  10. ^ "What Next for the Peace Process?". PBS News Hour. 6 November 1995. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  11. ^ "Golan Talks". PBS News Hour. 27 December 1995. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  12. ^ Macleod, Scott (2009-01-28). "How Al-Arabiya Got the Obama Interview". TIME. Retrieved 2009-01-28. 
  13. ^ Goldberg, Jeffrey (29 January 2009). "Hisham Melhem On His Big Scoop, and Big Changes Coming". Atlantic Monthly. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  14. ^ "Interview: Secretary Colin Powell". U.S. Department of State. 24 April 2003. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  15. ^ "Interview: Secretary Colin Powell". U.S. Department of State. 13 May 2004. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  16. ^ "Interview: Secretary Colin Powell". U.S. Department of State. 30 September 2004. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  17. ^ "Interview: Secretary Condoleezza Rice". U.S. Department of State. 3 March 2005. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  18. ^ "Interview: Secretary Condoleezza Rice". U.S. Department of State. 7 March 2007. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  19. ^ "Interview: Secretary Condoleezza Rice". U.S. Department of State. 16 October 2008. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  20. ^ "Interview: Hillary Rodham Clinton". U.S. Department of State. 10 November 2010. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  21. ^ "Interview: Hillary Rodham Clinton". U.S. Department of State. 14 February 2011. Retrieved 2009-01-28. 
  22. ^ Melhem, Hisham (1997). Dual Containment: The Demise of a Fallacy. Washington: Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, Georgetown University. 
  23. ^ "Dual Containment: The Demise of a Fallacy". Library of Congress. Retrieved 3 July 2013.