Hispanic Society of America

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Hispanic Society of America
WTM NewYorkDolls 010.jpg
Grounds of the Hispanic Society of America, with an equestrian statue of El Cid.
Hispanic Society of America is located in New York City
Hispanic Society of America
Magnify-clip.png
Location of the Hispanic Society in New York City
Established May 18, 1904; 110 years ago (1904-05-18)
Location New York, New York
Coordinates 40°50′01″N 73°56′47″W / 40.833521°N 73.946514°W / 40.833521; -73.946514
Type Art museum
Research library
Collection size 6,800 paintings
1,000 sculptures
175,000 photographs
250,000 books
Visitors 20,000
Director Mitchell Codding
Public transit access Subways: NYCS 1 at 157th Street
Buses: Bx6, M4, M5, and M100
Website www.hispanicsociety.org

The Hispanic Society of America is a museum and reference library for the study of the arts and cultures of Spain, Portugal, and Latin America. Founded in 1904 by Archer M. Huntington, the institution is free and open to the public at its original location in a Beaux Arts building on Audubon Terrace (at 155th Street and Broadway) in the lower Washington Heights area of New York City in the United States.[1]

Exterior sculpture at the Society includes work by Anna Hyatt Huntington and nine major reliefs by the Swiss-American sculptor Berthold Nebel, a commission that took ten years to complete.

Museum collections[edit]

The museum contains works by Diego Velázquez, Francisco de Goya, El Greco, and Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida, among others.

A major component of this museum is the Sorolla Room which was reinstalled in 2010. It displays the 14 massive paintings, the Visions of Spain, that Sorolla created from 1911 to 1919—commissioned by Archie Huntington. These magnificent paintings ring the large room (estimate: 50 ft square) and depict scenes from each of the provinces of Spain.

The rare books library maintains 15,000 books printed before 1700, including a first edition of Don Quijote.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lee, Felicia R. (November 11, 2011). "An Outpost for Old Spain in the Heights". The New York Times. Retrieved 21 April 2013. "The Hispanic Society of America is perhaps New York’s most misunderstood institution." 

External links[edit]