HoHoKam Stadium

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Hohokam Stadium
Dwight W. Patterson Field
Hohokam Stadium logo.svg
HohokamPark.jpg
Former names Hohokam Park (1997–2013)
Location 1235 N. Center Street
Mesa, Arizona 85201
Coordinates 33°26′17″N 111°49′48″W / 33.43806°N 111.83000°W / 33.43806; -111.83000Coordinates: 33°26′17″N 111°49′48″W / 33.43806°N 111.83000°W / 33.43806; -111.83000
Operator Oakland Athletics
Capacity 12,500
Field size Left Field: 340 feet (100 m)
Center Field: 410 feet (120 m)
Right Field: 350 feet (110 m)
Surface Grass
Construction
Opened February 1997
Closed The City of Mesa
Architect Populous (HOK Sport)
Tenants
Oakland Athletics (MLB) (spring training) (HoHoKam Park: 1977–1979; 2015–present)[1]
Mesa Solar Sox (AFL) (1997–present)
Chicago Cubs (MLB) (spring training) (HoHoKam Park: 1996; 1997–2013)
Arizona State (Pac-10) (2002)
Mesa Miners (GBL) (2005)
WAC Tournament (2010–2012)

Hohokam Stadium, also known as Dwight W. Patterson Field and formerly Hohokam Park, is a baseball park located in Mesa, Arizona. Beginning in 2015, it will be the spring training home of Major League Baseball's Oakland Athletics. The stadium, named for the Hohokam people who occupied the region from approximately AD 1 to the mid-1400s, was built in January 1997 and holds 12,500 people. It replaced an older Hohokam Park built in 1977 at a location just east of the current stadium.[2] Hohokam Stadium has the largest scoreboard in the Cactus League, measuring 12 by 16 feet (3.7 by 4.9 m)

From 1979 to 2013, the Chicago Cubs held their spring training at Hohokam Stadium. In 1999, the Cubs established a Cactus League single-season attendance record. They drew 171,681 fans for its 15 home games, an average of 11,445 people per game. The stadium hosted the 2010, 2011, and 2012 Western Athletic Conference Baseball Tournaments.[3][4][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Mesa Launches HoHoKam Park Renovations for A's". Ballpark Digest. March 14, 2014. Retrieved September 22, 2014. 
  2. ^ Tom Rhodes (February 1997). "A History of the Hohokam of Mesa". Retrieved March 29, 2013. 
  3. ^ "2009–10 WAC Championships". WAC Sports. Archived from the original on 12 February 2012. Retrieved February 12, 2012. 
  4. ^ "2010–11 WAC Championships". WAC Sports. Archived from the original on February 12, 2012. Retrieved 12 February 2012. 
  5. ^ "2011–12 WAC Championships". WAC Sports. Archived from the original on February 12, 2012. Retrieved 12 February 2012. 

External links[edit]