History of Vancouver Whitecaps FC

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The history of Vancouver Whitecaps FC, a professional soccer team based in Vancouver, Canada, spans over four decades. The first team to use the "Whitecaps" name was the Vancouver Whitecaps of the now-defunct North American Soccer League, playing from 1974 to 1984. After two years while the core of the players were focused on preparations for the 1986 World Cup, a second version of the club was founded in 1986 as the Vancouver 86ers. This team bought back the Whitecaps name in 2000 and has operated continuously in various leagues since 1986. A Whitecaps FC team began play in Major League Soccer starting in 2011 making it the first time since 1984 that a "Whitecaps" team played in the top tier of soccer in the United States and Canada.

NASL (1974–84)[edit]

The original Vancouver Whitecaps were founded on December 11, 1973 and during the 1970s and 1980s played in the North American Soccer League (NASL). The founding investors in the club were: Herb Capozzi, president; Denny Veitch, general manager; C. N. "Chunky" Woodward owner of Woodwards Department Stores; Chuck Wills, lawyer; Wendy McDonald, president of B.C. Bearing Engineers; Pat McCleary and Harry Moll, proprietors of Charlie Brown Steak House.[1]

The Whitecaps achieved success, winning the 1979 Soccer Bowl coached by Tony Waiters. The Whitecaps of that era included international players such as Alan Ball, but also "home grown" stars like Bobby and Sam Lenarduzzi, Buzz Parsons, and Glen Johnson. In 1979 the team from the "Village of Vancouver" (a reference to ABC TV sportscaster Jim McKay's observation that "Vancouver must be like the deserted village right now", with so many people watching the game on TV) beat the powerhouse New York Cosmos in one of the most thrilling playoff series in NASL history to advance to the Soccer Bowl. In the Soccer Bowl, they triumphed against the Tampa Bay Rowdies in a disappointed New York City.

It was during this short period that soccer interest peaked in Vancouver. The Whitecaps attendance at Empire Stadium grew to regular sellouts, at 32,000. The team also recorded two tracks, with "White is the Colour" becoming a hit on local radio during the run-up to their championship win.

After playing at Vancouver's 32,000-seat Empire Stadium for most of their existence, the team moved into the brand new 60,000-seat BC Place Stadium in 1983. The Whitecaps set a then highest all-time Canadian attendance record of 60,342 spectators for a professional soccer game, on June 20, 1983, Vancouver Whitecaps FC - Seattle Sounders at BC Place.[2] However, the subsequent demise of the NASL in 1984 meant the Whitecaps – along with the other teams in the NASL – were forced to fold.

CSL (1985–92)[edit]

Several of the players from the NASL Vancouver Whitecaps were members of the Canadian Men's National Team preparing for the 1986 World Cup in training camps held in Vancouver. They played exhibition games against teams in the Western Soccer Alliance Challenge Series in 1985. Several are listed on the 1986 FIFA World Cup squads lists as playing for the MISL's Tacoma Stars for the indoor season and played with the Canadian National Men's Team for the outdoor summer season.

The Vancouver 86ers Soccer Club started operations in November 1985 by the community-owned West Coast Soccer Society. Tony Waiters, Les Wilson and Dave Fryatt were the first franchise holders granted the rights for Vancouver on July 26, 1986.[3] The Vancouver 86ers were so named because of the year of the team's founding-1986, the 86 principals underwriting the club, and to commemorate the year the city of Vancouver was founded (1886). There were a lot of ties between the Whitecaps and the 86ers such as Tony Waiters (shareholder), Buzz Parsons (manager 1987-88), Bob Lenarduzzi (coach 1987-1993), Carl Valentine, Jim Easton, David Norman (soccer), Dale Mitchell (soccer), and other players. In newspaper reports the Whitecaps were often referred to as the previous version of the CSL's Vancouver 86ers. Several attempts were made to purchase the Whitecaps name; however, the name was not for sale or the owner wanted too much money for the cash strapped community-owned club.[4]

The Vancouver 86ers played its first game in 1987 in the Canadian Soccer League against Edmonton. The 86ers played in the Canadian Soccer League (CSL) winning four straight CSL Championships (1988–1991) and five consecutive CSL regular-season first-place finishes (1988–92). Vancouver played in the CSL from its inception in 1987 until the league folded in 1992, and then moved over to the APSL in 1993 which was later absorbed into the USL hierarchy of leagues in 1997 becoming the A-League, later renamed the USL-1.

In 1988–1989, the team, coached by Bob Lenarduzzi, set a North American professional sports record by playing 46 consecutive games without a loss. The record began after the June 1988 match the 86ers lost 3–1 away to the North York Rockets. Vancouver then won 37 matches and tied nine others before falling 2–1 away to the Edmonton Brickmen in August 1989. In 2004 the BC Sports Hall of Fame inducted the 1989 soccer team.[5] Also in 1988 the Vancouver 86ers and Calgary Kickers played six friendly matches each against the Western Soccer Alliance in the month of May.[6]

In 1990, the Vancouver 86ers captured the North American Club Championship after defeating the Maryland Bays 3–2 in the final played in Burnaby. The game was played between the champions of the Canadian Soccer League and the champions of the American Professional Soccer League (APSL).[7] The Vancouver 86ers withdrew from the 1992 CONCACAF Champions' Cup prior to the opening Group 2 first round match due to financial constraints. The 86ers also came up short in the first round of the 1992 ‘Professional Cup’ North American Club Championship where they faced APSL champions Colorado Foxes over two legs.

APSL / A-League / USL-1 (1993–2010)[edit]

In 1999 Vancouver's player-coach who was one of North American soccer's last active participants in the NASL, Carl Valentine, retired.[8]

With whole hearted support from the fans the new owner, David Stadnyk, bought the name Whitecaps from former NASL Whitecaps director John Laxton. October 26, 2000 the Vancouver 86ers formally changed their name back to the Whitecaps.[9]

In the 2001 season, the team began to use the old Vancouver Whitecaps moniker. The club adopted a similar crest to that of the NASL team featuring a wave. A white cap is a nautical term for a wind wave, not a surf wave. White caps are indicative of Force 4/5 wind and a 4–6 foot (1.2-1.5m) wave height. For smaller boat craft, the appearance of white caps are a sign of rising wind and danger often necessitating a return to harbour.[10][11][12] With the re-branding process of the MLS franchise, the club crest was expanded to include the white caps of snow covered mountains and include all of the province of BC.[13]

In 2003, the name was again changed, albeit only slightly, to Whitecaps FC, which encompasses the men's, women's, and youth development teams within the organization. At this time, the Whitecaps logo changed slightly in colour (the light teal-green was replaced with a brighter blue) and the word "Vancouver" was dropped from the image.

In 2006, the Whitecaps organization won an unprecedented double-championship, claiming both the USL-1 championship trophy, defeating the host Rochester Rhinos 3–0 at PAETEC Park, and winning the W-League women's championship. The men's team also won the Nation's Cup, a new tournament established by their club as a way to feature the Whitecaps playing against international competition. The 2006 Nation's Cup tournament featured the Chinese and Indian U-20 National teams and Championship Welsh club Cardiff City F.C. (the "Bluebirds"). They also gradually added the "Vancouver" back into their name, changing it officially to "Vancouver Whitecaps FC".

The following season, the Whitecaps signed a deal to play an exhibition match against the Los Angeles Galaxy, which featured international David Beckham, and promoted Director of Soccer Operations Bob Lenarduzzi to team president. USL-1 teams especially those in the USA competing in the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup, were beginning to see with marketing that MLS teams could be a larger draw as MLS's quality of play increased and the league gained a greater profile.

October 12, 2008, they claimed their second United Soccer Leagues First Division championship with a 2–1 victory over the Puerto Rico Islanders. Charles Gbeke scored twice with his head in the second half to help secure the title. In 2009, they placed 7th in the league and were eliminated in the final by the Montreal Impact on a 6–3 aggregate.[14]

MLS (2011–)[edit]

The Vancouver franchise was granted status on March 18, 2009 by MLS Commissioner Don Garber as the seventeenth franchise of Major League Soccer.[15] It is to join the Portland Timbers, announced two days later as the eighteenth MLS franchise, for the 2011 MLS season. While no name was provided at the Vancouver announcement, over a year later the club confirmed that the MLS team would keep the Whitecaps name.[16][17][18][19]

In preparation for its inaugural season, the Whitecaps brought in executive talent from around the world. On November 24, 2009, Paul Barber, former Tottenham Hotspur F.C. executive, was announced to join the club as CEO. Others joining him include former D.C. United head coach Tom Soehn as Director of Operations and Dutch national Richard Grootscholten as the technical director and head coach of the residency program. Former Iceland international Teitur Thordarson was confirmed as head coach on September 2, 2010 for the inaugural MLS season.[20] He held the same position with the USL-1 and later USSF Division 2 Whitecaps.

Season-by-Season results[edit]

  • Note: Click on the year for the Whitecaps NASL season wiki.
  • Note: Click on League for the league's season wiki.
Season Regular Season Playoffs Canadian
Championship
Cascadia
Cup
CONCACAF Top goalscorer[21]
League GP W D L GF GA Pts Att Pos Name Goals
1974 NASL 20 5 4 11 29 30 70 10,979 4th; West
11th; Overall
DNQ N / A Brian Gant[22] 6
1975 NASL 22 11 0 11 38 28 99 7,579 4th; West
9th; Overall
DNQ N / A Glen Johnson[23] 8
1976 NASL 24 14 0 10 38 30 120 8,655 3rd; Pacific
10th; Overall
Play-In Round
Seattle 1-0 Vancouver
N / A Tommy Ord
Billy Woof
Tony McAndrew[24]
5
1977 NASL 26 14 0 12 43 36 124 11,897 2nd; Pacific
6th; Overall
Play-In Round
Seattle 1-0 Vancouver
N / A Derek Possee [25] 11
1978 NASL 30 24 0 6 68 29 199 15,736 1st; National West
2nd; Overall
Quarterfinals
Portland def Vancouver 2-0
(games)
N / A Kevin Hector [26] 21
1979 NASL 30 20 0 10 54 34 172 22,962 1st; National West
4th; Overall
Champion
Vancouver 2-1 Tampa Bay
N / A Kevin Hector [27] 15
1980 NASL 32 16 0 16 52 47 139 26,834 3rd; National West
15th; Overall
Round of 16
Seattle def Vancouver 2-0
(games)
N / A Trevor Whymark [28] 15
1981 NASL 32 21 0 11 74 43 186 23,236 1st; Northwest
3rd; Overall
Round of 16
Tampa Bay def Vancouver 2-0
(games)
N / A Carl Valentine [29] 10
1982 NASL 32 20 0 12 58 48 160 18,254 3rd; West
5th; Overall
Quarterfinals
San Diego def Vancouver 2-1
(games)
N / A Ray Hankin [30] 11
1983 NASL 30 24 0 6 63 34 187 29,166 1st; West
2nd; Overall
Quarterfinals
Toronto def Vancouver 2-1
(games)
N / A David Cross [31] 19
1984 NASL 24 13 0 11 51 48 117 15,190 2nd; West
4th; Overall
Semifinals
Chicago def Vancouver 2-1
(games)
N / A Peter Ward[32] 16
1985
1986
1987 CSL 20 9 3 8 37 27 21 5,993 2nd; West
4th; Overall
Semifinals
Calgary 4-3 Vancouver
Domenic Mobilio [33] 12
1988 CSL 28 21 6 1 84 30 48 4,919 1st; West
1st; Overall
Champion
Vancouver 4-1 Hamilton
John Catliff [34]
Domenic Mobilio[35]
22
1989 CSL 26 18 6 2 65 33 42 4,572 1st; West
1st; Overall
Champion
Vancouver 3-2 Hamilton
Domenic Mobilio[35] 12
1990 CSL 26 17 3 6 69 26 40 4,218 1st; West
1st; Overall
Champion
Vancouver 6-1 Hamilton
John Catliff [7] 19
1991 CSL 28 20 4 4 69 31 64 4,579 1st; Single Table Champion
Vancouver 5-3 Toronto
1st Round Domenic Mobilio [36] 26
1992 CSL 20 11 3 6 42 28 36 4,344 1st; Single Table Runner-Up
Winnipeg 3-1 Vancouver(Agg)
John Catliff
Dale Mitchell[37]
6
1993 APSL 24 15 0 9 43 35 126 4,853 1st; Single Table Semifinals
Los Angeles 2-2 Vancouver (PK)
N / A Domenic Mobilio [38] 11
1994 APSL 20 7 0 13 25 41 65 4,742 6th; Single Table DNQ N / A Domenic Mobilio [39] 7
1995 A-League 24 10 3 11 43 43 33 4,493 3rd; Single Table Semifinals
Seattle def Vancouver 2-0
(games)
N / A Giuliano Oliviero [40] 9
1996 A-League 24 10 3 14 38 38 33 4,068 5th; Single Table DNQ N / A Domenic Mobilio [41] 14
1997 A-League 24 10 3 14 38 38 33 3,558 3rd; Pacific
6th; Overall
Semifinals
Milwaukee def Vancouver 2-1
PK (games)
N / A Domenic Mobilio [42] 22
1998 A-League 28 13 3 15 55 42 41 4,185 4th; Pacific
15th; Overall
Round of 16
Seattle 2-1 Vancouver
N / A Jason Jordan [43] 8
1999 A-League 28 19 4 9 77 31 84 4,559 2nd; Pacific
3rd; Overall
Round of 16
US Pro 40 3-1 Vancouver
N / A Niall Thompson [44] 20
2000 A-League 28 14 3 11 62 41 70 3,959 3rd; Pacific
9th; Overall
Quarterfinals
Minnesota 4-3 Vancouver
(Agg via OT)
N / A Darren Tilley [45] 12
2001 A-League 26 16 2 8 44 33 74 5,542 1st; Western
4th; Overall
Semi-finals
Hershey 4-1 Vancouver
(Agg)
N / A Jason Jordan [46] 9
2002 A-League 28 11 5 12 41 39 54 3,769 4th; Pacific
11th; Overall
Semi-finals
Milwaukee 2-1 Vancouver
(Agg via OT)
N / A Jason Jordan [47] 9
2003 A-League 28 15 7 6 45 24 52 4,292 2nd; Pacific
5th; Overall
Quarterfinals
Seattle 1-1 Vancouver
(Agg via 6-5 in PKs)
N / A Oliver Heald
Jason Jordan[48]
9
2004 A-League 28 14 5 9 38 29 47 4,833 2nd; Western
6th; Overall
Semi-finals
Seattle 2-1 Vancouver
(Agg)
Winner N / A Jason Jordan [49] 7
2005 USL-1 28 12 9 7 37 21 45 5,086 3rd; Single Table Play-In Round
Richmond 0-0 Vancouver
(Agg 5-4 in PKs)
Winner N / A Jason Jordan [50] 17
2006 USL-1 28 12 10 6 40 28 46 5,085 4th; Single Table Champion
Vancouver 3-0 Rochester
Runner-Up N / A Joey Gjertsen [51] 12
2007 USL-1 28 9 12 7 27 24 39 5,162 7th; Single Table Quarterfinals
Portland 3-1 Vancouver
(Agg)
Runner-Up N / A Eduardo Sebrango-Rodriguez [52] 7
2008 USL-1 30 15 8 7 34 28 53 4,999 2nd; Single Table Champion
Vancouver 2-1 Portland
3rd Winner DNQ Eduardo Sebrango-Rodriguez [53] 16
2009 USL-1 30 11 9 10 42 36 42 5,312 7th; Single Table Runner-Up
Montreal 6-3 Vancouver
(Agg)
Runners-up Runner-Up DNQ Charles Gbeke [54] 13
2010 USSF D2 30 10 15 5 32 22 45 5,152 2nd; NASL
5th; Overall
Semifinals
Puerto Rico 2-0 Vancouver
(Agg)
Runners-up Runner-Up DNQ Martin Nash [55] 5
2011 MLS 34 6 10 18 35 55 28 20,412 9th; West
18th; Overall
DNQ Runners-up 3rd DNQ Camilo Sanvezzo [56] 13
2012 MLS 34 11 13 10 35 41 43 18,998 5th; West
11th; Overall
Play-In Round
Los Angeles 2-1 Vancouver
Runners-up 3rd DNQ Darren Mattocks 9
2013 MLS 34 13 12 9 53 45 48 20,059 7th; West
14th; Overall
DNQ Runners-up Winner DNQ Camilo Sanvezzo 25
2014 MLS 34 12 8 14 42 40 50 20,623 5th; West
9th; Overall
Knockout Round
FC Dallas 2-1 Vancouver Whitecaps
Semi-Finals Winner DNQ Pedro Morales 9
2015 MLS - - - - - - - - -; West
-; Overall
- 2015 Canadian Championship - - - -
  • Note: Goals scored where possible in meaningful games, i.e. Cups, regular season, and playoffs, not preseason or friendlies.
  • Note: NASL draws were settled via penalty kicks 1975-6, and with shootouts 1977-84
  • Note: The NASL had bonus points for goals scored, and gave 6 points for a win.
  • Note: APSL Scoring systems:[57]
1991-1994: 6 = win, 4 = SW, 2 = SL, 0 = Loss + 1 pt up to 3 gpg
1995: 3 = win, 2 = SW, 1 = SL, 0 = Loss.
1996: 3 = win, 1 = SW, 0 = loss or SL.
  • Note: The Canadian Championship for the Voyageurs Cup began in 2008 with Canada's allocation of a CCL spot.
  • Note: The Cascadia Cup is a fan-owned trophy awarded to the winning team's fans that began in 2004.
  • Note: N/A indicates CONCACAF did not award Canada a slot in the CONCACAF Champions League or its predecessor tournament. In the NASL years of 1974-1984 the NASL did not compete in the CONCACAF Champions Cup. CONCACAF awarded spots to the National Soccer League until financial restraints in the Ontario-based league led to the withdrawal of Canadian clubs from international club tournaments. British Columbia clubs competed in alternative international competitions such as the John F. Kennedy Trophy.

Pos. = Position; GP = Match played; W = Win; D = Draw; L = Lost; GF = Goal For; GA = Goal Against; Pts = Points; Att = Attendance; DNQ = Did Not Qualify
Colors: Gold = winner; Silver = runner-up; Cyan = ongoing

Honours[edit]

Domestic[edit]

Canadian Championship for the Voyageurs Cup trophy.

League[edit]

NASL[edit]

Soccer Bowl/League Championship

Regular Season

Division Championship

CSL[edit]

League Championship

  • Winner (4): 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991
  • Runner-up (1): 1992

Regular Season

  • Winner (5): 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992

Division Championship

  • Winner (3): 1988, 1989, 1990

APSL / A-League / USL-1[edit]

League Championship

Regular Season

Division Championship

Other[edit]

Cascadia Cup

  • Winner (4): 2004, 2005, 2008, 2013

Rivalries[edit]

The Whitecaps have two sets of rivalries being a Canadian team playing in American leagues as well as having geography and historical leagues contribute to Pacific Northwest rivalries.

Cascadia[edit]

Historically since the earliest days of soccer in the late 1890s BC-based teams have played at tournaments, festivals, and had exhibitions to determine the best team in the Pacific Northwest. Before the railways established links eastward, travel was south via steamship to San Francisco and then to the outside world. Even afterward until at least 1910 BC commonly looked south instead of east. Leagues such as the Pacific Coast Soccer League and most other popular sports played teams from Seattle, Portland, and even San Francisco occasionally. Even afterward there were competitions oriented north-south that top teams such as the Westminster Royals competed in. In the original NASL, the Vancouver Royals had links to the San Francisco Golden Gate Gales.

In 1974 when the Vancouver Whitecaps and Seattle Sounders joined the NASL, it is safe to assume fans were already used to travelling between the two cities to watch sporting events. There are fond reminisces about 3000-5000 Whitecaps fans drowning out Sounders fans at the Kingdome during the NASL era. There were links between staff and players between the Timbers, Sounders, and Whitecaps. Former teammates such as Alan Hinton or Brian Gant played for the nearest rivals. Even off the field there are similar stories; the Vancouver play-by-play radio broadcaster got the job at the last minute after the former Seattle Sounder broadcaster skipped out on Vancouver to take the job in Portland.

The Whitecaps won a title, while the Sounders were runners up twice, and Timbers runners up once. The three teams ended each other’s seasons five times in the eleven years the Whitecaps played in the league. The Whitecaps first two playoff appearances were both 1-0 losses to the Seattle Sounders in 1976 and 1977. In 1978 the Whitecaps would lose to the Portland Timbers in the playoff semi-finals.

The three clubs played exhibition matches after the NASL folded in the Western Soccer Alliance and in 1994 the Seattle Sounders and Whitecaps (as the 86ers) were both in the A-League (1995–2004). The Portland Timbers joined the A League in 2001. They eliminated each other in the playoffs five times in the A League. From 2005 – 2009, the league was named USL-1 or USL First Division. The Whitecaps and Sounders were the two most dominate teams in USL-1 with two championships each. The three teams eliminated each other in the USL-1 playoffs four times. In all the years of division 2 soccer since 1996, the Whitecaps have been the dominant team with 1.55 points per game while the Sounders earned 1.54, and Timbers 1.47 points per game. The Sounders have 4 championships to the Whitecaps 2.

The supporters groups of the teams created the Cascadia Cup in 2004. As of 2013, each team has won the cup three times each over the nine years of the cup’s existence.

Canadian Teams[edit]

Division 2 Toronto based teams have generally not been as strong as Montreal and Vancouver. The Toronto Blizzard (original NASL) were runners-up twice and Toronto Metros-Croatia won the Soccer Bowl. Vancouver Whitecaps' first playoff win was against the Toronto Metros-Croatia August 9, 1978 in front of 30,811 at Empire Stadium (at the time the largest crowd to see two Canadian teams play against each other).[58] The Toronto Metros-Croatia team felt the goalkeeper was interfered with on the second goal and planned to protest the result even having lost 4-0. Generally Vancouver Whitecaps teams have dominated Toronto based teams especially in the CSL and US-based D2 leagues. When Montreal and Vancouver were in the USSF Division 2 and USL-1 playing Toronto FC in the Voyageurs Cup, the rivalry had greater meaning for Vancouver as it was the chance to prove themselves in a meaningful game against competition that was higher level only by fiat.

The rivalry against Montreal is another matter. In the original Canadian Soccer League (1987–92) with the 86ers head coach, Bob Lenarduzzi, taking on the Canadian Men's National Team management, many of the players for the Montreal Supra took umbrage at not being called up for the national team and there was a "real hatred" between the players.[59] Most of those players joined the debuting Montreal Impact of the APSL when the CSL folded. Former players remember trips such as one in 1996 when fire alarms were pulled at 2am and training facilities were not made available when promised plus other antics. Montreal Impact also won the first seven Voyageurs Cup competitions.

In the 2006 USL-1 playoff semifinals the Whitecaps outplayed the Impact in the first leg at Vancouver's Swanguard Stadium, and the second leg hosted by Montreal finished 0-0 as well. After extra-time, the Whitecaps defeated the Impact 2-0.

The Whitecaps and Impact also faced-off in the USL-1 playoff finals in 2008 and 2009. The Impact won the first leg hosted in Montreal 1-0, but lost the 2008 semifinal after the Whitecaps won the second leg at Swanguard 2-0. The most controversial game between the two clubs was in 2009.

In 2009 Montreal Impact did not play their usual starters in the Voyageurs Cup round robin competition allowing Toronto FC a 1-6 win to defeat the Whitecaps on goal difference. After fielding their reserve team for the Voyageurs Cup game on June 18, 2009 and preventing the Whitecaps from their second CONCACAF Champions League appearance, the Whitecaps could not avenge the unsportsmanlike conduct as the Montreal Impact also defeated them in the USL-1 playoff final 6-3 (aggregate).[60] The Whitecaps got early red cards in both legs. In the first leg after going down a man due to Montreal Impact player Roberto Brown's acting performance after a foul, the Whitecaps came back twice to equalize before a former Whitecap, playing for Montreal, scored the winner in the 89th minute.

2009 Montreal Controversy[edit]

  • 18–06–2009 : After losing any chance to win the round robin, the Impact lose 1-6 to TFC giving the Voyageurs Cup to TFC over Vancouver on goal difference while coach Marc Dos Santos rests key players for the league match against Vancouver two days later. The Vancouver Whitecaps team attended the TFC-Impact game.[61]
  • 20–06–2009 : Two days later Montreal Impact win their USL-1 league game 2-1 against Vancouver. The Montreal Ultras protest against Impact team management's unsportsmanlike behaviour two days earlier during the first half.[62]
  • 18–09–2009 : End of the season league standings...the extra 3 pts they got against Vancouver is the difference between 5th and 7th giving the Montreal Impact home advantage over the Whitecaps.
  • 17–10–2009 : Montreal Impact win the league playoff final's second leg 3-1 at home, and Montreal wins the USL-1 Championship 6-3 on aggregate.[63]

List of Players[edit]

All-time rosters[edit]

Captains[edit]

Name Nationality Years Ref.
Willie Stevenson  SCO 1974 [64]
Sam Lenarduzzi  CAN 1974-1975 [64]
Bruce Wilson  CAN 1976-1977 [64][65]
Jon Sammels  ENG 1978
John Craven  ENG 1979-1980 [64][66]
Alan Ball, Jr.  ENG 1980 [64]
Terry Yorath  WAL 1981-1982 [64]
Peter Lorimer  SCO 1983
Bob Lenarduzzi  CAN 1984 [64]
Shaun Lowther  CAN 1987
John Catliff  CAN 1988–1993
Ivor Evans  Fiji 1994
Rick Celebrini  CAN 1994-1995
Steve MacDonald  CAN 1996–1998
Paul Dailly  CAN 1999–2000
Kevin Holness  CAN 2001
Paul Dailly  CAN 2002–2003
Alfredo Valente  CAN 2004
Jeff Clarke  CAN 2005–2008
Adrian Cann  CAN 2008
Martin Nash  CAN 2008–2010
Jay DeMerit  USA 2011–2013 [67]
Nigel Reo-Coker  ENG 2013
Kenny Miller  SCO 2013
Pedro Morales  CHI 2014–present

dagger DeMerit was injured in the 2013 season-opening match and is out indefinitely,[68] although could return as early as September.[69] Various players have filled-in as captain match-by-match.

All-time goal scorers[edit]

As of 14 March 2014

Rank Player Nationality Goals
1 Domenic Mobilio  CAN 170
2 John Catliff  CAN 79
3 Jason Jordan  CAN 78
4 Carl Valentine  CAN 65
5 Dale Mitchell  CAN 49
6 Ivor Evans  Fiji 47
7 Eduardo Sebrango  Cuba 45
8 Camilo Sanvezzo  Brazil 43
9 Kevin Hector  ENG 40
10 Oliver Heald  CAN 39
11 Steve Kindel  CAN 36
12 Alfredo Valente  CAN 35
13 Bob Lenarduzzi  CAN 34
13 Doug Muirhead  CAN 34
15 Ray Hankin  ENG 33
16 Martin Nash  CAN 31
17 John Sulentic  CAN 30
18 Peter Beardsley  ENG 29
18 Paul Dailly  CAN 29
18 Trevor Whymark  ENG 29
21 Niall Thompson  CAN 27

Note: NASL, CSL, APSL, A-League, USL-1, USSF D-2, and MLS (Regular Season, Playoffs, North American Club Championship, and Canadian Championship)

All-time appearances[edit]

As of 14 March 2014

Rank Player Nationality Appearances
1 Carl Valentine  CAN 409
2 Bob Lenarduzzi  CAN 362
3 Steve Macdonald  CAN 320
4 Steve Kindel  CAN 287
5 Domenic Mobilio  CAN 286
6 Martin Nash  CAN 285
7 Alfredo Valente  CAN 271
8 Jason Jordan  CAN 257
9 Doug Muirhead  CAN 233
10 Paul Dolan  CAN 223
11 Ivor Evans  Fiji 221
12 Jeff Clarke  CAN 202
13 Chris Franks  CAN 201
14 David Morris  USA 200
15 Geordie Lyall  CAN 193
16 Paul Dailly  CAN 187
17 Oliver Heald  CAN 186
18 David Norman  CAN 171
19 John Catliff  CAN 147
20 Doug McKinty  CAN 137
21 Jeff Skinner  CAN 128
22 Jay Nolly  USA 126
23 Dale Mitchell  CAN 121
24 Guido Titotto  CAN 118
25 John Sulentic  CAN 115
26 Nico Berg  CAN 112
26 Jamie Lowery  CAN 112
27 Nick Dasovic  CAN 106
28 Jim Easton Jr.  CAN 102
28 Camilo Sanvezzo  BRA 102
30 Shaun Lowther  CAN 99
30 Gershon Koffie  GHA 99

Note: NASL, CSL, APSL, A-League, USL-1, USSF D-2, and MLS (Regular Season, Playoffs, North American Club Championship, and Canadian Championship)

Managers[edit]

NASL
Name Nationality Years Ref.
Jim Easton  CAN 1974–1975 [70]
Eckhard Krautzun  GER 1976–1977 [70]
Holger Osieck  GER 1977 [70]
Tony Waiters  ENG 1977–1979, 1980 [71]
Bob McNab  ENG 1980
Johnny Giles  IRE 1981–1983
Alan Hinton  ENG 1984
CSL / APSL / A-League / USL-1 / USSF-D2
Name Nationality Years Ref.
Bob Lenarduzzi  CAN 1987–1993
Carl Valentine  ENG 1994–1999
Dale Mitchell  CAN 2000–2001
Tony Fonesca  CAN 2002–2004
Bob Lilley  USA 2005–2007
Teitur Thordarson  ISL 2008–2010 [72]
MLS team
Name Nationality Years Ref.
Teitur Thordarson  ISL 2011 [72]
Tom Soehn  USA 2011
Martin Rennie  SCO 2012 – 2013 [73]
Carl Robinson  WAL 2014–present [74]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Fryatt, David (2002). "THE PCSL - When did soccer have its beginnings in British Columbia?". The PCSL. Retrieved April 10, 2013. 
  2. ^ Press Release (May 12, 2012). "Report: Impact ties LA Galaxy 1-1 in front of 60,860 spectators at Olympic Stadium | Montreal Impact". Impactmontreal.com. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  3. ^ "The PCSL - When did soccer have its beginnings in British Columbia?". PCSL. 2002. Retrieved May 28, 2013. 
  4. ^ Davidson, Neil (October 25, 2000). "Whitecaps roll in, 86ers roll out of A-League". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation - Sports. Retrieved April 24, 2013. 
  5. ^ "BC Sports Hall of Fame and Museum". Bcsportshalloffame.com. Retrieved May 28, 2013. 
  6. ^ "WSA 1988 Season". A-leaguearchive.tripod.com. Retrieved May 28, 2013. 
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