History of Chatham Islands numismatics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The history of Chatham Islands numismatics begins in 1999, when the Reserve Bank of New Zealand authorized a private organization, the Chatham Islands Note Corporation, to issue banknotes to celebrate that the Chatham Islands to be the first land to enter the third millennium.[n 1]

The Reserve Bank of New Zealand gave this authorization under the condition that such notes cannot be declared legal tender. In other words, these notes were to be used for payment, but only if the seller accepted them: there was no obligation for anyone to accept the notes issued by the Chatham Islands, contrarily to the notes issued by the Reserve Bank of New Zealand. These Chatham Islands notes were generally accepted by merchants on the Chatham Islands, some of whom served as Directors of the issuer itself.

The Chatham Islands Note Corporation was initially based in Christchurch, in the South Island of New Zealand. The agent for providing the notes to the numismatic trade was Leon Morel, Fellow of the Royal Numismatic Society of New Zealand of Melbourne, Victoria. The corporation later shifted their base of operations to Waitangi.

The Chatham Islands dollar (Ch.I$.) was pegged at the same rate as the New Zealand dollar. The Chatham Islands in the only place in the entire Commonwealth of Nations that has put an $8 note into circulation as currency.

"Negotiable" tender[edit]

The Reserve Bank of New Zealand clarified that Chatham Islands dollars are not legal tender.[1] In particular, Reserve Bank Deputy Governor Murray Sherwin said:"These so-called Chatham Island dollars are harmless as a promotional gimmick and as a bit of fun. Also, if people want to use them to undertake transactions, that's fine too, just as one can pay for a service with monopoly play money, sea shells, or bottles of beer, if the seller is happy to receive them."

The series[edit]

The series I notes, consisting of $2 (200c), $3 (300c), $10 (1,000c) and $15 (1,500c) denominations, and with a very strong influence from American currency designs, were printed in late 1999, still in time for their release on January 1, 2000. They were printed on Tyvek by Timely Marketing & Promotions Limited, Christchurch and Dunedin, New Zealand,[n 2] and are dual-denominated—in cents as well as in dollars. The same-numbered sets which came out in cardboard folders, also bear a completely different hologram, as compared to the currency issue.[n 3] There are three printings of this series[n 4]

The series II notes, consisting of $3 (300c), $5 (500c), $8 (800c), $10 (1,000c) and $15 (1,500c) denominations, were printed some time during the year 2000 for release in 2001. They are printed on cotton-fibre paper by Chan Wanich Security Printing Company Limited, Thailand. The front of these notes is very similar to the Series I notes, apart from the dates and a few other details. Again, these notes are dual-denominated in cents and dollars. There are also three printings of this series with same-serial numbered sets produced, but not in cardboard folders, having the same hologram as the currency issue.

In 2001, a $5 coin was put into circulation at the same time as the Series II notes. A 5,000 piece issue was then planned. Informed of the intention to issue a coin, the Reserve Bank of New Zealand banned the issue, despite the fact that there is no $5 coin in circulation in New Zealand. However, an estimated 200 pieces ended up in the numismatic trade.[n 5]

Description[edit]

To assist collectors and dealers, a catalogue numbering system has been provided. Below, 'Work' numbers (indicated by the letter 'W') to the items, have been assigned for clarity.[2]

Series I[edit]

The date '2000' is in the 4 corners. The notes have the map of the Chatham Islands at left of the under-print and Chatham Islands Taiko at right. Green frame on the backs of the notes. Printer's name at the bottom on the backs of the notes. A hologram depicts a globe showing the Asia-Pacific region with '1st' superimposed, an inner circle with the words 'WORLD FIRST' and 'AUTHENTIC' (which can be seen depending on the direction in which a note is tilted), and an outer circle, which has a rainbow pattern going around like a flywheel. The notes of the same-serial numbered folder issue has '1st' printed in white on top of the hologram, which has an interlocking pattern consisting of the year 2000.

$2 (The Sea)[edit]

W1a. Two dollars (200 cents).

  • Front: Purple and grey-blue under-print.
  • Back: Lobster, the sea and Chatham Islands Black Robin.
  • Theme: The Sea.

W1b. Same-serial numbered folder issue.

  • As above currency issue.

$3 (The Community)[edit]

W2a. Three dollars (300 cents).

  • Front: As above, but purple and red-pink under-print.
  • Back: First motor vehicle, the community and Chatham Islands Black Robin.
  • Theme: The Community.

W2b. Same-serial numbered folder issue.

  • As above currency issue.

$10 (The History)[edit]

W3a. Ten dollars (1,000 cents).

  • Front: As above, but green and yellow-brown under-print.
  • Back: The history and Chatham Islands Black Robin.
  • Theme: The History.

W3b. Same-serial numbered folder issue.

  • As above currency issue.

$15 (The Land)[edit]

W4a. Fifteen dollars (1,500 cents).

  • Front: As above, but green and brown under-print.
  • Back: Nikau palm, Chathams' horse power and Chatham Islands Black Robin.
  • Theme: The Land.

W4b. Same-serial numbered folder issue.

  • As above currency issue.

Series II[edit]

They are made of cotton fibre paper. The date 2001 is in three corners. The notes have an albatross replacing the map of the Chatham Islands at left of the under-print. Chatham Islands Taiko at right. Olive-green-black frames on the backs of the notes. The currency notes and the ones in the same-numbered sets have computer style numbering in the serial numbers whereas the replacement notes have block numbers in the serial numbers. The hologram of the notes depicts a compass with a wavy pattern in the outer silver area. The map of the Chatham Islands and the Chatham Islands Note Corporation is seen when a note is tilted in one direction and a rock lobster can be seen when the note is tilted in the other direction. The printer name is at the bottom on the backs of the notes.

$3 (Horse Racing)[edit]

W5a. Three dollars (300 cents).

  • Front: Pink and yellow under-print.
  • Back: Horse racing, Chatham Islands Jockey Club (1873), Woytek's Fool.
  • Theme: Horse Racing.

W5b. Same-serial numbered issue.

  • As above currency issue.

W5p. As above currency issue, but has the serial number 'A000000'. (Printer's Specimen).

W5r. As above currency issue, but the serial number has a star at the end of it. (Replacement note).

$5 (The Ancestors)[edit]

W6a. Five dollars (500 cents).

  • Front: As above, but green and yellow under-print.
  • Back: Morioris, Woytek's Generations.
  • Theme: The Ancestors.

W6b. Same-serial numbered issue.

  • As above currency issue.

W6p. As above currency issue, but has the serial number 'A000000'. (Printer's Specimen).

W6r. As above currency issue, but the serial number has a star at the end of it. (Replacement note).

$8 (Center — The Message)[edit]

W7a. Eight dollars (800 cents).

  • Front: As above, but lilac and blue under-print.
  • Back: A new dawn with the Spring symphony and guardians of Mt Hakepa, Pitt Island. Map of the Chatham Islands.
  • Theme: Center — The Message.

W7b. Same-serial numbered issue.

  • As above currency issue.

W7p. As above currency issue, but has the serial number 'A000000'. (Printer's Specimen).

W7r. As above, but the serial number has a star at the end of it. (Replacement note).

$10 (Wrestle)r[edit]

W8a. Ten dollars (1,000 cents).

  • Front: As above, but lilac-blue and green-yellow under-print.
  • Back: Abe Jacobs World Champion Wrestler, Woytek's Warrior.
  • Theme: Wrestler.

W8b. Same-serial numbered issue.

  • As above currency issue.

W8p. As above currency issue, but has the serial number 'A000000'. (Printer's Specimen).

W8r. As above currency issue, but the serial number has a star at the end of it. (Replacement note).

$15 (Flying Boat)[edit]

W9a. Fifteen dollars (1,500 cents).

  • Front: As above, but blue, pink and yellow under-print.
  • Back: Short Sunderland, Woytek's Astronomer.
  • Theme: Flying Boat.

W9b. Same-serial numbered issue.

  • As above currency issue.

W9p. As above currency issue, but has the serial number 'A000000'. (Printer's Specimen).

W9r. As above currency issue, but the serial number has a star at the end of it. (Replacement note).

Collector Series[edit]

  • WCSI. Series I Same-serial numbered folder issue (W1b — W4b).
  • WCSII. Series II Same-serial numbered issue (W5b — W9b).

Uncut Sheets[edit]

These were only issued for Series II (W5 - W9). These have a four digit serial number range from S0001 to S1000.

  • WUSI. 4x$3.
  • WUSII. 3x$5.
  • WUSIII. 3x$8.
  • WUSIV. 2x$10.
  • WUSV. 2x$15.

Signature Chart[edit]

  • Director of the Corporation  — Secretary of the Treasury.
  • Series I. Clint McInnes. John Day.
  • Series II. Indecipherable. J. Day.

Error notes are not listed, even though these do exist, nor have the Postal Notes and Postal Orders that were issued in the Chatham Islands.

WCI. Brass $5 Coin 1-1/4 inches (30 mm) in diameter[edit]

  • Obverse: A crude head-and-shoulders portrait of Tommy Solomon (born 1884, died 1933. Popularly believed to have been the last full-blooded Moriori) splitting the date '2001'. The inscription,'FIVE NEW MILLENNIUM DOLLARS' is below the portrait.
  • Reverse: Map of the Chatham Islands with '$5' below. It is inscribed, 'CHATHAM ISLANDS NEW ZEALAND TERRITORIES SOUTH PACIFIC'.

WCII. Silver $50 Coin 1.5 inches (38 mm) in diameter[edit]

  • Obverse: A crude portrait of King George III (ruled 1760–1820) based on Benedetto Pistrucci's portrait as used on the British 1/2 Crown of 1817–20, the 5-shilling (1 Crown) of 1818–20, 1/2 Sovereign of 1817–20, the Sovereign of 1818 and 1820, the 2 pounds and 5 pounds pattern coins of 1820. The monogram 'G III' is split at the forehead level. The inscription, 'CHATHAM ISLANDS' is above the King's portrait. The dates '1760–1820' are inscribed below the chin. The date '2001' appears below the truncation. The inscription, 'FIFTY DOLLAR MILLENNIUM SILVER PIECE' goes from behind the King's portrait around to the front at eye level.
  • Reverse: The design is a compass pointing North, a ship, and an 18th Century Royal Navy officer's hat with the number '50' superimposed on the hat. The outer inscriptions are 'LIEUT BROUGHTON. BRIG CHATHAM 1791'. The inner inscription is 'DISCOVERY OF THE CHATHAM ISLANDS 44 DEG S LAT 176 DEG 20 MIN W LONG'. The inscription 'FIFTY DOLLAR PIECE' appears below the '50'.
  • The $50 coin is a dual commemorative: The Millennium and the 210th Anniversary of the British discovery of the Chatham Islands.
  • Both the $5 and the $50 coins have milled edges.

The Reserve Bank of New Zealand banned the issue of the coin in 2001. There are not more than 25 pieces of the $50 coin known to exist.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

Additional information[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Although this allegation sounds true, actually it isn't. This honour belongs to Antarctica. The first island to enter the third millennium would be the Millennium Island.
  2. ^ Tyvek is a plastic-type material that is used in the construction industry.
  3. ^ The hologram is a very good security device, as it prevents forgery.
  4. ^ Those of the 3rd printing are the only ones that have been seen by one of the authors.
  5. ^ There are 2 possible scenarios as to why only around 200 of the Chatham Islands $5 coins are known to exist, that is, the 5,000 pieces were struck ready to be issued and the coins were confiscated, and as a result around 200 coins ended up in the numismatic trade, or it is also possible that the 200 known pieces had been struck and issued to the numismatic trade (or to Leon Morel) prior to the ban.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Reserve Bank of New Zealand. "Chatham Islands "dollars" not legal tender". RBNZ.gov. Retrieved 9 January 2012. 
  2. ^ World Paper Money Catalog and History. "Chatham Islands banknotes (private issue)". Atsnotes.com. Retrieved 9 January 2013. 

External links[edit]